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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Andover"

Property of the 
MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY u- 
7 7 V 'Y^ Andover 



: 





MEMORIAL HALL 
LIBRARY 

Andover, Massachusetts 
475-6960 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreporto19211925ando 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Receipts and Expenditures 




FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 81, 1920 



ANDOVER, MASS. 

THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1921 



n 



CONTENTS 



Almshouse Expenses 


60 


Liabilities 




77 


Personal Property at 


64 


Memorial Day 




54 


Relief out of 


63 


Memorial Hall Library 


51, 


118 


Repairs on 


62 


Librarian's Report 




124 


Special Committee Report 


100 


Miscellaneous 




57 


Superintendent's Report 

Aiding Mothers 
Animal Inspector 
Appropriations, 1919 
Art Gallery 
Assessors' Report 
Assets 
Auditors' Report 


65 
64 
73 
17 
143 
66 
77 
94 


Moth Superintendent's Report 

Moth Suppression 

Notes Given 

Notes Paid 

Overseers of the Poor 

Police 43, 

Printing and Stationery 


68 
47 
52 
53 
59 
69 
46 


Board of Health 


45, 91 


Punchard Free School, Report of 




Board of Public Works 


Appendix 


Trustees 




97 


Sewer Sinking Funds 


50 


Retirement of Veterans 




55 


Water Sinking Funds 


50 


Schedule of Town Property 




75 


Bonds, Redemption of 


56 


Schools 




29 


Brush Fires 


41 


Selectmen's Report 




29 


Collector's Account 


81 


Soldiers' Relief 




63 


Cornell Fund 


96 


Spring Grove Cemetery 


48, 


71 


County Tax 


51 


State Aid 




63 


Dog Tax 


54 


State and Highway Tax 




51 


Dump, Care of 


55 


Street Lighting- 




51 


Fire Department 


38, 90 


Tax Collector 




81 


Finance Committee 


108 


Town House 




36 


G. A. R. Post, 99 


54 


Town Meeting- 




11 


Hay Scales 


49 


Town Meeting, special 




23 


Inspector of Buildings 


74 


Town Officers 




35 


Insurance 


49 


Town Warrant 




102 


Interest 


50 


Treasurer's Report 




83 


Jury List 


79 


Tree Warden 




67 



33192 



TOWN OFFICERS 1920 



Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor 
WALTER S. DONALD, Chairman Term expires 1923 

CHARLES BOWMAN " " 1921 

ANDREW McTERNEN, Secretary " " 1922 

Assessors 

WALTER S. DONALD, Chairman Term expires 1923 

CHARLES BOWMAN " " 1921 

ANDREW McTERNEN, Secretary " " 1922 

Town Clerk 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Tax Collector 
WILLIAM B. CHEEVER 

Town Treasurer 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

School Committee 
EVERETT C. HILTON 
MARY W. FRENCH 
DAVID R. LAWSON 
MARY B. SMITH 
ROY H. BRADFORD 
RALPH W. COLEMAN 
ALFRED E. STEARNS 
FREDERICK E. CHEEVER 
EDWARD C. CONROY 

Superintendent of Schools 
HENRY C. SANBORN 

Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund Commission 
PHILIP L. HARDY Term expires 1921 

WILLIAM D. McINTYRE " " 1921 

ARTHUR T. BOUTWELL " " 1922 

BARNETT ROGERS " " 1922 

THOMAS E. RHODES " , " 1923 



Term 


expires 


1921 


a 


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1921 


a 


n 


1921 


tt 


a 


1922 


tt 


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1922 


n 


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1922 


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1923 


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1923 


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1923 



Superintendent of Water, Sewer Department, Highways and Parks 
FRANK L. COLE 



Engineers of Fire Department 

CHARLES F. EMERSON, Chief 

LLEWELLYN D. POMEROY, Clerk 
HARRY E. WELLS 



Board of Health 

FRANKLIN H. STACEY 
CHARLES E. ABBOTT, M. D. 
BANCROFT T. HAYNES 



Term expires 1921 
" 1922 
11 1923 



Chief of Police 
FRANK M.SMITH 



Constables 



GEORGE W. MEARS 
FRANK M. SMITH 
THOMAS F. DAILEY 



Term expires 1921 
« 1921 

" 1921 



Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 

NATHAN C. HAMBLIN Term expires 1921 

GEORGE F. SMITH 

ALFRED E. STEARNS 

BURTON S. FLAGG 

E. KENDALL JENKINS 

REV. FREDERICK A. WILSON 

FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 



il a 


1922 


il it 


1923 


11 11 


1924 


11 it 


1925 


ii ii 


1926 


il il 


1927 



Trustees of Punchard Free School — Terms expire 1922 

FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL MYRON E. GUTTERSON 

HARRY H. NOYES 

5 



Auditors 

JOHN S. ROBERTSON WALTER H. COLEMAN 

HARRY SELLARS 

Trustees of Cornell Fund 

DR. WILLIAM D. WALKER Term expires 1921 

CHARLES N. MARLAND " " 1922 

JOHN C. ANGUS " " 1923 

Superintendent of Moth Department 
EDWARD H. BERRY 

Tree Warden 
EDWARD H. BERRY 

Moderator of Town Meetings 
ALFRED L. RIPLEY 

Registrars of Voters 

CHARLES W. CLARK JOHN F. HURLEY 

PATRICK J. SCOTT GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Clerk 

Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery 

WALTER I. MORSE DANIEL H. POOR 

GEORGE D. MILLETT WARREN L. JOHNSON 

FRED E. CHEEVER DAVID R. LAWSON 

JOHN W. STARK 

Street Lighting Committee 

WALTER H. COLEMAN HENRY J. GARDNER 
FREDERIC G. MOORE JOSEPH L. BURNS 

FRED G. CHENEY 

Finance Committee 

HENRY A. BODWELL, Chairman GEORGE ABBOT 
EDWARD V. FRENCH, Secretary GEORGE B. FROST 
CHESTER W. HOLLAND J. HARRY CAMPION- 

WILLIAM B. CORLISS 



TOWN WARRANT 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ss.: To either of the Constables of the Town of Andc- 
ver, Greeting. 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in town affairs to meet and assemble at the Town House, 
in said Andover, on Monday, the First Day of March, 1920, 
at 6 o'clock a.m., to act on the following articles: — 

Article 1. — To choose a Moderator for one year, Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for one 
year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, one 
member of the Board of Assessors for three years, one member of 
the Board of Assessors for two years (to fill vacancy), three mem- 
bers of the School Committee for three years, one member of the 
Board of Public Works for three years, one member of the Board 
of Public Works for two years (to fill vacancy), one member of 
the Board of Public Works for one year (to fill vacancy), one 
member of the Board of Health for three years, three Auditors of 
Accounts for one year, three Constables for one year, one Trustee 
of Memorial Hall Library for seven years, one Trustee of Me- 
morial Hall Library for two years (to fill vacancy) , one Trustee 
of Pun chard Free School for two years (to fill vacancy), one Tree 
Warden for one year, one Trustee of Cornell Fund for three years 
and any other officers the town may determine to choose. 

Article 2. — To take action on the following question, Shall 
licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this 
town? 

7 



Article 3. — To determine what sums of money shall be appro- 
priated for Almshouse Expenses, Repairs on Almshouse, Relief 
out of Almshouse, Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children, 
Board of Health, Brush Fires, Fire Department, Hay Scales, 
Highway Department, Insurance, Interest, Memorial Hall 
Library, Memorial Day, Post 99, G. A. R., Miscellaneous, Parks 
and Playsteads, Police, Printing and Stationery, Public Dump, 
Retirement of Veterans, Redemption of Water, Sewer, High 
School and Andover Loan Act Bonds, Schools, Sewer Mainten- 
ance, Sewer Sinking Funds, Soldiers' Relief, Spring Grove Ceme- 
tery, State Aid, Street Lighting, Town Officers, Town House, 
Tree Warden, Moth Department, Water Maintenance Con- 
struction and Sinking Funds, and other town charges and ex- 
penses. 

Article 4. — To see if the town will appropriate a sum not 
exceeding $5000.00, to continue the macadam on Lowell Street; 
the same to equal an amount which the State and County 
will severally appropriate, on petition of the Board of 
Public Works. 

Article 5. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of four 
thousand dollars ($4000.00) to complete the work of reconstruc- 
tion on Wolcott Avenue which was started in 1919, on petition 
of John F. O'Connell and others. 

Article 6. — To hear and act on the report of the committee 
appointed to consider an Andover Memorial to those engaged in 
the World War. 

Article 7. — To hear and act on the report of the committee 
appointed to consider the sale of the Andover Town Farm, or 
change in method of operating the same. 

Article 8 — To see if the town will accept and maintain thirty- 
four (34) street light standards and lights in Shawsheen Village 
as per plans submitted to Lighting Committee and appropriate a 
sum of money therefor, on petition of William M. Wood and 
others. 

8 



Article 9. — To see if the town will accept as a gift from William 
M. Wood, a granite drinking-fountain to be located in Shawsheen 
Village, to take the place of the iron fountain now located there, 
on petition of William M. Wood and others. 

Article 10. — To see if the town favors the granting, by the 
Selectmen, of a Sunday License for Moving Pictures, on petition 
of Samuel Resnik and others. 

Article 11. — To see if the town will instruct and authorize the 
Board of Public Works to arrange and supervise the collection of 
ashes from houses of residents of the town, on petition of David 
R. Lawson and others. 

Article 12. — To fix the pay of the firemen for the ensuing year 

Article 13. — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 14. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in anticipation of the revenue of the 
current financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

Article 15. — To determine what disposition shall be made of 
unexpended appropriations. 

Article 16. — To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

Article 17. — To determine the amount of money to be raised 
by taxation the ensuing year. 

Article 18. — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

The polls will be open at 6 o'clock a.m., and may be closed at 
2 o'clock p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof, seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this eighteenth day of February, A. D. 
1920. 

ANDREW McTERNEN 
. CHARLES BOWMAN 

Selectmen of A ndover 



Andover, March 1, 1920 
Essex, ss. 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants 
of said town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes 
stated in said warrant by posting a true and attested copy of the 
same on the Town House, on each schoolhouse and in no less 
than five other public places, where bills and notices are usually 
posted, and by publication in the Andover Townsman. Said 
warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

FRANK M. SMITH 

Constable 



10 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 1, 1920 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to vote in town affairs convened in the Town House in 
said Andover on Monday the first day of March, 1920, at six 
o'clock in the forenoon, agreeably to the requirements of the 
foregoing Warrant, Moderator Alfred L. Ripley presided and after 
reading a part of the Warrant, it was 

Voted, To dispense with the further reading of the Warrant. 

Voted, To take up Articles 1 and 2 together. 

Voted, That the polls be closed at 2 o'clock p.m. 

Took up Articles 1 and 2 and proceeded to vote for Town Offi- 
cers and on the Liquor License question by the Australian Ballot 
System. 

The ballot box was found to be empty and registered 0000. 
The polls opened at 6 o'clock a.m., and closed at 2 o'clock p.m. 
as voted. The total number of ballots cast was 1209, forty- two 
(42) of which were female ballots for School Committee only. 

The result of the balloting was as follows : — 

Moderator — One year: 

Alfred L. Ripley 922 

Blanks 245 

Town Clerk — One year : 

George A. Higgins 929 

Blanks 238 

Town Treasurer — One year : 

George A. Higgins 895 

Blanks 272 

11 



Selectmen — Three years : 



George A. Christie 


366 


William C. Crowley 


323 


Walter S. Donald 


458 


Blanks 


20 


Assessor — Three years : 




George A. Christie 


370 


William C. Crowley 


317 


Walter S. Donald 


439 


Blanks 


41 


Assessor — Two years (to fill vacancy) : 




Andrew McTernen 


854 


David S. Burns 


1 


Joseph B. Scott 


1 


Blanks 


311 


Collector of Taxes — One year : 




William B. Cheever 


919 


Blanks 


248 


School Committee — Three years : 




Fred E. Cheever 


615 


Edward C. Conroy 


621 


Ella S. Morrill 


536 


Alfred E. Stearns 


750 


Walter H. Thompson 


415 


Blanks 


690 



Trustee Punchard Free School — Two years (to fill vacancy) : 

Frederic S. Boutwell 886 

Blanks 281 

Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund Commission — 
Three years: 

Thomas E. Rhodes 814 

Blanks 353 

12 



Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund Commission — 
Two years (to fill vacancy) : 

Arthur T. Boutwell 872 

Blanks 295 

Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund Commission — 
One year (to fill vacancy) : 

William D. Mclntyre 766 

Blanks 401 

Board of Health — Three years : 

Bancroft T. Haynes 810 

Blanks 357 

Auditors of Accounts — One year : 

Walter H. Coleman 820 

John S. Robertson 863 

Harry Sellars 835 

Blanks 983 

Constables — One year : 

Thomas F. Dailey 804 

George W. Mears 792 

Frank M. Smith 835 

Blanks 1070 

Trustee of Memorial Hall Library — Seven years: 

Frederic S. Boutwell 859 

Blanks 308 

Trustee of Memorial Hall Library — Two years (to fill 
vacancy) : 

Charles U. Bell 865 

Blanks 302 

Tree Warden — One year : 

Edward H. Berry 860 

Blanks 307 

13 



Shall Licenses be granted for the sale of Intoxicating Liquors in 
this town? 

Yes 548 

No 486 

Blanks 133 

All the foregoing officers and questions were voted on by ballot 
and the check lists were used. 



REPORT OF THE PRECINCT CLERK 

Andover, Mass., March 1, 1920 

Polls opened at 6 a.m. Voted to close polls at 2 p.m. Ballot 
box registered 0000. Ballot box registered when polls closed 
1208. Number of male ballots received 1850. Number of fe- 
male ballots received 200. Number of male voters voting 1167. 
Number of female voters voting 42. Number of votes cast 1209. 
Number of male ballots returned 683. Number of female ballots 
returned 158. 

DANIEL A. COLLINS, Clerk 

The Moderator declared: 
Alfred L. Ripley elected Moderator for one year. 
George A. Higgins elected Town Clerk for one year. 
George A. Higgins elected Town Treasurer for one year. 
Walter S. Donald elected Selectman for three years. 
Walter S. Donald elected Assessor for three years. 
Andrew McTernen elected Assessor for two years. 
William B. Cheever elected Collector of Taxes for one year. 
Fred E. Cheever elected School Committee for three years. 
Edward C. Conroy elected School Committee for three years. 
Alfred E. Stearns elected School Committee for three years. 

14 



Frederic S. Boutwell elected Trustee Punchard Free School 
for two years. 

Thomas E. Rhodes elected Board of Public Works and Sink- 
ing Fund Commission for three years. 

Arthur T. Boutwell elected Board of Public Works and Sinking 
Fund Commission for two years. 

William D. Mclntyre elected Board of Public Works and 
Sinking Fund Commission for one year. 

Bancroft T. Haynes elected Board of Health for three 
years. 

Walter H. Coleman elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

John S. Robertson elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

Harry Sellars elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

Thomas F. Dailey elected Constable for one year. 

George W. Mears elected Constable for one year. 

Frank M. Smith elected Constable for one year. 

Frederic S. Boutwell elected Trustee of Memorial Hall Li- 
brary for seven years. 

Charles U. Bell elected Trustee of Memorial Hall Library for 
two years. 

Edward H. Berry elected Tree Warden for one year. 

Chose Trustee of Cornell Fund for three years: — John C. 
Angus. 

Chose Street Lighting Committee for one year (appointed by 
Moderator): Walter H. Coleman, Fred G. Cheney, Henry J. 
Gardner, Joseph L. Burns, Frederic G. Moore. 

Chose Finance Committee for one year (appointed by Mod- 
erator) : George Abbot, Henry A. Bodwell, John H. Campion, 
William B. Corliss, Edward V. French, George B. Frost, Chester 
W. Holland. 

15 



Upon opening the business meeting, the Moderator, Mr. Rip- 
ley, spoke as follows relative to the chair left vacant by the death 
of Selectman Eames : 

"Fellow Townsmen : — None of us can gather here to- 
day without a conscious sense of loss and a strange feel- 
ing of bewilderment. The loss is both personal and civic ; 
a sterling man, of uprightness and sagacity, is gone from 
our midst. His thought and effort on behalf of the town 
were ceaseless and unstinted ; he gave his best and his 
best was always good . He was of a type on which we like 
to pride ourselves as native and belonging to New Eng- 
land soil and traditions; simple, clear, painstaking and 
unselfish. There was none of the modern advertising 
manner in his work or character; nothing betrayed 
either self-consciousness or self-seeking. We can ill 
spare him; we need more like him. If this meeting sees 
fit to commemorate in its record the public service of the 
late Harry M. Eames, it seems to me the fitting mo- 
ment." 

Upon motion of Hon. John N. Cole, the following resolution 
was adopted by a rising vote : — 

"Whereas the Divine Ruler has in his wisdom called 
from earthly service one to whom had been entrusted 
large responsibilities in the affairs of Andover, the citi- 
zens of the town assembled in Annual Meeting desire to 
unite in expressing their appreciation of the high charac- 
ter and the long and honorable public service of the late 
Harry Millett Eames. 

"Under the guidance of Mr. Eames as Selectman for 
thirteen years, the finances of the town have been skill- 
fully directed, and the agencies for carrying on local 
government have been chosen with care and superior 
judgment. As a Representative in the General Court he 
ever exemplified by word and vote the purpose of his 
town and the desires of his constituency to promote the 
best ideals of Massachusetts. 

16 



"Asa citizen he was a true friend, a kindly neighbor, 
and an unfailing exemplar of the sort of sturdy New 
England manhood that for three centuries has been 
molding the destinies of the United States. 

"Resolved — That the Town of Andover has suffered 
a serious loss by the death of one who, through a broad 
love for his town, through a high conception of the 
purpose of public service, through a deep loyalty to 
public duty, had lifted office-holding to a high stand- 
ard and made public service a contributor to a better 
community. 

"Resolved — That the sympathy of this gathering 
be extended to the widow of Mr. Eames and his near rel- 
atives, and that a copy of this minute be spread upon 
the town records." 

Voted — To appropriate the following stated sums of money : — 



Almshouse Expenses 


% 4500.00 


Almshouse Repairs 


300.00 


Relief out of Almshouse 


4000.00 


Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children 


3000.00 


Board of Health 


3000.00 


Brush Fires 


600.00 


Fire Department 


18000.00 


Hay Scales 


125.00 


Highway Department 




Maintenance 


30000.00 


New Construction 


30000.00 


Insurance (fire) 


2000.00 


Insurance (Workmen's Compensation) 


2200.00 


Interest 


15000.00 


Memorial Hall Library 


3000.00 


Memorial Day 


450.00 


Post 99, G. A. R. 


100.00 


Miscellaneous 


3000.00 


Amount carried forward 


$119275.00 



17 



Amount brought forward 



$119275.00 



Parks and Playsteads 1 200 . 00 

Police 7800.00 

Printing and Stationery 3000 . 00 

($1400 for Printing Report of Real Estate Valuations) 
Public Dump 75.00 

Retirement of Veterans, Acts of 1912 300.00 

Redemption of Water Bonds $8000 . 00 

Redemption of Punchard School Bonds 6000 . 00 

Redemption of Andover Loan Act Bonds 5000 . 00 
Redemption of Sewer Bonds 5000.00 

24000.00 
92000.00 
2500.00 
1000.00 
1200.00 
2500.00 
1500.00 
6700.00 
8815.00 
3000.00 
4250.00 

17000.00 

2000.00 

750.00 



Schools 

Sewer Department Maintenance 

Sewer Department Sinking Fund 

Soldiers' Relief 

Spring Grove Cemetery (to include receipts) 

State Aid 

Street Lighting 

Town Officers 

Town House 

Tree Warden, Gypsy and Browntail Moth Dept. 

Water Department 
Maintenance 
Construction 
Sinking Fund 

In connection with the Water Department ap- 
propriations it was voted — That the Board of 
Public Works be instructed to investigate the 
whole status of the Water Department, covering 
the question of rates, the charges for fire service 
and other public services and the advisability of 
having the Water Department operated as a 
self-supporting department and to report its con- 
clusions and recommendations at the next Annual 
Town Meeting or at a Special Town Meeting. 



Amount carried forward 



$289865.00 



is 



A mount brought forward $298865 . 00 

Lowell Street, (Article 4) $5000.00 

Wolcott Avenue, (Article 5) 1500.00 



$305365.00 
State Tax and Highway Tax (estimate) 28000.00 

County Tax (estimate) 15000 . 00 



$348365.00 



Took up Article 4. 

Voted, at 3.30 p.m., To appropriate a sum not exceeding 
$5000.00, to continue the macadam on Lowell Street; the same 
to equal an amount which the State and County will severally 
appropriate. 

Took up Article 5. 

Voted, at 3.50 p.m., To appropriate the sum of $1500.00 to 
continue the work of reconstruction on Wolcott Avenue which 
was started in 1919. 

Took up Article 6. 

Voted, at 4.24 p.m., That the Committee on War Memorial be 
continued for the purpose of formulating a program to carry into 
effect as much of the recommendation submitted at this meet- 
ing by report and plans of its committee as it believes can be 
financed through taxation, supplemented by private subscription. 
That for the purpose of learning what private subscriptions 
might be available, said committee be authorized to increase its 
members and arrange an organization for canvassing the town. 
That the committee report its recommendations to the town, 
but that the committee have no authority to bind the town to 
any expenditure from taxation or otherwise unless and until 
authorized so to do by the town at a future town meeting. 

19 



Took up Article 7. 

Voted, at 4.25 p.m., That the committee appointed to consider 
the sale of the And over Town Farm, or change in method of op- 
erating the same, be continued. 

Took up Article 8. 

Voted, at 4.26 p.m. to lay on the table. 

Took up Article 9. 

Voted, at 4.32 p.m., That the town accept with pleasure and 
satisfaction as a gift from William M. Wood, a granite drinking 
fountain to be located in Shawsheen Village, to take the place of 
the iron fountain now located there, subject to the approval of 
the Board of Public Works. 

Voted, at 4.34 p.m., To reconsider Article 8 and voted at 4.40 
p. m. to refer to the Lighting Committee with the understanding 
that the committee be co-operative with the petitioner in con- 
sideration of the matter. 

Took up Article 10. 

Voted, at 5.06 p.m., That it is the sense of this meeting that 
Sunday License for Moving Pictures be not granted. 

Took up Article 11. 

Voted, at 5.08 p.m., Not to instruct and authorize the Board 
of Public Works to arrange and supervise the collection of ashes 
from houses of residents of the town. 

Took up Article 12. 

Voted, at 5.09 p.m., That the pay of the firemen be the same 
as last year, viz.: $150 per year. 

Took up Article 13. 

Voted, at 5.10 p.m., That the taxes be collected by the Tax 
Collector, that he receive a salary of $1800.00 per year, and 

20 



that interest be charged at the rate of six per cent per annum 
from October 15 on all taxes remaining unpaid after November 1. 

Took up Article 14. 

Voted, at 5.12 p.m., That the Town Treasurer, with the ap- 
proval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning January 1, 1920, and to issue a note or 
notes therefor, payable within one year, any debt or debts in- 
curred under this vote to be paid from the revenue of said finan- 
cial year. 

Took up Article 15. 

Voted, at 5.13 p.m., That all unexpended appropriations be 
turned into the Treasury. 

Took up Article 16. 

Voted, at 5.14 p.m., That the report of the Town Officers be 
accepted. 

Took up Article 17. 

Voted, at 5.15 p.m., To raise by taxation $214,000.00 and also 
an amount sufficient to meet the State and County Taxes after 
deducting receipts from the State Income Tax. 

Took up Article 18. 

Voted, at 5.25 p.m., That the Moderator appoint a committee 
of seven, two of whom shall be officers of the town, one a member 
of the Board of Selectmen, another a member of the Board of 
Public Works, with instructions to attend the hearing before the 
Committee on Roads and Bridges on March 9th, and to request 
that Bill 845 be withdrawn, unless it is so amended as to provide 
for a referendum of its legislation to the voters of Andover at a 
regular or special town meeting, for approval and ratification. 
The Moderator appointed, The Chairman of the Board of Se- 

21 



lectmen, the Chairman of the Board of Public Works, E. V. 
French, Judge Charles U. Bell, Henry A. Bodwell, John C. An- 
gus, E. Barton Chapin. 

Voted, at 5.28 p.m., That the Selectmen be instructed to con- 
fer with Eastern Massachusetts Street Railway Officials in regard 
to better car service for And over. 

Voted, at 5.30 p.m., That the meeting be dissolved. 

The foregoing is a true copy of the Warrant and of the Officers' 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

Attest: 

GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Town Clerk 



22 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING JULY 20, 1920, 
WARRANT 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ss. : To either of the Constables of the Town of An- 
dover, Greeting. 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to 
vote in town affairs, to meet and assemble at the Town House, in 
said Andover, on Tuesday, the Twentieth Day of July, 1920, 
at 7.30 o'clock p.m., to act on the following articles: 

%/Article 1. — To see if the Town will accept the provisions of 
Chapter 475 of the Acts of 1920 in relation to the construction of a 
new bridge on Haverhill Street over the Shawsheen River under 
the direction of the County Commissioners. 

-Article 2. - — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of $12,- 
500 to meet its part of the cost of said new bridge over the Shaw- 
sheen River and authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to borrow said sum by the issuance of bonds or notes of 
the Town in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 475 of the 
Acts of 1920. 



A 



Article 3. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
forty thousand dollars ($40,000) for the purpose of extending the 
sewerage system from its present terminus near Stimpson Bridge 
to Haverhill Street in Shawsheen Village, so called, and authorize 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow the 
same by issuing bonds or notes of the Town, on petition of the 
Board of Public Works. 

Article 4. — To see if the Town will appropriate four hundred 
dollars ($400) for the improvement of street lighting in Shawsheen 

23 



Village, so called, upon petition and recommendation of the Street 
Lighting Committee. 

Article 5. — To see if the Town will vote to install two new 
boilers in the Town House to replace the present boilers which 
have been condemned by the Hartford Boiler Insurance Company 
and appropriate a sum of money therefor, on petition of the Board 
of Selectmen. 

Article 6. — To see if the Town of Andover will appropriate 
the sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000) to the American Legion 
Post No. 8, for the preparation and publication under its aus- 
pices of the history of the military and civilian activities of the 
Town during The Great War, on petition of Andover Post No. 8 
of the American Legion. 

Article 7. — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof seven days before the time of said 
meeting as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your do- 
ings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this eighth day of July, A. D. 1920. 

WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Selectmen of Andover 



Andover, July 20, 1920 

Essex, ss. 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabi- 
tants of said town to meet at the time and place and for the pur- 
poses stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attested copy 

24 



of the same on the Town House, on each schoolhouse and in no 
less than five other public places, where bills and notices are 
usually posted, and by publication in the Andover Townsman. 
Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

FRANK M. SMITH 

Constable 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to vote in town affairs convened in the Town House in 
said Andover on Tuesday, the twentieth day of July, 1920, at 
7.30 o'clock in the evening, agreeably to the requirements of the 
foregoing warrant, Moderator Alfred L. Ripley presided and 
read the warrant. 

Took up Article 1 . 

i/Voted, at 7.53 p.m., To accept the provisions of Chapter 475 
of the Acts of 1920 in relation to the construction of a new bridge 
on Haverhill Street over the Shawsheen River under the direction 
of the County Commissioners. The vote was unanimous. 

Took up Article 2. 

\J Voted, at 7.55 p.m., That by virtue and in pursuance of the 
provisions of Chapter 475 of the Acts of 1920 and for the pur- 
poses mentioned therein, viz. : of meeting its part of the cost of a 
new bridge over the Shawsheen River, the Town Treasurer is 
hereby authorized to issue bonds or notes of the Town in the ag- 
gregate principal amount of $12,500, the date of said bonds or 
notes to be determined by the Town Treasurer, with the ap- 
proval of the Selectmen, and payable in annual payments of 
$2500, so that said loan will be extinguished within five years 
from its date, bearing interest, payable semi-annually, at a current 
rate to be determined by the Town Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Selectmen. 

Said bonds or notes shall be denominated on the face thereof 
" Shawsheen Bridge Loan, Act of 1920," shall be signed by the 

25 



Treasurer and countersigned by a majority of the Selectmen and 
be under the seal of the Town and bear the statement that they 
are free from taxation in Massachusetts. Principal and interest 
of said bonds or notes shall be payable in lawful money of the 
United States at such bank or trust company as the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, shall elect. Said bonds or 
notes may be sold by said Treasurer at public or private sale at 
not less than their* par value, and shall be certified by a bank or 
trust company to be selected by the treasurer, with the approval 
of the Selectmen, and contain such statements not inconsistent 
with this note as the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, may determine. The vote was unanimous. 

Took up Article 3. 

I Voted, at 8.52 p.m., That that portion of a sewerage system 
shown on plan of John Franklin, dated June 1920, on the west 
side of the Shawsheen River between Stimpson's Bridge and 
Haverhill Street in Shawsheen Village (so called) be adopted as a 
part of the sewerage system of the Town of Andover and that the 
town appropriate the sum of forty thousand ($40,000) dollars 
for the purpose of said extension. That the Town Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to 
borrow said sum and to issue therefor bonds or notes of the Town 
bearing interest at a rate, to be determined by said Treasurer 
with the approval of the Selectmen, payable semi-annually April 
1st and October 1st, said bonds or notes to be signed by the Treas- 
urer of the Town, and countersigned by a majority of the Select- 
men and Board of Public Works, and to be under the seal of the 
town. They shall bear upon their face the words "Andover Sewer- 
age Loan of 1920" and the statement that they are exempt from 
taxation in Massachusetts. They shall be dated October 1st, 
1920, shall be issued in numbered series and shall be payable in 
accordance with the provisions of Section S, Chapter 286 of the 
Acts of 1895, so that the whole loan shall be paid in not more than 
thirty years from the date of the first bond or note issued or at 
such earlier periods as the Treasurer and Selectmen may deter- 
mine. 

26 



Principal and interest of said bonds or notes shall be payable in 
lawful money of the United States at such bank or trust company 
as the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, shall elect. 
Said securities may be sold by said treasurer at public or private 
sale or pledged at not less than their par value for money bor- 
rowed for the purposes of this act. Said bonds or notes shall be 
certified by a bank or trust company to be selected by the trea- 
surer, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

That by virtue of Section 10, Chapter 386 of the Acts of 1895, 
the Board of Public Works be and hereby is authorized to super- 
vise the construction of said extension, to bind the town by con- 
tract therefor, to take on behalf of the town by purchase or other- 
wise any lands, water rights, rights of way or easements in Ando- 
ver deemed necessary for the establishment of such an extension 
of the sewerage system and system of sewerage disposal and for 
connection herewith, and to do any and all other things reason- 
ably necessary or expedient to accomplish the purposes of this 
act in conformity to the law in such case made and provided. The 
vote stood affirmative 110, negative 4. 

Took up Article 4. 

y Voted, at 8.56 p.m., To appropriate four hundred dollars 
($400) for the improvement of street lighting in Shawsheen Vil- 
lage, so called. 

Took up Article 5. 

Voted, at 8.57 p.m., To install two new boilers in the Town 
House to replace the present boilers which have been condemned 
by the Hartford Boiler Insurance Company and appropriate 
$2500 therefor. 

Took up Article 6. 

Voted, at 9.10 p.m., That the town appropriate the sum of 
$3000.00 to be paid from the taxes of the present year for the 
preparation and publication of a history of the military and 

27 



civilian activities of the town during the World War, this work 
to be carried on under the auspices of Andover Post, Number 8, 
American Legion. 

Took up Article 7. 

Voted, at 9.15 p.m., That the meeting be dissolved. 

The foregoing is a true copy of the warrant and of the Officers' 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings of the meet- 
ing. 

Attest: 

GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Town Clerk 



28 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT 



SCHOOLS 




Appropriation, March 1, 1920 


$92000.00 


Receipts 


584.49 




$92584.49 


Henry C. Sanborn, Superintendent 


$ 3485.85 


Emily Walker, Clerk 


680.00 


Teachers' payroll 


55529.26 


Janitors' payroll 


6328.79 


Matron 


281.84 


Milton Bradley Co., supplies 


191.16 


Rockport Market, provisions 


10.01 


Alvah Wright, transportation 


740.00 


Charles H. Newton, trans, and supplies 


623.20 


J. H. Campion & Co., supplies 


128.58 


Joseph Chambers, transportation 


150.00 


Eastern Mass. St. Railway, transportation 


. 1718.11 


J. L. Hammett Co., supplies 


330.31 


E. T. Hethrington, supplies 


43.66 


W. J. Morrissey, conveyance 


563.00 


Boston and Lawrence Despatch 


7.45 


Edith More ton, expenses 


9.30 


Walter W. Coburn, supplies 


6.00 


F. J. Barnard Co., supplies 


90.20 


Oliver Ditson Co., supplies 


38.08 


Lawrence Gas Co. 


299.09 


The Macmillan Co., supplies 


167.99 


Standard Oil Co., supplies 


49.15 


Amount carried forward 


$71471.03 



29 



Appropriation and Receipts $92584.49 

Amount brought forward $71471 . 03 

Boston and Maine Railroad, transportation 1030.38 

Thomas Dea, expenses 5.00 

Lyons and Carnahan, supplies 51.83 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 133.41 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 88 . 57 

D. C. Heath & Co., supplies 132 . 76 

Ginn & Co., supplies 451 . 72 

William L. Frye, truant officer 106.20 

Betridge Tucker, expenses 5 . 60 

S. T. Shattuck & Sons, team hire 76.00 

The Office Appliance Co., supplies 17.08 

Edward S. Hardy, wood 111 ,00 

W. A. Allen, supplies 1 . 25 

Royal Typewriter Co., supplies 489.50 

Arthur W. Scribner, supplies 11 . 20 

Tyer Rubber Co., supplies 3.75 

Overmeadow Farm, supplies 16.95 

Kee Lox Mnfg. Co., supplies 10.50 

American Railway Express Co. 23.86 

Peoples' Ice Co., ice 8.50 

Andover Coal Co., coal 2458.00 

Morse Brackett Box Co., supplies 40.00 

C. C. Birchard & Co., supplies 16.91 

The Gregg Publishing Co., supplies 38.38 

Duplicator Supply Co., supplies 4.00 

Merrimac Boiler Works 18.35 

The Prang Co., supplies 5.95 

Wright Potter Printing Co., supplies 14.42 

Lawrence Lumber Co., supplies 638.87 

A. W. Shaw Co., supplies 30. 70 

Edward E. Babb & Co., supplies 1218.50 

L. C. Smith & Brothers Co., supplies 13.33 

W. H. Sylvester, tuning piano 11.00 

J. W. Richardson, labor 569 . 08 

Amount carried forward $79323.58 

30 



Appropriation and Receipts $92584.49 

Amount brought forward $79323.58 

Scientific American Publishing Co., supplies 5.00 

S. A. Courtis, supplies 20.54 

Silver Burdett & Co., supplies 81.58 

Sears Roebuck & Co., supplies 3.98 

H. I. Dallman Co., supplies 43.29 

Andover Steam Laundry Co. 7. 18 

J. E. Pitman, labor 22.49 

Gray and Kendall, labor 25.00 

Goodyear-Marshall Pub. Co., supplies 10.63 
The Andover Press, printing and supplies 446.05 

City of Lawrence, tuition 223 . 11 

E. E. Gray & Co., supplies 9.35 
Educational Specialties Inc., supplies 50.42 
Hiller & Co., supplies 34.53 
Little Brown & Co., supplies 79.28 
West Disinfecting Co., supplies 81.0.0 
Henry C. Sanborn, expenses 137.51 
City of Lowell, tuition 41 . 25 
Henry Holt & Co., supplies 39.21 
Underwood Typewriter Co., supplies 17.41 
World Book Co., supplies 298 . 37 
Diamond Spring Water Co., supplies 10.50 
Thiras Brothers, supplies 2 . 30 
Bernard L. McDonald Co., coal 7238.86 
American Book Co., supplies 164.57 
Bureau of Publications, supplies 2 . 00 
Literary Digest 4.00 

F. H. Stacey, supplies 26.38 
D. Donovan & Son, labor 8.15 
Donovan and Locke, labor 235. 15 
Henry E. La very, tuition 10.00 
Edward Dodge , labor 20 . 00 
Benj. H. Sanborn & Co., supplies 112.77 
Frank E. Dodge, labor 196 . 15 



Amount carried forward $89031.59 

31 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 
Charles E. Merrill & Co., supplies 
University of Chicago Press 
George W. Home Co., supplies 
George P. Pillsbury, wood 
Miller Bryant Pierce Co., supplies 
H. Sanford Leach 
Buchan & McNally, labor 
The Family Shoe Store, supplies 
Walter Walker, labor 
Fred Collins, labor 
J. H. Playdon, supplies 
County of Essex, tuition 
A. C. Seiler, supplies 
John R. Lyman Co., supplies 
E. McCabe & Co., supplies 
Kenney Brothers and Wolkins, supplies 
Alice S. Coutts, extra work 
Library Bureau, supplies 
Nathan C. Hamblin, expenses 
McGraw Hill Book Co., supplies 
Houghton Mifflin Co., supplies 
Board of Public Works, water 
W. H.. Coleman & Co., auto hire 
S. K. Ames, supplies 
Robert McCoubrie, labor 
Sydney P. White, labor 
C. A. Hill & Co., labor and supplies 
H. B. McArdle, supplies 
The Cable Co., supplies 
John Ferguson, repairs 
James Eaton, supplies 
Cheshire Chemical Co., supplies 
W. D. Walker, M. D., School physician 
Portia Clough, expenses 

Amount carried forward 

32 



$92, 


584.49 


$89031.59 




105.46 




43.88 




409.94 




151.00 




18.00 




4.00 




884.71 




6.75 




10.00 




10.00 




25.00 




71.14 




18.23 




15.35 




.70 




10.00 




18.75 




1.15 




7.79 




17.00 




23.54 




425.23 




7.40 




3.24 




10.00 




6.00 




151.26 




33.00 




.35 




14.00 




3.40 




26.00 




220.00 




7.00 




$91790.86 





Appropriation and Receipts 


$92584.49 


Amount brought forward 


$91790.86 


C. S. Buchan, supplies 


30.18 


Annie C. Crowley, labor 


1.35 


Mrs. L. A. Morse, eggs 


1.20 


Foster Music Publishing Co., supplies 


7.50 


New Method Varnish Co., supplies 


15.00 


Clara A. Putnam, services as Matron 


171.15 


Kansas State Normal School, supplies 


12.20 


L. E. Knott Apparatus Co., supplies 


100.32 


William Baker, labor 


6.00 


Walter Baker, labor 


6.00 


Allyn and Bacon, supplies 


110.76 


Outlook Co., supplies 


4.00 


Anderson and Bowman, labor 


3.25 


George E. Hussey, engraving 


1.00 


Elizabeth Hurley, tuition 


10.00 


George Dick, labor 


11.00 


National Geographic Society, magazine 


2.75 


Anna Ilgorsky, tuition 


10.00 


Willis Craik, tuition 


10.00 


Stewart Fraser, tuition 


10.00 


Henry Dolan, tuition 


10.00 


Anna Smith, tuition 


10.00 


Arthur Swenson, tuition 


10.00 


John J. Mahoney, tuition 


10.00 


Daniel McCarthy, tuition 


10.00 


Mrs. John Hannon, tuition 


10.00 


Gladys Mears, tuition 


10.00 


James Sullivan, tuition 


10.00 


James Cuthill, tuition 


10.00 


Joseph Carroll, tuition 


10.00 


Helen Leonard, tuition 


10.00 


Alice Kay ley, tuition 


10.00 


Annie Vannett, tuition 


10.00 


Hayward Bros, and Wakefield Co., supplies 17.25 


Amount carried forward 


$92460.77 



33 



Appropriation and Receipts 

Amount brought forward 
Hazel Underwood, expenses 
Teacher's College 
School Arts Magazine, supplies 
Gaylord Brothers, supplies 
George T. Johnson Co., supplies 
Charles Fettes, labor 
Standard Electric Time Co. 
Thomas Hayter, labor 
James Thompson, labor 
Dowling School Supply Co., supplies 
Helen De M. Dunn, expenses 

Total expenditure 
Balance 





$92584.49 


$92460. 


,77 


1 


.80 


6 


.24 


3 


.00 


3 


.48 


23 


.00 


7. 


.80 


8 


.48 


23 


.40 


23 


.40 


5 


.28 


1 


.80 


92569 


.45 


15 


.04 



S92584.49 S92584.49 



34 



TOWN OFFICERS 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 $8815.00 

Harry M. Eames, Chairman Selectmen 

Walter S. Donald, Selectman & Assessor 

Andrew McTernen, Selectman Sc Assessor 

Charles Bowman, Selectman & Assessor 

George A. Higgins, Town Clerk 

George A. Higgins, Town Treasurer 

William B. Cheever, Collector of Taxes 

Daniel J. Murphy, Town Counsel 

Precinct Officers, Precinct 1 

Precinct Officers, Precinct 2 

Registrars of Voters 

Walter H. Coleman, Auditor 

John S. Robertson, Auditor 

Harry Sellars, Auditor 

Joseph I. Pitman, Building Inspector 

Dr. J. J. Daly, Town Physician 

William C. Crowley, Sealer Weights and 

Measures 
Alfred L. Ripley, Moderator 
Smart & Flagg, bond for Treasurer and 

Collector 
Alvah P. Wright, Field Driver 
Frank P. Higgins, checker 
Frank Keefe, checker 



$100 


.00 


800 


.00 


716 


.67 


766 


.67 


1150 


.00 


1150 


.00 


1578 


.80 


375 


.00 


353 


.00 


132 


.00 


206 


.00 


75. 


.00 


75. 


,00 


75, 


,00 


366 


66 


200. 


00 


188. 


94 


10 


00 


180 


,00 


25. 


00 


3. 


00 


3 


00 



Total expenditure 8529 . 74 

Balance 285.26 



$8815.00 $8815.00 



35 



TOWN HOUSE 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 
George W. Mears, janitor 
Lawrence Gas Company 
William Knipe, labor 
Holden Brothers, labor 
C. A. Hill and Co. supplies 
Andover Coal Co., coal 
The Planet Co., supplies 
Daniel P. Webster, police duty 
David M. May, police duty 
Gray and Kendall, labor 
C. S. Buchan, supplies 
James Holt, labor 
Walter I. Morse, supplies 
Oliver Whyte Co., Inc., supplies 
H. I. Dallman Co., supplies 
J. W. Richardson, labor 
James W. Walker, police duty 
Cheshire Chemical Co., supplies 
Buchan and McNally, supplies 
Perley F. Gilbert, architect 
George C. Dunnells, police duty 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 
John Ferguson, repairing 
Annie F. Brown, labor 
W. H. Sylvester, tuning piano 
William C. Brown, police duty 
Lord & Co., tuning piano 
Anderson & Bowman, supplies 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



$3000.00 



$880.00 

371.56 

225.28 

208.70 

124.32 

93.58 

42.00 

35.50 

39.75 

45.31 

39.01 

91.58 

21.35 

86.00 

28.26 

18.18 

9.00 

8.00 

7.22 

15.00 



00 
50 
00 
92 



3.00 
3.00 
1.90 
2.15 



2416.07 
583.93 



$3000.00 $3000.00 



36 



NEW BOILERS 

Appropriation, July 20, 1920 $2500.00 

Shear Klean Grate Co., grates $ 198.97 

Philip L. Hardy, contract 675 .00 

Merrimac Boiler works, boilers 960 . 00 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight 9.03 

S. T. Shattuck & Sons, labor 2 . 00 

Buchan and McNally, steam fitting 209.84 



Total expenditure 2054 . 84 

Balance 445 . 16 



$2500.00 $2500.00 



37 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 
Earnings, Town Teams 
Sale of Materials 

Pay rolls, permanent men $10840.00 

Payroll, Engine Company No. 1 2552.50 

Payroll, Engine Company No. 2 910.00 

C. A. Hill, chief engineer 250. 00 

Fred Adams, engineer 200.00 

H. E. Wells, engineer 200.00 

H. E. Wells, repairs 5.88 

R. M. Haynes, supplies and grain 324.54 
American La France Fire Engine Co., 

supplies 100.77 

C. A. Hill & Co., supplies and repairs 148 . 75 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 124. 72 

Henry A. Prescott, supplies 57.05 

Lawrence Gas Company 157.82 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co. 50.46 

H. Bruckman, grain 68.80 

Dillon Machine Co., Inc., supplies 23.65 

W, H. Coleman & Co., supplies 54.37 

Est. H. M. Eames, hay 118.58 

Sinclair Refining Co., supplies 40.47 

Ralph L. Greenwood, janitor 100.00 

John Haggerty, labor and telephone 252 . 24 

Cross Coal Co., coal 92.05 

Andover Steam Laundry Co. 31.09 

Ira Buxton, labor 6.25 

Benjamin Jaques, supplies 7.50 

A mount carried forward $16717.49 

38 



$18000.00 

1499.18 

76.17 



Appropriation and Receipts 


$19575.35 


Amount brought forward 


$16717.49 


John Shea, grain 


356.75 


C. S. Buchan, supplies 


25.13 


Andover Press, supplies 


9.70 


Louis Kibbee, labor 


2.00 


Lester Hilton, labor 


2.00 


Scott T. Shattuck and Sons, labor 


51.00 


B. F. Nason, hay 


116.66 


John A. Collins, labor 


12.00 


William T. Rea, labor 


9.00 


Henry Hilton, labor 


2.00 


A. M. Colby, labor 


2.50 


Albert Cole, labor 


2.00 


William Knipe, labor 


48.43 


Louis Resnik, supplies 


8.20 


Fellows & Co., Inc., supplies 


15.40 


Tyer Rubber Co., blowing whistle and 




supplies 


200.18 


R. L. Buchan, labor and supplies 


598.90 


J. E. Pitman, labor and supplies 


247.36 


John L. Morrison, labor and supplies 


229.40 


Buchan & McNally, supplies 


21.57 


Charles F. Emerson, labor 


68.00 


Ivan Stedman, labor 


15.00 


0. F. Kress & Son, supplies 


8.00 


Camire Welding Co., supplies 


2.00 


Anderson & Bowman, labor supplies 


139.75 


Dayton Rubber M'fg. Co., supplies 


4.82 


Boston Woven Hose Co., supplies 


543.01 


Andover Coal Co., coal 


335.61 


E. W. Boutwell, hay 


95.76 


Standard Oil Co., supplies 


74.28 


Woodhouse M'fg. Co., supplies 


15.00 


Board of Public Works 


21.12 



Amount carried forward 



39 



$20000.02 



Appropriation and Receipts 




$19575.35 


Amount brought forward 


$20000.02 




E. T. Hethrington, supplies 


7.79 




The "Whatnot" supplies 


7.08 




Andover Battery Service Co., labor 


6.00 




Robert Ryan, labor 


13.00 




Donovan & Locke, labor 


21.07 




James Oldroyd, labor 


1.00 




J. F. Coles, expenses 


1.90 




J. H. Campion & Co., supplies 


2.20 




Hiller & Co., supplies 


3.40 




Gray and Kendall, labor 


11.79 




White-Hall Garage 


.45 




Theo. Muise, labor 


5.00 




Archibald Wheel Co., supplies 


49.60 




S. M. Spencer M'fg. Co., supplies 


12.47 




Benjamin Dane, labor 


2.00 




Gamewell Fire Alarm Tel. Co., supplies 


7.60 




Total expenditure 


$20152.37 




Overdrawn 




577.02 




$20152.37 


$20152.37 



40 



BRUSH FIRES 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 




L. Hilton, et al. 


$632.00 


Charles Emerson, et al. 


16.50 


I. Steadman, et al. 


20.50 


George Dunnells, et al. 


8.00 


E. Berry, et al. 


49.50 


R. Jackson, et al. 


4.00 


R. Bruce, et al. 


5.00 


A. P. Wright, et al. 


6.00 


State Forestry Dept., soda 


32.33 


J.W.Stark 


1.08 


Louis Resnik 


10.80 


Wm. Baker et al. 


25.50 


Harry Colbath, et al. 


19.50 


Jerry Cronin, et al. 


30.00 


Frank Crockett, et al. 


22.50 


P. Tucker, et al. 


1.50 


A. McKenzie 


19.00 


Wm. Brown, et al. 


3.50 


Patrick Murnane, et al. 


7.00 


Henry Piatt, et al. 


11.00 


Wm. Ross, et al. 


3.00 


F. Coles, et al. 


7.50 


J. Collins, et al. 


11.00 


C. Davis, et al. 


1.50 


R. Baker, et al. 


7.00 


F. Adams, et al. 


4.50 


Walter I. Morse, supplies 


20.70 


Badger Fire Ex. Co., Inc., supplies 


11.80 



$600.00 



Amount carried forward $992.21 

41 



Appropriation 






$600.00 


Amount brought forward 


$992.21 




Boston & Maine railroad 




.68 




E. F. Dahill, Jr., & Co., extinguishers 


64.00 




B. F. Hatch, et al. 




21.50 




Kerr Sparks, et al. 




4.50 




H. Miller, et al. 




7.00 




Wm. Collins et al. 




7.00 




Wm. Lindsay, et al. 




3.50 




Overdrawn 






500.39 


Total expenditures 


$1100.39 


$1100.39 



42 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 




$7800.00 


Essex County 




32.00 


Sale of Materials 




2.35 


Receipts from Special Duty 




1038.75 


Frank M. Smith, Chief 


11852.00 




Payrolls 


4620.00 




W. J. Morrissey, auto hire 


226.00 




Lane Construction Co., police duty 


1038.75 




Franklin S. Valentine, duty and killing 






dogs 


105.92 




George C. Dunnells, police duty 


97.00 




M. T. Welch, police duty 


121.87 




James W. Walker, police duty 


98.26 




Hubert H. Mayo, police duty 


52.08 




New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co. 


92.61 




Thomas F. Dailey, police duty and kill- 






ing dogs 


76.00 




George Dane, police duty 


72.00 




Walter I. Morse, supplies 


20.21 




0. P. Chase, supplies 


1.50 




C. A. Hill & Co., supplies 


4.20 




Gray and Kendall, labor 


50.13 




Parker & Co., supplies 


15.00 




Treat Hardware Corp., supplies 


4.50 




A. M. Colby 


14.50 




Charles J. Shorten, police duty 


37.75 




The "Whatnot" 


6.46 




Buchan & McNally, supplies 


9.00 




John Ferguson, repairs 


8.40 


• 



Amount carried forward $8624.14 

43 



Appropriation and Receipts 


$8873.10 


Amount brought forward 


$8624.14 


Daniel P. Webster, police duty 


9.00 


White-Hall Garage, supplies 


26.00 


Andover Press, supplies 


26.44 


Auto List Publishing Co. 


18.00 


John Stack, police duty 


18.00 


David M. May, police duty 


11.40 


Paul Hill 


3.00 


S. T. Shattuck & Sons, labor 


3.00 


H. F. Chase, supplies - 


4.00 


C. L. Wilson, labor 


2.00 


Frank L. Cole, supplies 


4.80 


Dr. W. D. Walker, services 


3.00 


Dr. P. J. Look, services 


3.00 


Dr. C. W. Scott, services 


4.00 


Andover Steam Laundry Co. 


.36 


Frank M. Smith, expenses 


20.94 


James Napier, expenses 


14.79 


Leonard Saunders, expenses 


6.30 


Geo. W. Mears, expenses 


2.50 




$8804.67 


Balance 


68.43 




$8873.10 $8873.10 



44 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 

Charles H. Newton, Inspector 

Lakeville State Sanatorium 

Rutland State Sanatorium 

Lotta Johnson, Nurse and Clerk 

F. H. Stacey, Board of Health 

F. H. Stacey, Milk Inspector 

F. H. Stacey, fumigating, expenses and 

supplies 
B. T. Haynes, Board of Health & fumigating 
William Knipe, labor 
Dr. C. E. Abbott, Board of Health • 
Dr. C. E. Abbott, fumigating, etc. 
Joseph P. Nolan, Plumbing Inspector 
Ladies' Union Charitable Society, Board 
Mrs. Frank A. Cook 
John W. Hall, Jr., quarantine 
Andover Press, supplies 
H. E. Wells, quarantine 
E. F. Mahady Co., supplies 
Massachusetts Assn. Boards of Health 
Modern Medicine Magazine 
John S. Fraize, burying cats 
Charles A. Hill & Co., supplies 
R. Diminick 

John H. McDonald, P. M., supplies 
Walter I. Morse, supplies 
The ' 'Whatnot," supplies 
W. H. Welch Co., supplies 



$3000.00 



$298.00 


261 


.14 


116 


.00 


726.00 


50.00 


75 


.00 


322 


.56 


59 


.50 


116 


.75 


75 


.00 


108 


.50 


246 


.00 


64 


.29 


36 


,00 


40 


,00 


39 


,10 


48 


.00 


5, 


,00 


4. 


00 


3. 


00 


4. 


00 


7. 


,48 


1. 


00 


24. 


10 




40 


2. 


49 


1. 


74 



Total expenditures 
Balance 



$2735.05 
264.95 



$3000.00 $3000.00 



45 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 

The Andover Press, printing and supplies 

The Andover Press, printing valuation book 1263 . 30 

Burroughs Adding Machine Co. 

John H. McDonald, P. M., supplies 

Henry M. Meek Pub. Co., printing 

Hobbs and Warren, printing 

Wright and Potter Printing Co., supplies 

George B. Graff Co., supplies 

Munson Supply Co., Munson keys 

Paragon Binder Corp., supplies 

H. M. Meserve and Co., supplies 

Ever Ready Mfg. Co., supplies 

A. W. Brownell Corp., supplies 

P. B. Murphy, printing 

Joseph C. Terry, printing 

Carter's Ink Co., supplies 

Board of Assessors, valuation book expenses 200.00 



$3i 


000.00 


280.44 




263.30 




10.40 




136.46 




7.54 




13.22 




10.50 




4.00 




4.00 




10.97 




17.65 




9.68 




15.50 




3.50 




2.80 




5.75 





Total expenditures 
Balance 



2995.71 
4.29 



$3000.00 $3000.00 



46 



GYPSY AND BROWNTAIL MOTH 
DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 
Sale of supplies and private work 

Payrolls $4659 . 68 

State Forester's Dept. . 90 

Samuel Cabot, Inc., supplies 33.12 

S. T. Shattuck & Sons, labor 130.88 

Boston and Maine Railroad 1.10 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 40.82 

John L. Morrison, storing and labor 128.65 

Edward H. Berry, sundry expenses 48.53 

W. J. Morrissey 40.00 

W. H. Coleman & Co. 192.43 

B. A. Wheeler, labor 5.50 
Buchan and McNally, supplies 8 . 80 
Boston Coupling Co., supplies 5.25 

C. S. Buchan, supplies 12.00 
Freeman R. Abbott, labor 416.89 
Fred White 12.00 
The Glidden Co., supplies 1398 . 98 



$4250.00 
4599.86 



Tree Warden : 
Payrolls 

S. T. Shattuck & Sons, labor 
.Gray and Kendall, labor 
The Andover Press, supplies 
Frank W. Spinney, trees 
L. A. Belisle, labor 
Walter I. Morse, supplies 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



1086.75 
12.50 

9.ao 

2.70 
84.00 
10.00 
20.05 

8360.83 
489.03 



8849.86 



$8849.86 $8849.86 



47 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



Appropriation March 1, 1920 




$2500.00 


Sale of lots 




1142.50 


Perpetual care 




365.00 


Care of lots 




442.50 


Interments and use of tomb 




529.00 


Foundations 




391.76 


Sundries 




209.75 


Interest 




18.89 


Pay rolls 


$4608.80 




American Vault Works, supplies and markers 196.74 




Elmer F. Conkey, labor and supplies 


213.50 




Edith P. Sellars, clerk 


100.00 




Mrs. H. M. Eames 


72.00 




Walter I. Morse, supplies 


61.70 




Board of Public Works, water 


61.36 




Reade Manufacturing Co., supplies 


57.50 




Buchan and McNally, supplies 


41.84 




J. H. Playdon, plants 


40.65 




Bellevue Monumental Works, supplies 


28.00 




William Lord, re-purchase of lot 


25.00 




Frank E. Dodge, labor 


17.40 




The Andover Press, printing and supplies 


14.70 




Anderson and Bowman, labor and supplies 


11.40 




George Seymour, supplies 


7.70 




George D. Ward, supplies 


6.75 




Warren L. Johnson, supplies 


4.80 




Boston and Maine Railroad 


2.81 




C. S. Buchan, supplies 


1.99 




Total Expenditures 


$5574.64 




Balance 


24.76 




- 


$5599.40 


$5599.40 



48 



INSURANCE 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 
Appropriation, Workmen's Compensation 
Smart & Flagg, Agents, insurance 
Merrimack Mut. Fire Ins. Co. 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



HAY SCALES 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 

Receipts 

Fairbanks Co., repairs 

J. E. Pitman, labor 

William C. Brown, weigher 

Frank E. Dodge, labor 

Total expenditure 
Overdrawn 



$1378.60 
1588.60 


$2000.00 
2200.00 


2967.20 
1232.80 





$4200.00 $4200.00 





$125.00 




70.50 


$ 12.80 




317.68 




100.00 




19.56 




450.04 






254.54 



$450.04 $450.04 



49 



INTEREST 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 
Interest received on deposits 
Paid 158 Water Bond Coupons at $20 
Paid 79 Water Bond Coupons at $17 . 50 
Paid 170 Sewer Bond Coupons at $20 
Paid 186 High School Bond Coupons 

at $20 
Paid 10 Andover Loan Act Bond 

Coupons at $20 
Interest on Notes 1 to 12 

Total expenditure 
Overdrawn 





$15000.00 




686.53 


$3160.00 




1382.50 




3400.00 





3720.00 



200.00 
3874.62 




15737.12 


50.59 


$15737.12 


$15737.12 



WATER SINKING FUND 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 
Thomas E. Rhodes, Treas., Sink. F'ds 



$750.00 



$750.00 



$750.00 



$750.00 



SEWER SINKING FUND 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 $1000.00 

Thomas E. Rhodes, Treas., Sink. F'ds $1000.00 



$1000.00 $1000.00 



50 



STREET LIGHTING 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 

Lawrence Gas Company $6574.73 

Balance 125.27 


$6700.00 


$6700.00 


$6700.00 


STATE TAX AND HIGHWAY TAX 





Andover's proportion of State Tax 
Andover's proportion of Highway Tax 
Special State Tax 
Bank Tax 

Eastern Mass. St. R. R. Co., Tax 
Civilian War-Poll Tax 
James Jackson, Treasurer and Receiver 
General 





$25900.00 




5423.12 




1221.00 




2098.10 




214.05 




5823.00 


$40679.27 




$40679.27 


$40679.27 



COUNTY TAX 



Andover's proportion of County Tax 

David^L Robinson, County Treas. $15291 . 96 



$15291.96 



$15291.96 $15291.96 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 

Frederic S. Boutwell, Treasurer Memorial 

Hall Library $3000.00 



51 



$3000.00 



$3000.00 $3000.00 



NOTES GIVEN 



April 3, Andover National Bank, Note No. 1 

due Nov. 19, Rate 5.70 $ 25000. 00 

April 3, Andover National Bank, Note No. 2 

due Nov. 25, Rate 5.70 10000. 00 

April 3, Andover National Bank, Note No. 3 

due Nov. 25, Rate 5.70 5000.00 

April 3, Andover National Bank, Note No. 4 

due Dec. 10, Rate 5.70 20000.00 

June 24, Andover National Bank, Note No. 5 

due Nov. 19, Rate 6.10 5000.00 

June 24, Andover National Bank, Note No. 6 

due Dec. 21, Rate 6.10 25000.00 

June 25, Andover National Bank, Note No. 7 

due Nov. 12, Rate 6.10 5000.00 

June 25, Andover National Bank, Note No. 8 

due Nov. 26, Rate 6.10 5000.00 

June 28, Andover National Bank, Note No. 9 

due Nov. 12, Rate 6.10 5000.00 

June 26, Andover National Bank, Note No. 10 

due Nov. 1, Rate 6.10 5000.00 

June 26, Andover National Bank, Note No. 11 

due Dec. 27, Rate 6.10 5000.00 

July 16, Andover National Bank, Note No. 12 

due Dec. 3, Rate 6.10 5000.00 

$120000.00 



52 





NOTES PAID 


10 




Nov. 


3, Andover National Bank, Note No. 


$ 5000.00 


Nov. 


13, Andover National Bank, Note No. 


7 


5000.00 


Nov. 


17, Andover National Bank, Note No. 


9 


5000.00 


Nov. 


20, Andover National Bank, Note No. 


1 


25000.00 


Nov. 


20, Andover National Bank, Note No. 


5 


5000.00 


Nov. 


29, Andover National Bank, Note No. 


2 


10000.00 


Nov. 


29, Andover National Bank, Note No. 


3 


5000.00 


Nov. 


29, Andover National Bank, Note No. 


8 


5000.00 


Dec. 


4, Andover National Bank, Note No. 


12 


5000.00 


Dec. 


10, Andover National Bank, Note No. 


4 


20000.00 


Dec. 


22, Andover National Bank, Note No. 


6 


25000.00 


Dec. 


30, Andover National Bank, Note No. 


11 


5000.00 




$120000.00 



53 



DOG TAX 



Received from County Treasurer $504 . 14 

Paid F. S. Boutwell, Treasurer Memorial 

Hall Library $504.14 



POST 99, G. A. R. 



54 



$504.14 $504.14 



MEMORIAL DAY 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 $450.00 

Ballard Holt, Quartermaster $450.00 



$450.00 $450.00 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 $100.00 

Ballard Holt, Quartermaster $100 . 00 



$100.00 $100.00 



RETIREMENT OF VETERANS 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 $300.00 

Paid to Veteran $300 . 00 



55 



$300.00 $300.00 



PUBLIC DUMP 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 $75.00 

Olof Benson, Keeper $75 . 00 



$75.00 $75.00 



REDEMPTION OF BONDS 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 

Water 
High School 
Andover Loan Act 
Sewer 
Abbott Village Sewer Assessments 

5 Sewer Bonds 161-165 inclusive 

5 High School Bonds 16-20 inclusive 

1 High School Bond No. 103 

5 Andover Loan Act Bonds, 36-40 inclusive 

1 Water Bond No. 290 

1 Water Bond No. 218 
ljWater Bond No. 336 

2 Water Bonds Nos. 253-254 
2 Water Bonds Nos. 347-348 
1 Water Bond No. 319 

Total 
Balance 





$ 8000.00 




6000.00 




5000.00 




5000.00 




357.18 


$ 5000.00 




5000.00 




1000.00 




e 5000.00 




1000.00 




1000.00 




1000.00 




2000.00 




2000.00 




1000.00 




24000.00 




357.18 





$24357.18 $24357.18 



56 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 

Edith P. Sellars, Clerk 

American Railway Ex. Co. 

S. T. Shattuck & Sons, labor 

W. J. Morrissey, auto hire 

Bureau of Accounts, certif. of bonds 

J. H. Playdon, supplies 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co. 

Lung Motor Co., apparatus 

Arthur L. Cole, desk 

Walter S. Donald, perambulating town lines 

Charles Bowman, perambulating town lines 

Andrew McTernen, perambulating town lines 

Thomas F. DaUey, labor 

Selectmen's expenses 

Assessors' expenses and carfares 

Auto List Pub. Co. 

J. E. Pitman, labor 

Andover Art Store, supplies 

C. A. Hill & Co. 

Andover National Bank, safe deposit box 

Lilla D. Stott, probate and registry returns 

W. and L. E. Gurley, supplies 

National Map Co., supplies 

William F. Gledhill, fish warden 

C. L. Wilson, labor 

Benjamin Jaques, wood 

Charles Buckley, use of horse 

David L. Coutts, auto hire 

Andover Grill, supplies 



$3i 


000.00 


$890.00 




4.11 




21 . 50 




124.00 




22.00 




20.00 




9.75 




150.00 




49.50 




3 25.00 




25.00 




es 25.00 




16.50 




10.00 




73.70 




10.00 




453.22 




1.75 




30.79 




5.00 




51.28 




15.28 




4.95 




10.00 




5.00 




5.00 




5.00 




5.00 




10.00 





Amount carried forward 



$2078.33 



57 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 $3000.00 

Amount brought forward 
George A. Higgins, town clerk, expenses 
Fairbanks Co., scales 
Irving R. Shaw, auto hire 
B. A. Wheeler, labor 
Banker and Tradesman 
Louis Resnik 

A. P. Wright, Field Driver 
John A. Riley, labor and supplies 
CM. Hewes, clerical work 
E. M. Lundgren, return of deaths 
Edgerley & Bessom, return of death 
M.J. Mahoney, return of deaths 
Edward L. Bennett, return of deaths 
John J. Breen, return of deaths 
Dr. P. J. Look, return of births 
Dr. W. D. Walker, return of births 
Dr. E. D. Lane, return of births 
Dr. J.J. Daly, return of births 
Dr. Chas E. Abbott, return of births 
Dr. E. C. Conroy, return of births 

Total expenditure 
Balance 

$3000.00 $3000.00 



$2078.33 


49 


.50 


174 


.25 


8 


.00 


12 


.50 


7 


.00 


7 


.60 


25 


.00 


26 


.20 


15 


.00 


19 


.25 




.25 


4 


.25 


1 


00 


1. 


25 


11. 


00 


6 


.75 


6. 


00 


3. 


,25 


2. 


50 


1 


00 


2459. 


88 


540. 


12 



58 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



The Overseers of the Poor submit the following report for the 
year ending December 31, 1920: 

The Town Farm is still under the efficient management of 
Mrs. Swan ton as Superintendent and Matron, which is an as- 
surance that the inmates are being well cared for. The inmates, 
who are all of advanced years, are able to render very little help 
about the Home; four of them having to be served with meals in 
their rooms. 

The report of the Committee appointed by the Moderator 
will be found on another page and the vote of the Town will de- 
termine the action of the Selectmen and Overseers of the en- 
suing year. 

WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Overseers of the Poor 



59 



ALMSHOUSE EXPENSES 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 


$4500.00 


Receipts from Town Farm 


497.33 


Mrs. F. A. Swanton, matron 


$ 766.67 


Mary Adams, labor 


480.00 


Mrs. Baxter, labor 


30.40 


Mrs. Jennie Page, labor 


71.72 


Mrs. Myrtie Burns, labor 


30.20 


Bertha E. Johnson, labor 


35.00 


Jessie Fowler, labor 


30.60 


William B. Corliss, grain 


207.51 


The Family Shoe Store 


32.73 


E. T. Hethrington, groceries 


311.39 


Lawrence Gas Co. 


241.32 


Albert W. Lowe, supplies 


40.95 


C. S. Buchan, supplies 


29.45 


Swift & Co., supplies 


12.00 


Buchan & McNally, supplies 


4.50 


Frank L. Holt, labor 


175.25 


Mrs. H. M. Eames, grain and potatoes 


63.09 


New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 


9.55 


Hiller & Co., supplies 


15.01 


Beach Soap Co., supplies 


12.70 


E. E. Gray & Co., provisions 


200.77 


F. H. Stacey, supplies 


12.75 


John Shea, g 


rain 


85.60 


J. H. Campi< 


)n & Co., groceries 


190.24 


H. Bruckmai 


in, grain 


320.20 


Lindsay and 


Young, provisions 


327.19 


Amount carried forward 


$37366.79 



60 



Appropriation and Receipts 




Amount brought forward 


$3736.79 


Rockport Market, provisions 


93.40 


Armour & Co., supplies 


6.75 


A. B. Sutherland Co., supplies 


6.23 


S. K. Ames, provisions 


28.86 


A. B. Loomer, provisions 


254.94 


Anderson and Bowman, blacksmith work 


49.30 


Reid and Hughes Co., supplies 


78.67 


J. E. Edwards, supplies 


6.10 


Frank L. Cole, supplies 


41.00 


Walter I. Morse, supplies 


85.26 


Frederick C. Srnall Co., supplies 


89.84 


Standard Oil Co., supplies 


3.75 


West Disinfecting Co., supplies 


4.50 


Chemo Co., supplies 


10.00 


C. A. Hill & Co., supplies 


14.05 


Herbert W. Holt, labor 


115.00 


C. L. Wilson, labor 


3.90 


The "Whatnot,'' supplies 


1.26 


H. F. Chase, supplies 


.1.05 


Andover Coal Co., coal 


313.43 


George D. Ward, labor 


6.75 


Robert V. Deyermond, labor 


19.22 


William C. Crowley, supplies 


4.75 


John D. Blackshaw, repairing 


5.00 


Board of Public Works 


42.74 


Chester D. Abbott, supplies 


55.58 


R. H. Sugatt, clothing 


34.50 


Curtis Shoe Shop, repairs 


10.85 


0. P. Chase, supplies 


24.50 


Andover Steam Laundry, laundry 


6.46 


James E. McGovern, supplies 


15.00 


People's Ice Co., ice 


77.25 


Herbert Lewis 


2.25 



$4997.33 



Amount carried forward 



$5248.93 



61 



Appropriation and Receipts $4997.33 

Amount brought forward $5248.93 

Shawsheen Market Inc., provisions 249.83 

Providence Churning Co., supplies 9.00 

C. I. Alexander & Sons, supplies ' 4.23 

J. H. Playdon 7.00 

Robert J. Barrett, labor 45.32 

Agnes H. West, supplies 15.84 

Daniel P. Webster, labor 7 . 00 

Warren L. Johnson, butter 13 . 60 

Andrew Basso, provisions 42.69 

John Ferguson, repairing 1.65 

Benjamin Jaques, fuel 13 . 00 



Total expenditure 5658 . 09 

Overdrawn 660.76 



$5658.09 $5658.09 



ALMSHOUSE REPAIRS 

Appropriation, March 1, 1920 $300.00 

Frank E. Dodge, labor 

Gray & Kendall, labor 

Board of Public Works 

Buchan & McNally, repairs 

Merrimac Boiler Works, re-tubing 

Total expenditure 
Overdrawn 

$478.84 $478.84 



$ 40.36 




9.90 




15.40 




18.93 




394.25 




478.84 






178.84 



62 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 
Total expenditure 
Balance 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 
Total expenditure 
Balance 



1920 


$ 940.34 
259.66 


$1200.00 




$1200.00 

$ 648.00 
852.00 


$1200.00 


STATE AID 

1920 


$1500.00 




$1500.00 


$1500.00 



RELIEF OUT OF ALMSHOUSE 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 
Paid out of Almshouse 
Paid other cities and towns 
Paid State 
Paid on account of State 


$2721.85 
207.00 
183.14 
276.50 


$4000.00 


Total expenditure 
Due town from State 


3388.49 
276.50 




Net expenditure 
Balance 


3111.99 
888.01 






$4000.00 


$4000.00 



63 



AIDING MOTHERS WITH DEPENDENT CHILDREN 

$3000.00 



Appropriation, March 1, 1920 
Town cases 

On account of other cities and towns 
On account of State 



Total expenditure 
Due from cities and towns 
Due from State 



Net expenditure 
Overdrawn 



586.33 
812.58 



$3009.19 

1241.00 

180.00 

4430.19 



1398.91 



3031.28 



31.28 



$3031.28 $3031.28 



PERSONAL PROPERTY AT ALMSHOUSE 



House Furniture 
Clothing 
Farm Stock 
Farm Produce 
Provisions 
Farm tools 
Fuel 



$1050.00 




200.00 




460.00 




375.50 




75.00 




350.00 




136.00 






$2646.50 



64 



FARM CASH REPORT 



Received for 






Cows and board 


ing cows 


$456.00 


Pork 




28.50 


Eggs 




23.48 


Milk 




43.35 


Apples 




6.00 




$557.33 


Paid for 






Pigs 






Chickens 






Town treasurer, 


cash 





$ 24.00 

36.00 

497.33 

$557.33 

MRS. F. A. SWANTON, 

Matron 



Number of inmates Jan. 1, 1920 7 

Number admitted 3 

Number of inmates, Jan. 1, 1921 10 

Number over eighty years of age 2 

Number between seventy and eighty 2 

Number between sixty and seventy 5 

Number between fifty and sixty 1 



65 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



We herewith submit our annual reoort : 



Number of male polls assessed 

Personal estate 
Real estate 

Poll tax 

Tax on personal estate 

Tax on real estate 

Rate of taxation per $1000, $24.50 

Number of 

Horses assessed 
Cows assessed 
Sheep assessed 
Neat cattle assessed 
Swine assessed 
Fowls assessed 
Dwellings assessed 
Acres of land assessed 



$2042541.00 
8044225.00 

j 

9705.00 

50043 . 74 
197085.04 



2323 



$10086766.00 



$256833.78 



497 
903 
107 
227 
229 

11485 
1787 

17816 



WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Assessors of Andover. 



66 



REPORT OF TREE WARDEN 



I have planted, trimmed, and removed some trees, also have 
done some brush cutting in the outlying districts, but owing to 
the lack of funds I was not able to do as much work as should 
have been done. In order to carry on the work of this Depart- 
ment I ask that the sum of $3000.00 be appropriated. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD H. BERRY 

Tree Warden 



67 



REPORT OF MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 



In submitting my report of this department I would say there 
is every indication of a return of the brown-tail moth next sum- 
mer after an absence of four years, and unless the owners of trees 
attend to this condition there is sure to be havoc in the trees of 
Andover. There is also an abundance of gypsy moths. I ad- 
vise all property owners to get busy at once to destroy the moth 
nests or else notify the tree-warden who will give the matter 
prompt attention. The situation is serious and demands im- 
mediate action. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD H. BERRY 

Moth Superintendent 



68 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



REPORT OF CHIEF 

To the Board of Selectmen. 

Gentlemen : — I herewith submit the report of the Police 
Department for the year ending Dec. 31, 1920. 

Whole number of arrests, 149. Males 137. Females 12. 

Offenses For Which Arrests Were Made 

Bigamy 1 

Manslaughter 2 

Larceny 12 

Violation of Motor Vehicle Law 44 

Drunkenness 16 

Assault 8 

Malicious mischief 7 

Vagrancy 1 

Insane 12 

Attempt to rape 1 

Breaking and entering 4 

Safe keeping 4 

Disturbance 4 

Abandoned child 2 

Neglect of child 1 

Gaming on the Lord's day 4 

Trespass 4 

Neglected children 2 

Adultery 3 

Town ordinance 3 

Assault on wife 1 

Violation of the Volstead Act 6 

69 



Obscene Literature 1 

Peddling without lie e 1 

Cruelty to animals 1 

Illegal transporting 4 

Total 149 
DISPOSITION OF CASES 

Committed to Essex County Training School 1 

Committed to Lyman School for B 1 

On probation 5 

Suspended sentence to House of Correction 

S -pended sentence to State Farm 4 , 

Returned to Tewksbury Infirmary I 

Returned to State Board of Charit: s 

Committed to House of Correction 6 

Continued for sentence 6 

Held for Grand Jury 4 

Paid fines in lower court 

Arrested for out-of-town offi 1 2 

Committed to Danvers State Hospital 12 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Fines paid in lower court 

Fines paid in Superior Court ; . 00 

Value of property reported stolen 24.45 
Value of property recovered 1458.45 
Value of police equipment 600. 00 

Dead bodies cared for 2 

Doors left open and secured 78 

- PERK »R O m*'RT FINDIN - 
N bill found 

Cases pending 1 

On probation 3 

Paid fir 8 

FRANK M. SMITH 

Chief of Police 
70 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



The Trustees of Spring Grove (Vmetery submit the following 
report : — 

This Department, like other departments, has had to contend 
with labor conditions and thus we have not been able to accom- 
plish the amount of work that we had hoped for. 

The Avenue on the East side connecting the lower side with the 
gate entrance is nearly completed and will probably be ready for 
use next year. All avenues and walks that have not been in use in 
times past have been and are being filled in and thus we have been 
making a few more lots on the West side. Quite a number of half- 
lots have been staked off this year for parties who do not require 
a regular sized lot. 

One plot of ground has been graded on the East side but not 
staked out as yet. The ground on the East side which has been 
cleared and worked over for the past two or three years is now 
ready to be sowed down. 

The Superintendent has carried on the work during the past 
year with satisfactory results to the Trustees and to others who 
are interested, and has all lots accounted and cared for with the 
exception of about one hundred lots of which we hope to report a 
smaller number not cared for next year. 

One serious situation has presented itself before the Trustees 
for the last two years, namely the tomb. Water has been leaking 
through the masonry work, making the place very wet and damp. 
There is not enough room under present conditions for receiving 
caskets and your Trustees feel that something should be done 
right away to remedy conditions and we therefore ask for an ap- 
propriation of $7500.00 and receipts for the reconstruction of the 
tomb and regular running expenses. 

GEORGE D. MILLETT WARREN L. JOHNSON 
WALTER I. MORSE JOHN W. STARK 

DANIEL H. POOR FRED E. CHEEVER 

DAVID R. LAWSON 

Board of Trustees 
Warren L. Johnson, Clerk, Board of Trustees 

71 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT 

To the Board of Trustees: — 

I herewith submit my annual report as Superintendent of 
Spring Grove Cemetery for the year ending December 31, 1920. 

Aside from the regular care of the cemetery we have grassed 
over several roads and walks that were unnecessary, in order to 
save expense in caring for them and to make more land for lots. 
We have also ashed several roads. On the new side we have laid 
pipe to carry the water on to the east side. 

We have ploughed up a large piece of stump land ; done some 
grading and cleared a large piece of brush land. Owing to the high 
cost of labor we have not been able to accomplish as much as we 
hoped to do. Many have put their lots under Perpetual Care 
during the past year and I would recommend all that possibly 
can to do so, as it is by far the most satisfactory way. I wish to 
thank the lot owners for their co-operation during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. A. SWANTON 

Superintendent 



STATISTICS OF SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 

Lots sold as per last report 502 

Lots sold in 1920 20 

Total lots sold 522 

Total number of single graves sold 191 

Interments as per last report 1471 

Interments in 1920 64 



Total interments 1535 



72 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S REPORT 



To the Board of Selectmen: — 

Gentlemen: — I hereby submit my report for the year begin- 
ning November 15, 1919, and ending November 15, 1920. 

Number of cattle inspected 1442 

Number of stables inspected 160 

Number of cows condemned because affected with 

tuberculosis 21 

Number of stables disinfected 1 6 

Number of interstate animals identified and released 

from quarantine 117 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES H. NEWTON 

Inspector of A nimals 



73 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 



To the Board of Selectmen. 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit my report of the Building 
Inspector's Department from December 31, 1919, to December 
31, 1920. 

Whole number of permits granted 207 

Number of addition and alteration permits granted 59 

Number of new building permits granted 146 

One and two family dwelling-houses 95 

Garages 22 

Barns 6 

Warehouses 3 

Business blocks . 1 

Camps 4 

Elevators 4 

Miscellaneous buildings 14 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH I. PITMAN, 

Building Inspector 



74 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY 



Town House and fixtures 


$50000.00 




Engine House, storehouse and barn 


25000.00 




25723 feet land 


20000.00 


$95000.00 






Memorial Hall 


30000.00 




22318 feet land 


12000.00 


49000 00 


Engine House, Ballardvale 


6000.00 


rrZ<V/v/l_J . \J\J 


New shed 


200.00 




1-3 acre land 


300.00 


6500.00 


Almshouse 


16000.00 


Barn and other buildings 


3800.00 




311-2 acres land 


7000.00 


26800.00 


Punchard High School 


94000.00 


4 acres land 


8000.00 


102000.00 


John Dove Schoolhouse 


25000.00 


Heating plant, Jackson schoolhouse 


30000.00 




Stowe schoolhouse 


31000.00 




3 3-4 acres land 


6000.00 


92000.00 


Bradlee schoolhouse, Ballardvale 


23000.00 


1 acre land 


500.00 


23500.00 


Richardson schoolhouse 


7000.00 


1-2 acre land 


400.00 


7400.00 




* 


Amount carried forward 


$395200.00 



75 



Amount brought forward 
Indian Ridge schoolhouse $17000.00 

1 acre land 800.00 



West Center schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 

North District schoolhouse 
1-2 acre Land 

Bailey District schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 

Osgood District schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 

Old schoolhouse, Ballard vale 
1-4 acre land 



9 acres land, Indian Ridge (gravel pit) 3000.00 
411-2 acres land, Carmel Woods Res- 
ervation 3600.00 
173751 feet land, Central Park,(Rich- 

ardson Field) 15000.00 

BandStand 1000.00 

6 1-2 acres land, Playstead 5000.00 

20 1-2 acres land, Playstead, Ballardvale 500.00 

41 1-2 acres land, Spring Grove Cemetery 9000.00 

Receiving tomb and toolhouse 1500.00 



3500.00 
150.00 


3500. 
50 


00 
.00 


2500, 
50 


.00 
.00 


2000. 

50 


00 
.00 


3000.00 
500.00 



$395200.00 



17800.00 



3650.00 



3550.00 



2550.00 



2050.00 



3500.00 



Andover Board of Public Works - 
Pipe lines and fountains 
Pumping station and buildings 
Coal shed 
3 acres land 
Two reservoirs 

Amount carried forward 



38600.00 

248000.00 

42500.00 

. 700.00 

800.00 

16000.00 308000.00 



$774900.00 



76 



Amount brought forward 


< 


$774900.00 


4 1-2 acres land 


$2350.00 




28 acres land, Boston Ice Co., Hag- 






gett's Pond 


2500.00 




Workshop, Lewis Street 


1600.00 




Old Stable, Lewis Street 


1000.00 




Barn and shed, Lewis Street 


3000.00 




47467 feet land, Lewis Street 


3000.00 




House, Engineer's house 


2500.00 




Pump house, east side of No. Main 






Street 


5000.00 




Steam road roller 


5500.00 




3 sleds 


75.00 




1 auto 


300.00 




3 horses 


800.00 




Carts and harnesses 


200.00 




Sewer System (30 acres Filter Beds) 


293000.00 




Workshop, Lewis Street 


1600.00 




Old stable (Low) 


1000.00 




Barn and shed, Lewis Street 


3000.00 




47467 feet land, Lewis Street 


3000.00 








329425.00 


Pimchard School Fund 




76454.28 


Memorial Hall, Permanent Fund 


45000.00 




Memoral Hall Library, John Cornell 






Fund 


7700.00 




Memorial Hall Library, John Byers 






Fund 


10000.00 




Memorial Hall Library, Edward Tay- 






lor Fund 


500.00 




Memorial Hall Library, Isaac E. 






Giddings Fund 


3000.00 




Memorial Hall Library and furniture 


10000.00 


76200.00 


Amount carried forward 


$1256979.28 



77 



Amount brought forward 
Memorial Hall Library, Woman's 

Christian Temperance Union 
Memorial Hall Library, Phillips Fund 

Personal Property at Town Farm 

Motor Combination Chemical Truck 

Motor Combination Pump and Truck 

One Steam Fire Engine and apparatus 

Hook and Ladder Truck 

Two hose wagons 

Hose sled 

Four horses 

Hay scales 

Safes in Town House 

41 1-2 acres land, Spring Grove Cem'y 

Receiving tomb and tool-house 

Weights and measures 
Fire Alarm apparatus 
4000 feet hose 



$1256979.28 


100.00 




3200.00 






3300.00 






2646.50 




5300.00 




9000.00 




2000.00 




1000.00 




1000.00 




60.00 




1000.00 




350.00 




800.00 


9000.00 




1500.00 






10500.00 
350.00 






5000.00 




2000.00 


$1301285.78 



78 



TOWN OF ANDOVER — JURY LIST 



Abbott, Newton S. 
Averill, George L. 
Angus, John C. 
Bailey, Samuel H. 
Baxter, George H. 
Barrett, Patrick J. 
Burns, David F. 
Cates, A. Lincoln 
Cannon, Gordon R. 
Carter, George M. 
Clark, Herbert 
Cheever, Fred E. 
Cole, Roscoe K. 
Cole, Joseph F. 
Cutler, Howard A. 
Dane, Louis A. 
Dick, James 
Disbrow, George W. 
Dunnells, George C. 
Flanders, Charles W. 
Flint, Edwin M. 
Garland, George M. 
Greenwood, Charles H. 
Hannon, Patrick J. 
Hannon, Lawrence J. 
Harrington, Daniel F. 
Hill, Ira B. 
Holt, George A. 
Holt, John V. 



Holt, George E. 
Hovey, James H. 
Keane, Mark M. 
Kendall, Frank H. E. 
Lawrence, George F. 
Lockhead, Robert 
Livingston, Porter I. 
Maddox, John 
Mahoney, Timothy J. 
May, George M. 
McGovern, Clarence F. 
Morse, George E. 
Michilini, Dionecio 
Miller, George R. 
Nason, Harry C. 
Nolan, Joseph P. 
Noyes, John L. 
O'Connell, Walter J. 
O'Donnell, Hugh F. 
O'Hara, Robert W. 
Riley, John A. 
Riley, Joseph A. 
Robinson, William C. 
Roggemann, Edward 
Saunders, George 
Seacole, Walter H. 
Scott, Joseph B. 
Scott, David M. 
Shaw, George 



79 



Shaw, Irving R. Valpey, Frank D. 

Sherry, Frank J. Valentine, Franklin 

Stott, George L. Walker, Salmond C. 

Taylor, Loren E. Whitman, David 0. 

Todd, Henry Wrigley, Thomas 
Tuttle, Benjamin B. 



80 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR 



To the Board of Assessors: 

The following is the Report of the Collector of Taxes for the 
year ending December 31, 1920. 

1917 



Amount as per warrant 




$ 3113.94 


Added to warrant 




5.96 


Moth work 




24.00 


Street sprinkling 




18.51 


Interest 




466.34 


Collected Taxes 


$ 2897.70 




Collected moth work 


24.00 




Collected street sprinkling 


18.51 




Collected interest 


466.34 




Abated 


222.20 






$3628.75 


$3628.75 


1918 




Amount as per warrant 




$11572.26 


Added to warrant 




9.38 


Street sprinkling 




42.21 


Moth work 




113.40 


Interest 




1010.09 


Collected taxes 


$10251.17 




Collected street sprinkling 


42.21 




Collected moth work ' 


113.40 




Collected interest 


1010.09 




Abated 


520.38 




Uncollected 


810.09 





$12747.34 $12747.34 



81 



1919 



Amount as per warrant 

Added to warrant 

Moth work 

Interest 

Collected taxes 

Collected moth work 

Collected interest 

Abated 

Uncollected 



Amount as per warrant 

Added to warrant 

Moth work 

Interest 

Collected taxes 

Collected moth work 

Collected interest 

Abated 

Uncollected 



1920 





$28802.36 




39.37 




238.80 




648.22 


$19641.35 




238.80 




648.22 




284.00 




8916.38 




$29728.75 


$29728.75 




$256833.78 




196.40 




3956.48 




226.12 


$223265.31 




3956.48 




226.12 




707.05 




33057.82 





$261212.78 $261212.78 

SUMMARY COLLECTOR'S CASH ACCOUNT, 1920 

Amount Collected and Paid to Town Treasurer 



1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 



Taxes 



i 2897.70 
10251.17 
19641.35 

223265.31 



Moth 
Work 



i 24.00 
113.40 
238.80 

3956.48 



Street 
Sprinkling 



$18.51 
42.21 



$256055 . 53 $4332 . 68 $60 . 72 $2350 . 77 $262799 . 70 



Interest 



$ 466.34 

1010.09 

648.22 

226.12 



Total 



5 3406.55 
11416.87 
20528.37 

227447.91 



WILLIAM B. CHEEVER, Collector of Taxes 

82 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Liabilities 

Water Bonds, 4% (5000 due 1921) $77000.00 

Water Bonds, 3Y % % (3000 due 1921) 38000.00 

Sewer Bonds, 4% (5000 due 1921) 80000.00 

Sewer Bonds, 5% (2000 due 1921) 40000.00 
High School Loan, 4% (6000 due 1921) 87000.00 

Assets 

Cash, General Fund $22119 . 06 

Cash, Water Loan 5026 . 59 

Cash, Sewer Loans 587 . 59 

Cash, Sewer Premium 858.22 

War Memorial Book 3000 . 00 

Uncollected taxes 42784 . 29 

Moth work 322.50 

Commonwealth, State Aid 648.00 

Commonwealth, Temporary Aid 276.50 

Cities and Towns, Mothers' Aid 586 . 33 

Commonwealth, Mothers' Aid 812.58 

Sewer Assessments 3859 . 52 

Unpaid Water Rates of January 1st 6869. 19 

Sinking Funds 52196.49 

Balance against Town 



$322000.00 



31591.46 



43106.79 



65248.61 
182053.14 



$322000.00 



S3 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 



Dr. 

Balance Jan. 1, 1920, General Fund 

Balance Jan. 1, 1920, Water Loan 

Balance Jan. 1, 1920, Sewer Loan 

Balance Jan. 1, 1920, Sewer Assessments for Sinking 

Funds 
Commonwealth, Corporation Tax 
Commonwealth, Bank Tax 
Commonwealth, Income Tax, 1920 
Commonwealth, Income Tax, 1919 
Commonwealth, Income Tax, 1918 
Commonwealth, Income Tax, 1917 
Commonwealth, Soldiers' Exemption 
Commonwealth, General School Fund 
Commonwealth, Reimbursement taxes on land 
Commonwealth, Street Railway Tax 
Commonwealth, State Aid 
Commonwealth, School Tuition 
Commonwealth, Industrial School 
Commonwealth, Mothers' Aid 
Commonwealth, Temporary Aid 

Commonwealth, Highway Commission, Lowell Street 
Commonwealth, Highway Commission, Moth Work 
Commonwealth, Hawker's License 
Essex County, Lowell Street 
Essex County, Dog Tax 
Essex County, Killing Dogs 
Essex County, Essex Street Bridge 
Eastern Mass. Street Railway, Excise Tax, 1918 
Andover National Bank, Notes 
Collector's Department, Taxes 
Collector's Department, Interest on Taxes 
Collector's Department, Street Sprinkling 
Collector's Department, Moth Work 
Collector's Department, Interest on Deposits 

Amount carried forward 



$28689.46 


5026 


.59 


356 


.59 


323 


.81 


20816 


.09 


10145 


.28 


25479 


.18 


3700 


.00 


100 


.00 


50.00 


63 


.72 


7551 


.00 


148 


.74 


75 


.96 


837 


.00 


117 


.75 


97 


.87 


2084 


.32 


325 


.82 


:t 12500 


.00 


91 


08 


13. 


00 


12500. 


00 


504. 


14 


32. 


00 


1035. 


94 


272. 


32 


120000. 


00 


256055. 


53 


2350. 


77 


60. 


72 


4332. 


68 


234. 


01 


$515971. 


37 



84 



account with the Town of Andover 



Cr. 

Orders paid 
Schools 

Highway Department 
Lowell Street 
Essex Street Bridge 
Wolcott Ave., 
Park Department 
Street Lighting 
Police Department 
Fire Department 
Brush Fires 

Printing and Stationery 
Insurance 
Miscellaneous 
Town House 
New Boilers 
Town Officers 
Spring Grove Cemetery 
Board of Health 
Moth Work 
Tree Warden 
Public Dump 
Hay Scales 

Interest on Notes and Bonds 
Memorial Day 

Special G. A. R. Appropriation 
Memorial Hall Library 
Memorial Hall Library, Dog Tax 
Almshouse Expenses 
Almshouse Repairs 
Relief Out of Almshouse 
Soldiers' Relief 
State Aid 
Mothers' Aid 

Amount carried forward ■ 



$ 92569 


.45 


61044 


.33 


37500.00 


1025 


.40 


1492 


.37 


1506 


.93 


6574 


.73 


8804 


.67 


20152 


.37 


1100 


.39 


2995 


.71 


2967 


.20 


2459 


.88 


2416 


.07 


2054 


.84 


8529 


.74 


5574 


.64 


2735 


.05 


7135 


.53 


1225 


.30 


75. 


00 


450.04 


15737. 


12 


450. 


00 


100. 


00 


3000. 


00 


504. 


14 


5658. 


09 


478. 


84 


3388. 


49 


940. 


34 


648. 


00 


4430. 


19 


$305724.85 



85 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 



Dr. 

Amount brought forward 
Board of Public Works, Water Rates 
Board of Public Works, Service Pipe 
Board of Public Works, Highway Department 
Board of Public Works, Sidewalk Assessments 
W. C. Crowley, Sealer's Fees 
George A. Higgins, Town Clerk's Fees 
Old Schoolhouse, Ballard Vale, Rents 
Colver J. Stone, Trial Justice, Fines 
Almshouse 

Spring Grove Cemetery, Sale and care of lots, etc, 
Town House, Rents 
Hay Scales 

School Department, Tuition and supplies 
Auto Dealer's License 
Mother's Aid, Towns 
Cities and Towns, Temporary Aid 
Fire Department, Use of horses 
Fire Department, sale of materials 
Sewer Department, Assessments 
Sewer Department, Interest on Assessments 
Sewer Department, House Connections 
Old Colony Trust Company, Sewer Bonds 
Old Colony Trust Company, Premium on Bonds 
Old Colony Trust Company, Accrued Interest on 
Shawsheen Sewer, sale of materials 
Andover National Bank, Interest on Deposits 
Board of Health, Slaughter License 
Board of Health, Garbage Licenses 
Board of Health, Alcohol Licenses 
F. H. Stacey, Milk Inspector 
Phillips Academy, Street Lighting 
Liquor License 
Moth Department, labor 
Tree Warden, labor 
Police Dept., Special Duty 



Total Receipts 



$515971.37 


31416 


.47 


7894 


.09 


5200 


.84 


132 


.00 


63 


.94 


212 


.50 


153. 


00 


223 


.50 


497 


.33 


3099 


.40 


675 


.75 


70.50 


368 


.87 


25 


.00 


647 


.53 


186 


.41 


1499 


18 


76 


.17 


642 


.10 


48 


.70 


1214 


.78 


40000 


.00 


936 


.00 


ids 72 


.22 


5732 


.11 


686 


.53 


1 


.00 


2 


.50 


5 


.00 


7 


.50 


230 


00 


1 


.00 


7. 


50 


165, 


.75 


1041 


10 


$619207.64 



86 



account with the Town of Andover 



Cr. 

Amount brought forward 
Retirement of Veterans 
Redemption 8 Water Bonds 
Redemption 5 Sewer Bonds 
Redemption 5 Andover Loan Act Bonds 
Redemption 6 High School Bonds 
Water Department 
Sewer Department, Maintenance 
Sewer Department, Assessments, Sinking Funds 
Sewer Department, House Connections 
Sewer Department, House Connection, Refund 
Sewer Sinking Funds 
Water Sinking Funds 
Shawsheen Sewer 
County Tax 

Commonwealth State Tax 
Commonwealth Bank Tax 
Commonwealth Highway Tax 
Common wealth Special State Tax 
Commonwealth Poll Tax 
Commonwealth Street Railway Tax 
Andover National Bank Notes 

Total expenditures 
Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1920 
General Fund 
Water Loan 
Sewer Loan 
Sewer Premium 
War Memorial Book 



$305724 


.85 


300 


.00 


8000 


.00 


5000 


.00 


5000 


.00 


6000 


.00 


29840 


.26 


2466 


.28 


442 


.45 


1363. 


03 


106 


.97 


1000 


.00 


750.00 


45651. 


11 


15291 


96 


25900 


00 


2098 


.10 


5423 


.12 


1221 


.00 


5823. 


00 


214. 


05 


120000. 


00 


$587616.18 


22119. 


06 


5026 


.59 


587, 


.59 


858. 


.22 


3000.00 


$619207.64 



87 



Richardson Fund — Shawsheen Village School 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1920 $1317.51 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 66 . 67 



Cr. 



Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 



$1384.18 



Draper Fund — School 

Dr. 

Balance January 1, 1920 $1181.01 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 56.02 



Cr. 
Mabel K. Selden 
Punchard Alumni Association 
Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 



Edward Taylor Fund — Fuel 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1920 $ 273.26 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 



13.82 



Cr. 



Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 



$ 287.08 



Varnum Lincoln Spelling Fund 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1920 $ 531.36 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 25 . 87 



Cr. 



H. C. Sanborn, Supt. of Schools 
Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 



$ 20.00 
537.23 



$1384.18 



$1384.18 







$1237.03 


$ 19 


.30 






150 


.00 






1067 


.73 










$1237 


.03 



$ 287.08 



$ 287.08 



557.23 



$ 557.23 



88 



Isaac Giddings Burial Ground Fund 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1920 $1000.00 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 50.62 



Cr. 
F. H. Foster, Treas., South Cemetery 50.62 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 1000.00 



$1050.62 



$1050.62 



Cemetery Funds 

Perpetual Care 

Dr. 
Balance, January 1, 1920 
Andover Savings Bank, interest 
Deposits for Perpetual Care 
Andover National Bank Stock 
Andover National Bank Dividends 
Cash 

Cr. 
Spring Grove Cemetery, for care of lots 
Private Cemeteries, for care of lots 
Deposits, Andover Savings Bank 
Andover National Bank Stock 
Cash 



121632. 


.88 


1154. 


01 


2875. 


00 


200 


00 


16. 


00 


70 


00 


$ 365 


.00 


620 


25 


24686 


.64 


200 


00 


76 


.00 



$25947.89 



$25947.89 



89 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Selectmen of the Town of Andover. 

Gentlemen : ■ — I submit the following report of the Andover 
Fire Department from December 31, 1919, to December 31, 1920. 

During this time the Department has answered 85 bell alarms 
and 11 still alarms. We have laid 3200 feet of 2^ in. hose and 
2050 feet of 3-4 in. hose. 

Value of buildings and contents where fires have occurred, 
$17,500.00. 

Loss on buildings $7500. 

Insurance on same $9200. 

The Department consists of One Combination Chemical Truck. 
One Combination Pump and Chemical Truck. One fourth class 
Fire Engine. One two horse Hose Wagon. One two horse Lad- 
der Truck, and one spare Hose Wagon. Four Horses. Four sets 
Harness. Two Carts. There are 4650 feet of 2 3^2 inch hose in 
good condition. 

The Fire Alarm has been causing considerable trouble from 
poor wire. This wire has been in service for the past twenty 
years and should be replaced at once. 

The earnings of the Horses and Drivers for the year are $1266.30. 
We recommend that the sum of $23500 be appropriated for the 
use of the Fire Department. We also recommend the purchase of 
an Auto Ladder Truck and selling the Horses at the Central 
Station. 

CHARLES F. EMERSON, 

Chief Engineer. 



90 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



The Board of Health desires to bring to your notice what seems 
to be a most decided and desirable advance in the fundamental 
principle of its work, the conservation of Public Health. This 
has been brought about in a great measure by the appointment of 
a Board of Health Nurse, whose work has not only met with our 
hearty approval, but has been a great addition to the work of 
general nursing so well carried on by the District Nurse. The 
work has been so divided as to make the one supplemental to the 
other, thus avoiding the overlapping of both time and energy. A 
very marked advance has been made in one department which 
stands out prominently, that of Tuberculosis, in which more 
time has been given to individual cases, and has made pos- 
sible the discovery of many new, and so called incipient cases. 
We are now able, as never before, to take advantage of the 
clinical work offered at North Reading, and the public clinics at 
Lawrence. The demonstration of Tuberculosis in the young has 
been a factor which is a step in the direction of elimination of the 
dread disease, and one which may well call for the hearty support 
of our townspeople. In other ways it has been a factor in the edu- 
cation of the public as to the curability of the disease when dis- 
covered and properly cared for in its early stages. It has also 
made the problem of Sanatorium treatment much easier. Our 
people now recognize the fact that a Tuberculosis Hospital is not 
merely a place of isolation, but is for the ultimate cure of the 
patient ; the protection of the public, as well as the protection of 
the patient, now go hand in hand. 

The elimination of the cases of infectious and contagious dis- 
eases from the District Nurse has allowed more time for inside 
nursing and social work. Thus as throughout the State, the 
duties of the social worker, as exemplified in the work of Miss 

91 



Campbell, can be given greater prominence. The work of Mrs. 
Johnson in tabulating statistics, by card indices and general 
clinical work, which does not show in this report, has been of great 
value not only to your local Board, but carries out more fully the 
work as suggested by the State Department of Health. 

Your Board has also been able this year to carry out more di- 
rectly the general sanitary problems of the town that are con- 
stantly brought to our attention. Much latitude was given in 
the rules of your Board during the World War in regard to the 
keeping of hogs, and such matters as seemed to aid in the conser- 
vation of food, but under the general supervision of our nurse, 
who was given the power of special agent of the Board, these 
matters have been conducted in a manner so that it has been no 
detriment to the health of the town. In other matters pertaining 
to the general welfare of the town we are gradually equipping a 
laboratory in the Board of Health Room in the Town House for 
the examination of milk, ice cream, butter, etc., and trust that 
such expenditure of money as may be made from time to time 
may be made judiciously, and in a manner to meet with your 
appropriation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANKLIN H. STACEY 
CHARLES E. ABBOTT, M. D. 
BANCROFT T. HAYNES 

Board of Health 



92 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH NURSE 

To the Board of Health. 

Gentlemen : — 

I present the following report of my work as Board of Health 
Nurse from May 1 to December 31, 1920. Number of patients 
visited 230; number of calls 810. 

The number of contagious diseases reported for the year was 
302, classified as follows: 



Influenza 


171 


Tuberculosis 


18 


Encephalitis Lethargica 


1 


Anterior Poliomyelitis 


6 


Typhoid Fever 


2 


Scarlet Fever 


8 


Diphtheria 


15 


Chicken Pox 


20 


Whooping Cough 


17 


Measles 


31 


Mumps 


13 




302 


Miscellaneous Calls 




Emergencies 


9 


Surgical Dressings 


11 


Removed from Hospitals 


1 


Taken to Hospitals 


3 


To Venereal Clinic, Lawrence 


2 


To Clinic at North Reading 


4 


Cultures for Diphtheria and release 


80 


Erysipelas cases visited 


3 


Carcinoma 


1 



Attended New England Tuberculosis conference at Manches- 
ter, N. H., Dr. Pratt's Class at Mass. General Hospital and four 
Public Health Nurse meetings in New England. 

My other work keeping all records, issuing licenses, etc. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOTTA M. JOHNSON, R. N. 
93 



AUDITORS' CERTIFICATE 



We have examined the accounts of the several town officers 
and find them correctly cast, with satisfactory vouchers for all 
payments. 

The Town Treasurer has on deposit in Andover National 
Bank and cash on hand: 

General Fund $22119.06 

Water Loan 5026.59 

Sewer Loan 587 . 59 

Sewer Premiums 858.22 

War Memorial Book 3000 . 00 



$31591.46 

JOHN S. ROBERTSON 
WALTER H. COLEMAN 
HARRY SELLARS 

A u&itors 



94 



REPORT OF SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 



I herewith present my report for the year ending December 
31, 1920. 

During the past year no unusual problems have arisen. 

Miss More ton has continued her work as school nurse in a 
highly satisfactory way. 

There have been no serious epidemics and in general the health 
conditions among the scholars has been good. During the fall 
term three or four cases of diphtheria occurred at the Indian Ridge 
School and, in cooperation with the Board of Health, cultures 
were taken from the throats and noses of all the children in this 
building with the result that one "carrier" was found and ex- 
cluded. No more cases occurred. Anterior poliomyelitis was 
epidemic in the autumn but no cases were found among school 
children. There have been occasional cases of other contagious 
diseases and these have been promptly excluded and quarantined 
at home. 

A dental clinic is soon to be started in our schools under the 
supervision of the Red Cross and this is indeed a long step in the 
right direction. It is no exaggeration to say that 95% of our 
children have defective teeth and need dental care. Wallin 
claims that merely making dental repairs on a group of children 
raised their efficiency in the school 57%. 

During the war, figures of the draft showed that one out of 
every three boys was physically unfit for service and that the 
percentage of those rejected in Massachusetts was larger than 
the average for the country. In the connection it seems to me 
that further effort is needed. We have done much in preventing 
the spread of contagious diseases, in eliminating handicaps such 
as enlarged tonsils, etc., but we must go further and do con- 
structive work to build up our children physically as well as men- 
tally. Some properly conducted course of physical training in 
connection with our school work would be a great help. In New 
York State there has been marked improvement in the physical 
condition of the school children since physical training has been 
adopted. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. D. WALKER 



CORNELL FUND 



Receipts 






Amount of Fund 




$5000.00 


Deposited in Savings Banks 




5000.00 


Income 






Balance from last account 


$180.79 




Income 


245 . 00 


425.79 


Expenditures 




Paid for coal and wood 


S328.02 




Balance on hand 


97.77 


19s 7Q 



W. D. WALKER 
C. N. MARLAND 
JOHN C. ANGUS 

Trustees 



96 



PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 



Rev. CHARLES W. HENRY, President 

HARRY H. NOYES, Treasurer 
Rev. £. VICTOR BIGELOW MYRON E. GUTTERSON 
Rev. NEWMAN MATTHEWS FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 



97 



REPORT OF TREASURER 



PRINCIPAL FUND 
January 1, 1920 

Cash in banks $ 4303.42 

Real estate, mortgages and bonds 72150.86 

Transferred from income account 200.00 

December 31, 1920 

Cash in Banks 7677.16 

Real Estate, Mortgages and Bonds 68977. 12 



$76654.28 



January 1, 1920 

Cash in' banks 4303 . 42 

Mortgages paid during year 10156. 76 

Transferred from income account 200.00 

December 31, 1920 

Cash in banks 7677. 16 
Invested in new mortgages and bonds 6983 . 02 

INCOME 

January 1, 1920 

Cash in bank 1808.67 

Interest 4206.98 

EXPENDITURES 

N. C. Hamblin, Principal 800.00 

Edna S. Bennett, instructor 918.66 

Marjorie W. Faunce, instructor 130.00 

Helen M. Dunn, instructor 1383.66 

Hazel Underwood, instructor 480.00 

Ruth R. Hamblin, instructor 9.00 

City of Boston 4.50 

Smart & Flagg, insurance 10.00 

Rogers & Angus, insurance 25.00 



76654.28 



14660.18 



14660.18 



6015.65 



A mount carried forward 



$3760.82 



98 



Amount brought forward \ 


$3760.82 




Andover National Bank, box rent 


5.00 




Andover National Bank, int. on bonds 


55.54 




J. H. Playdon, flowers 


30.00 




Colver J. Stone, legal services 


11.00 




Harry H. Noyes, treasurer 


200.00 




N. C. Hamblin, travel 


15.95 




Expenses, travel, postage, stat'y, etc. 


22.84 




City of Boston, taxes 


52.96 




Transferred to principal account 


200.00 




Cash in bank 


1661.54 


$6015.65 






BARNARD FUND 






January 1, 1920 






Cash in bank 


25.50 




Dividends 


40.00 


65.50 






Prizes awarded 






First 


20.00 




Second 


12.00 




Third 


8.00 




December 31st Cash in Bank 


25.50 


65.50 






DRAPER FUND 






January 1, 1920 






Cash in bank 


1334.70 




Dividends 


67.55 


1402.25 






GOLDSMITH FUND 






January 1, 1920 






Cash in bank * 


267.33 




Dividends 


12.99 


280.32 






Prizes awarded 






Girls' prizes ■ — January and December 


10.00 




Boys' prizes — • January and December 


10.00 




December 31st Cash in bank 


260.32 


280.32 






HARRY H. 


NOYES, 


Treasurer 



99 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TOWN FARM 



At the annual town meeting in 1919 a committee was ap- 
pointed to consider what disposition should be made of the prop- 
erty known as the Andover Town Farm, or what changes might 
wisely be recommended in the management of the same. The 
Chairman of the Board of Selectmen was a member of that 
committee, and his death occurring during the year made it wise 
that action should be deferred until the vacancy was filled. The 
committee was therefore continued subject to the filling of the 
vacancy caused by the death of Mr. Eames. Following the 
meeting of 1920 the vacancy was filled by the appointment of 
WalterS. Donald, Chairman, Board of Selectmen. The committee 
has given careful consideration to the subject, first considering the 
importance of continuing the maintenance of a town home as an 
exclusive Andover institution and second, as to the better pro- 
cedure to be followed in using the present property. 

While the number of inmates is constantly changing, and had 
for some time remained at a low figure, recent depressed condi- 
tions have resulted in adding to the number, so that it is pretty 
definitely determined that accommodations must be made for the 
poor of the town, that will provide for not less than twenty per- 
sons. Considering the proposition of combining with a neighbor- 
ing town for the maintenance of a joint institution, the com- 
mittee believes this unwise, irrespective of the possible saving of 
money that might follow such a combination. Joint operation 
would undoubtedly be accompanied by friction between the 
over-seeing factors, and consequent unsatisfactory conditions for 
the inmates. The committee therefore expresses the unanimous 
opinion that the town must continue to maintain and operate a 
town house for the poor of Andover. 

Considering the matter of selling the present plant, embracing 
313^2 acres, and the various buildings well known to the people of 

100 



the town, it would undoubtedly be to the advantage of the town 
if a more compact and modern building could be constructed 
entirely apart from any farming activities for such service as the 
town home should provide. To construct such a building at the 
present time would involve the expenditure of a sum of money 
much in excess of any amount that has been suggested as the 
probable payment the town would receive if the present property 
were sold. The committee believes, therefore, that it is not wise 
at the present time to dispose of the town farm in its entirety. 

Considering the main building as a building capable of improve- 
ment for use as a home, apart from farm activities, it would be 
possible to spend an amount of approximately $12000 to $15000 
in remodelling the present main building for an institution that 
would care for the needs of the town for some time to come. 
Such remodelling should provide for removing all the outbuildings 
except those absolutely necessary for service to the main building 
itself, and arranging streets and driveways so that the main 
building may have a proper setting. After such an arrangement 
had been made it would be possible to sell the larger part of the 
land for a price that would undoubtedly care for all the improve- 
ments that would be required to make the plant thus remodelled 
an efficient and satisfactory home. 

The committee recommends that the Selectmen be authorized 
to offer for sale at public sale all of the surplus land not needed 
for such improvement as has been suggested, and that they be 
authorized to expend out of the amount secured from the sale, 
such money as may be necessary to satisfactorily remodel and 
improve the present main town farm building. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN N. COLE, Chairman 
FRANK A. BUTTRICK 
WALTER S. DONALD 



101 



TOWN WARRANT 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ss.: To either of the Constables of the Town of An- 
dover: Greeting. 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to 
vote in town affairs to meet and assemble at the Town House, in 
said Andover, on Monday, the seventh day of March, 1921, at 
6 o'clock a.m., to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To choose a Moderator for one year, Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for one 
year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, one 
member of the Board of Assessors for three years, three members 
of the School Committee for three years, two members of the 
Board of Public Works for three years, one member of the Board 
of Health for three years, three Auditors of Accounts for one 
year, three Constables for one year, one Trustee of Memorial Hall 
Library for seven years, one Tree Warden for one year, one 
Trustee of Cornell Fund for three years, two Trustees of Punch- 
ard Free School for one year, and any other officers the town may 
determine to choose. 

Article 2. — To take action on the following question, Shall 
licenses be granted for the sale of certain non-intoxicating bever- 
ages in this town? 

Article 3. — To determine what sums of money shall be appro- 
priated for Almshouse Expenses, Repairs on Almshouse, Relief 
out of Almshouse, Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children, 
Board of Health, Brush Fires, Fire Department, Hay Scales, 

102 



Highway Department, Insurance, Interest, Memorial Hall 
Library, Memorial Day, Post 99, G. A. R., Miscellaneous, Parks 
and Playsteads, Police, Printing and Stationery, Public Dump, 
Retirement of Veterans, Redemption of Water, Sewer, and High 
School Bonds, Schools, Sewer Maintenance, Sewer Sinking 
Funds, Soldiers' Relief, Spring Grove Cemetery, State Aid, 
Street Lighting, Town Officers, Town House, Tree Warden, Moth 
Department, Water Maintenance, Construction and Sinking 
Funds, and other town charges and expenses. 

vXArticle 4. — To see if the Town will vote to build a main sewer 
on Poor Street and North Main Street, a distance of about 1800 
feet, and appropriate the sum of $3500 for same. Work to be done 
under the direction of the Board of Public Works, and to assess 
betterments upon the estates benefited by said extension, on 
petition of Carl L. Svenson and others. 

'Article 5. — To see if the Town will vote to build a sewer from 
[ain Street, westerly through Lowell Street as far as the house 

of Richard Ward, and appropriate a sum of money therefor, on 

petition of Walter M. Lamont and others. 

i/ Article 6. — To see if the Town will vote to build a sewer 
through Haverhill Street from the present sewer at the intersec- 
tion of York Street, easterly for a distance of about 2300 feet to 
a point at or near Stirling Street, and appropriate a sum of money 
therefor on petition of John Traynor and others. 



Mail 



Article 7. — To see if the town will accept and adopt as a part 
of its sewage system, certain sewers constructed in Shawsheen 
Village, so called, as follows : — A ten inch sewer on Haverhill 
Street extending from the Main Sewer west of the Haverhill 
Street bridge to the centre of York Street and an eight inch sewer 
on North Main Street starting at a point at or near the property 
of Dr. George B. Elliott and running southerly along North Main 
Street and connecting with the Main sewer ; also when completed 
the sewage pumping station at Shawsheen Village and the 12 inch 
main extending to the filter beds. 

Article 8. — To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to make investigations and report at the next An- 

103 



nual Meeting on a system of sewage disposal and appropriate the 
sum of one thousand dollars to defray the expenses of such inves- 
tigation, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 9. — To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to expend the amount of money now in the treas- 
ury to the credit of the Water Loan for the purpose of relaying 
pipes and making small extensions, on petition of the Board of 
Public Works. 

Article 10. — To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to extend the water main from the residence of 
Charles G. E. Anderson, Ballardvale Road, to Edward Dimmock, 
and appropriate a sum of money therefor, on petition of Charles 
G. E. Anderson and others. 

Article 11. — To see if the Town will appropriate a sum not 
exceeding $5000, to complete the macadam on Lowell Street; the 
same to equal an amount which the State and County will sever- 
ally appropriate, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 12. — To hear and act on the report of the committee 
appointed to consider the sale of the Andover Town Farm, or 
change in method of operating the same. 

Article 13. — To hear and act upon the report of the committee 
appointed to consider the question of a suitable memorial to 
citizens of Andover who served in the World War, the questions 
for consideration to be as follows: 

(a) Will the town approve the recommendation that 
the said memorial shall take the form of a new civic cen- 
tre on the land bounded by Main Street, Chestnut 
Street, Bartlet Street and Punchard Avenue ? 

(b) Will the town authorize the Selectmen to petition 
the General Court for authority to appropriate, outside 
of the debt limit now authorized by law, a sum of mon- 
ey not exceeding $300,000, to be used for the purpose of 
acquiring and improving said area, and the erection of 
such buildings as shall be authorized ? 

104 



(c) Will the town authorize the appointment of a 
committee of seven citizens to be known as a "Com- 
mittee on War Memorial and Civic Centre," to make a 
study of all conditions involved in a proper development 
of such a civic centre, prepare plans for a beginning of 
the undertaking, to include the immediate construction 
of a new town building, designed to be later supple- 
mented by such other development as the town may 
from time to time authorize, and to further consider and 
act upon any matters relating to the question ? 

Article 14. — To hear and act on the report of the Board of 
Public Works as to its conclusions and recommendations on the 
status of the Water Department, covering the question of rates, 
charges for fire service and other public services, and the advisa- 
bility of having this Department operated as a self-supporting 
Department. 



^ 



Article 15. — To see if the town will accept as a town way, 
as laid out by the Selectmen, the street now known as Warwick 
Street in Shawsheen Village, so called, running from a point on 
North Main Street northerly about eleven hundred (1100) feet 
from the Post Office and westerly to Poor Street, on petition of 
William M. Wood and others. 



Article 16. — To see if the town will accept as a town way, as 
laid out by the Selectmen, the street now known as Windsor 
Street in Shawsheen Village, so called, running from a point on 
North Main Street northerly about seven hundred (700) feet 
from the Post Office and westerly to Poor Street, opposite the 
residence of Henry Todd, on petition of William M. Wood and 
others. 

Article 17. — To see if the Town will accept as a town way, as 
laid out by the Selectmen, the street known as Canterbury Street 
in Shawsheen Village, so called, from a point south of 59 Lowell 
Street, westerly six hundred (600) feet to an open lot, on petition 
of William M. Wood and others. 

105 



Article 18. — To see if the town will accept as a town way, as 
laid out by the Selectmen, the street known as Balmoral Street in 
Shawsheen Village, so called, from a point on North Main Street 
about five hundred (500) feet southerly from the Post Office to 
Burnham Road, on petition of William M. Wood and others. 

Article 19. — To see whether the Town will vote to instruct the 
Selectmen to release a certain right of way for the maintenance of 
drainage pipes over the premises of Albert L. Hall and Clyde A. 
White, located on the northerly side of Park Street, in said An- 
dover, upon such terms and conditions as may be acceptable to 
the Board of Selectmen and to the Board of Public Works, on 
petition of Albert L. Hall and others. 

Article 20. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$2000, to place fire escapes on and otherwise put in a suitable 
condition the Old Schoolhouse building in Ballardvale to com- 
ply with the regulations and orders of the Building Inspectors' 
Department of the State Police. 

Article 21. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$6000 for tearing down and reconstructing the tomb in Spring 
Grove Cemetery, on petition of the Board of Trustees. 

Article 22. — To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen 
to dispose of the Steam Fire Engine now located in the Central 
Fire Station. 

Article 23. — To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of 
money to place an electric light on Salem Street between Prospect 
Hill Road and the Woodbridge Cider Mill, on petition of Ernest 
A. Braddpn and others. 

Article 24. — To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money for an electric light in front of the Tyer Rubber Company, 
on petition of Dionisio Michelini and others. 

Article 25. — To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of 
money to place a fire alarm box at or near the junction of Salem 

106 



Street and Prospect Hill Road, on petition of Ernest A. Braddon 
and others. 

Article 26. — To see if the town will accept the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 94, Section 120, as follows: — 

"In towns having less than ten thousand inhabitants 
which accept this Section or have accepted corresponding 
provisions of earlier laws at any Annual Town Meeting, 
the annual license fee for carrying on the business of 
slaughtering neat cattle, sheep or swine shall be such sum 
not exceeding one hundred dollars as the selectmen fix, 
on petition of the Board of Health." 

Article 27. — : To see if the Town will name as Chestnut Lane 
the town way leading from River Road at a point east of the 
Shattuck Farm past the property of Jane Devlin. 

Article 28. — To see what action the Town will take in regard 
to a certain fund left by the late Anna Holt for the. benefit of the 
Scotland District School and held in trust by Brooks F. Holt. 

Article 29. — To see if the Town will accept as a gift from the 
late Edward R. Lemon, a native of Andover, an oil painting of 
" Washington at Monmouth" and a bust of Longfellow. 

Article 30. — To fix the pay of the call firemen for the ensuing 
year. 

Article 31. — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 32. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in anticipation of the revenue of the cur- 
rent financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

Article 33. — To determine what disposition shall be made of 
unexpended appropriations. 

Article 34. — To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

107 



Article 35. — To determine the amount of money to be raised 
by taxation the ensuing year. 

Article 36. — To transact any other business that may le- 
gally come before the meeting. 

The polls will be open from 6 o'clock a.m. to 5 o'clock p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof, seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your do- 
ings thereon, at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this twenty-third day of February, A.D. 
1921. 

WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Selectmen of A ndover 



108 



RECOMMENDATIONS OF FINANCE 
COMMITTEE 



The Finance Committee appointed by the moderator at the 
Town Meeting last March comprised the following: George 
Abbot, Henry A. Bodwell, John H. Campion, William B. Corliss, 
E. V. French, George B. Frost and Chester W. Holland. The 
Committed organized with Mr. Bodwell Chairman and Mr. 
French Secretary. During the year Mr. Frost and Mr. Corliss 
resigned and the Committee selected George L. Averill and John 
C. Angus to fill the vacancies. Eight meetings have been held 
to consider the matters which are to come before the Town at the 
March Meeting and conferences have been held with the officials 
of every town department. 

The Committee has given careful consideration to the budgets 
prepared by the various town departments and has examined in 
detail the appropriations requested ; the results of this examina- 
tion are embodied in the recommendations presented herewith. 

The cost of maintaining the different town departments in- 
creases yearly and there is little prospect that the coming years 
will see anything other than steady increase in expense of main- 
tenance and administration. However, the situation warrants 
that the Finance Committee should make an examination dur- 
ing the coming year to the end that the citizens maybe advised in 
accurate detail of the exact condition of affairs in every town de- 
partment. As a result of such an examination it is the confident 
expectation of the present Finance Committee, that many changes 
will suggest themselves, which, if adopted, will make for a saving 
in money and an increased efficiency in operation. 

109 



Recommendations 
Almshouse $5000.00 

Almshouse repairs 300.00 

Almshouse relief out 4000 . 00 

Aiding Mothers with dependent children 2500.00 

Board of Health 3000 . 00 

Brush Fires 600.00 

Fire Department 23000.00 

(This amount will cover $835.90 already spent in 
Shawsheen Village in putting fire alarm wires 
underground and provides $1000 for renewing 
in other parts of the town overhead wires which 
are rusting out. About one-half the total cost 
of the department is due to wages of the perman- 
ent men in part made necessary by the two- 
platoon system. No immediate change is possible 
but the Committee recommends consideration at 
once of such changes in the present methods of 
operating the Department as may be found pos- 
sible after careful study, and believes that it will 
probably be feasible to maintain a thoroughly 
efficient department at an appreciable saving in 
cost. 
Hay Scales 125.00 

Highway Department 

Maintenance 30000.00 

New Construction 30000 . 00 

(The general plan of new construction proposed 
by the Board of Public Works a year ago and ap- 
proved, was of necessity changed on account of 
the assumption of the larger part of the Main 
Street work by the State and on account of the 
agreement between the State, the County and 
the Town to finish Lowell Street at an earlier 
date than originally planned. The Board of 
Public Works propose in 1921 to do new con- 



Amount carried forward 



$98525.00 



110 



Amount brought forward $98525 . 00 

struction work on the following streets : A ndover 
Street to Ballardvale, Lowell Street, Summer 
Street, Abbot Street, Phillips Street, Pearson 
Street and ashes on country roads. This work 
will be done in the order found most advanta- 
geous and only about three-fifths of it can be fin- 
ished this year. The rebuilding of Main Street 
from Chapel Avenue to the Square will have to 
be still deferred until the street railroad com- 
pany is in a position to do the track work neces- 
sary. In the meantime, it is stated that the street 
can be kept in fairly good condition by a moder- 
ate outlay for repairs.) 
Fire Insurance 3000.00 

(This increase of $1000 over the appropriation of 
last year provides for increased coverage in ac- 
cordance with the new appraisal which has been 
made of all town property.) 
Workmen's Compensation 2500.00 

Interest 17500.00 

Library 3000.00 

Memorial Day 600 . 00 

(The increased cost of music, flowers, conveyan- 
ces and all the other items entering into- the Me- 
morial Day observance makes necessary a larger 
appropriation than has been made in past years. 
G. A. R. 100.00 

Miscellaneous 3000.00 

Parks and Playsteads 1200.00 

Police 9000.00 

(One new officer who shall act as a night watch- 
man in Shawsheen Village is provided for in this 
appropriation as recommended.) 
Printing and Stationery 1800 . 00 



Amount carried forward $140225.00 

111 



Amount brought forward $140225 . 00 

Public Dump 75.00 

Retirement of Veterans 300 . 00; 

Retirement of Bonds 

Water 8000. 00 ' 

Punchard School 6000 . 00' 

Sewer 6141.78 

Schools 101000.00, 

(This is the gross expenditure recommended for 
the school department. Against this there are 
certain credits which if placed to the credit of the 
School Department would make the net cost ap- 
proximately $94,000. The recommendation of 
the Finance Committee does not include the sum 
requested by the School Department for the em- 
ployment of a physical training teacher.) 
Sewer Department 

Labor and Power 3000 . 00 

Sinking Fund 1000.00 

Soldiers' Relief 1500.00 

Spring Grove Cemetery 1500.00 

(and receipts) 
State Aid 1000.00 

Street Lighting 7900 . 00 

(The Lighting .Committee plans for various chan- 
ges in the street lighting arrangements and also 
increased lighting in several sections. The Fi- 
nance Committee recommends that the congested 
sections of the town be adequately provided for 
and that uniformity of lighting over the town 
should be the aim in the plans of the Lighting 
Committee.) 
Town Officers 8900.00 

(This is a slight increase over last year, recom- 
mended in order to increase the pay of the audi- 
tors from $75.00 to $100.00 a year.) 

Amount carried forward $286541 . 7& 

112 



Amount brought forward $286541 . 78 

Town House 3000.00 
Tree Warden and Moth Work 7000 . 00 
(The Town is required by the State to spend this 
year $4000 for moth work. It is found that the 
growth of brush along the roadsides is getting 
ahead of the cutting, necessitating an increase 
from $1000 to $3000 for this work. This road- 
side cutting and other care of trees in the town is 
exclusively in the charge of the tree warden, who 
is elected by the voters of the town. The moth 
work is in charge of a superintendent appointed 
by the selectmen. The control of moths and the 
work on the trees are so related that the tree 
warden and moth superintendent should be the 
same man and this is now the arrangement in 
Andover. It is believed that both these lines of 
work have somewhat outgrown the earlier con- 
ditions, and that they are in part so allied with 
the Highway Department of the Board of Pub- 
lic Works that a closer connection between the 
two should be made if possible, thus permitting 
the use of the Highway equipment wherever 
available and insuring the care of all tools by a 
permanent department having proper means for 
storage and repair work.) 
Water Department 20750 . 00 
(It is advised that the method of handling the 
Water Department recommended by the special 
committee be adopted and this will make un- 
necessary after this year an appropriation for the 
retirement of bonds, sinking fund, interest, main- 
tenance and construction, and will cover all re- 
quirements by a single appropriation.) 

$317291.78 

The Finance Committee respectfully recommends the fol- 
lowing action in reference to the articles in the warrant: — 
Article 4. Approved. 

113 



Article 5. Approved. 

Article 6. Approved. 

(It is recommended that the town issue bonds in the neces- 
sary amount to cover the construction of sewers called for 
in these three articles; but it is further recommended that 
the Board of Public Works defer until' another year, such 
part of this work as may advantageously be postponed in 
view of the prospect of lowered costs.) 

Article 7. Approved. 

Article 8. Approved. 

Article 9. Approved. 

(It is recommended that no part of this sum be used for any 
considerable extension work until such has been approved 
by the town.) 

Article 10. Not approved. 

(The cost of this water extension is estimated about $1200.00 
and the line will furnish water for one house. The revenue 
from this extension and the prospective development of the 
section does not in the opinion of the Finance Committee 
warrant the cost.) 

Article 11. Approved. 

Article 12. The plan incorporated in the report of the committee 
which has investigated the Town Farm situation is ap- 
proved by the Finance Committee. 

Article 13. No final action recommended at this time. 

(The Committee appointed to consider this matter at the 
Annual Town meeting a year ago recommend the adoption 
of the general plan then described and action providing for 
the issuing of $300000 in bonds. The Finance Committee 
appreciate the advantage to a community which may come 
through a broad vision as to the probable future needs 

114 



and from the preparation of a comprehensive far-sighted 
plan in accord with which developments may be made to 
the end that the final result may be a complete work best 
fitting the conditions and the needs of the community. The 
information presented to the Finance Committee, however, 
was not sufficiently detailed and comprehensive to make 
it possible at this time to judge reasonably of the ultimate 
cost, or of the wisdom of proceeding in exactly these lines. 
It is, therefore, recommended that no definite action be 
taken other than to provide for the continuation of a com- 
mittee to study the matter further and report on all de- 
tails with definite estimates and full working out of the 
preliminaries so that the final result may be estimated with 
approximate accuracy.) 

Article 14. Approved. 

Article 15. Approved. 

Article 16. Approved. 

Article 17. Approved. 

Article 18. Approved. 

(Articles 15, 16, 17 and 18 refer to petitions for acceptance 
by the Town of certain streets in Shawsheen Village. Three 
of these streets are completed and the fourth, namely Bal- 
moral street, named in Article 18, will be completed by 
private individuals without cost to the Town. The accept- 
ance of Balmoral street includes acceptance of the bridge 
passing over the Shawsheen river at this point. 

Article 19. It is suggested that the interested parties work out 
some plan with the Selectmen and Board of Public Works 
which will conserve the purposes for which the Town ac- 
quired the easement referred to in this article. This should 
involve no cost to the Town. 

Article 20. Approved. 

115 



Article 21. Not approved. 

(The Finance Committee recommends that further plans 
and specifications be presented in reference to this pro- 
posed expenditure.) 

Article 22. Approved. 

Article 23. Referred to Lighting Committee. 

Article 24. Referred to Lighting Committee. 

Article 25. Referred to Selectmen. 

Article 26. Approved. 

Article 27. No action required of Finance Committee. 

Article 28. No action required of Finance Committee. 

Article 29. No action required of Finance Committee. 

Article 30. It is the recommendation of the Finance Committee 
that the call Firemen in Ballardvale be paid $75.00 each 
per year and the call firemen in the Center be paid $150.00 
each yearly. This seems a reasonable adjustment of pay in 
view of the number of alarms answered by each department. 

Articles 31 to 35 inclusive, do not require action on the part of the 
Finance Committee. 

SUMMARY 

Department appropriations recommended $317291 . 78 

Special appropriations recommended 8000.00 



State Tax (estimated) $35000 . 00 

County Tax (estimated) 16000. 00 



$325291.78 



51000.00 



$376291.78 



116 



RESOURCES 



Cash 




$22100 


.00 




Corporation and Bank tax (estimated) 


30000 


00 




State Aid 


<< 


600 


00 




Outside relief 


u 


1600.00 




Water rates 


11 


26500 


00 




Sundries 


<< 


1700.00 




From State for Schools 


it 


7500.00 




Income tax 


ver Taxes 


25000 


00 


<im i cnnn rid 








«p)I lOUUU . UK) 


Total to be raised from Ando 


$261291.78 


VALUATION 








1919 


1920 






1921 (est.) 


Personal $ 184835.00 


$ 2042541.00 


$ 2042541.00 


Real Estate 6639050.00 


8044225.00 


$ 


8344225.00 


$8487400.00 


$10086766.00 


L 0386766. 00 



Computation of tax rate using these figures. 
$261291 

$10386788 ' " * $25 ' 15 



Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY A. BODWELL, Chairman 

GEORGE ABBOT 

GEORGE L. AVERILL 

JOHN H. CAMPION 

E. V. FRENCH 

C. W. HOLLAND 

JOHN C. ANGUS, Secretary 

Finance Committee. 



117 



TRUSTEES OF 
MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



E. KENDALL JENKINS ALFRED E. STEARNS 

FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL BURTON S. FLAGG 

CHARLES U. BELL NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 

FREDERICK A. WILSON 

President 
E. KENDALL JENKINS 

Secretary and Treasurer 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 

Librarian 
EDNA A. BROWN 

A ssistants 
JULIA E. TWICHELL EDITH DONALD 

In Charge of Ballardvale Branch 
MARTHA D. BYINGTON 

Janitor 
ROBERT DEYERMOND 



118 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BOARD 

OF TRUSTEES 



The Trustees of the Memorial Hall Library herewith submit 
their report for the year 1920: 

Any extended statement from them is rendered unnecessary by 
the full and suggestive reports of the Librarian and of the Trea- 
surer, which all the citizens are urged to read. 

The large increase in the circulation of the books of the library 
and in the use for reference give evidence of its growing impor- 
tance as an educating influence in our midst. 

Its value to the community depends not merely upon the num- 
ber and quality of its books but also upon the wise use of them. 
The lectures given by the Librarian to High School pupils upon 
the use of reference books and upon the classification of books are 
proving of much value, especially to those who become teachers. 

Worthy of special note is the gift to the library of more than 
one hundred volumes which have been used in army camps at 
home and abroad. They deal chiefly with technical subjects 
such as farming, the care of animals, chemistry, engineering, rub- 
ber working and business, and many of our citizens are finding 
them helpful in their occupations. 

The generous donation of books from one of our fellow-towns- 
men, mentioned in the Librarian's report, may well be imitated by 
others who reduce their libraries or change their residence. 

The recent death of Rev. Francis H. Johnson recalls to our 
minds the long period of service which he gave as a Trustee of 
the Library, dating from its beginning in 1872 to 1909. 

An active and influential member of the Board during the 
formative period of the Library, his activities and influence found 

119 



their culmination in the Cornell Art Gallery, the entire contents of 

which were purchased by him during his travels in this country 

and abroad. Upon the completion of this duty he resigned from 

the Board. 

The Library was fortunate in having such a man on its Board of 

Trustees at two important periods in its history. 

The "high cost of living" inevitably affects libraries, as is seen 

in the advancing price of books and in the necessary increase of 

salaries. 

It is hoped that the town will show its appreciation of the 

library by a no less generous appropriation for its needs in 1921 

than it voted last year. 

E. KENDALL JENKINS 

Chairman 
NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 
CHARLES U. BELL 
ALFRED E. STEARNS 
BURTON S. FLAGG 
FREDERICK A. WILSON 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 



120 



TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 
In account with the Town of Andover, Mass. 



RECEIPTS 



Balance from last year 

Town Appropriation 

Dog Tax 

Income from Investments 

Fines 

Cash paid for lost books 

Gifts for books and periodicals 



Total 

Salaries 

Lighting and Heating 

Periodicals 

Bookbinding 

Books 

Insurance 

Office Expenses 

Sundry Items 

Cash on hand 



EXPENDITURES 



$2001.22 

3000 00 

504.14 

3299.73 

199.27 

20.40 

26.50 

$9051.26 

$4343.00 
639.44 
206.45 
275.29 
715.33 
126.99 
92.99 
217.19 
2434.58 



Total 



$9051.26 



121 



Classification of Income and Expenditures for the year 1920 





INCOME 








Maint. 


Book 


Cornell 


Total 


Income from Investments 


$2126.59 


$827.64 


$345.50 


$3299 . 73 


Town Appropriation 


3000.00 






3000.00 


Dog Tax 


504.14 






504.14 


Cash for lost books 




20.40 




20.40 


Fines 


199.27 






199.27 


Gifts 


6.50 


20.00 




26.50 



Total 



$5836.50 $868.04 $345.50 $7050.04 



EXPENDITURES 



Salaries 


$4240.86 




$102.14 


$4343 . 00 


Lighting and Heating 


539.44 




100.00 


639.44 


Periodicals 


206.45 






206.45 


Bookbinding 


275.29 






275.29 


Books 




715.33 




715.33 


Insurance 


126.99 






126.99 


Office Expenses 


92.99 






92.99 


Sundry Items 


217.19 






217.19 


Total 


$5699.21 


$715.33 


$202.14 


$6616.68 


Unexpended balances 


137.29 


152.71 


143.36 


433.36 



Condition of Funds and Unexpended Income Jan., 1920 



Maintenance Fund 

Book Funds 

Cornell Fund (Permanent) 

Cornell Fund (Purchase) 

Special 

Total income on hand 
Principal cash on hand 

Total cash on hand 
Total Funds 



Funds 


Income 


$46600.00 


$ 8.51 


17400.00 


1164.00 


5000.00 


425.63 


4148.45 


630.35 




64.94 




2293.43 




141.15 




$2434.58 


$73148.45 





122 



INVESTMENTS 

Bangor & Aroostook R. R. 4s 
Boston Elevated Ry. Co., 4s 
Boston Elevated Ry. Co., 4j^s 
Chicago Railway Co., 5s 
Montreal Tramways Co., 5s 
Michigan State Tel. Co., 5s 
Boston & Albany Equip. Trusts, 43^s 
Boston & Maine R. R., 4s 
Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., 5s 
American Tel. & Tel. Co., stock, 4s 
Savings Banks 
Mortgage on Real Estate 
Principal Cash 



$11000. 


00 


10000. 


00 


1000 


.00 


9962 


.50 


9962 


.50 


4981 


.25 


2981 


.10 


2000 


.00 


1000 


.00 


571 


.50 


15548 


.45 


4000 


00 


141 


.15 



Total 



January 31, 1921 



$73148.45 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL, Treas. 



We certify that we have examined and found correct the above 
statement as of January 18, 1921, whereby all securities held 
against the several funds have been examined and the income 
accruing from same accounted for. 

All disbursements are supported by receipts in proper form 
and the cash has been verified and found correct. 

BURTON S. FLAGG 
CHARLES U. BELL 



Auditors 



January 31, 1921 



123 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 



January 12, 1921 

To the Trustees of the Memorial Hall Library: 
Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit the report of the library for the twelve 
months ending December 31, 1920. 

Our circulation during this period has been the largest in the 
history of the library. At the Memorial Hall 37952 books were 
issued, an increase over 1919 of 1937 volumes. At Ballardvale, 
6445 were issued, an increase of 139 during the year. This makes 
a total of 44398 books borrowed for home use during 1920, which 
is a large circulation for a town the size of Andover. In 1919, 
42322 volumes were borrowed. 

Not only the number of books borrowed has increased, but the 
amount of reference work done. During November and Decem- 
ber the demands on the library were especially heavy. It has 
frequently been impossible for one person to answer questions, 
give the children proper supervision and assistance and at the 
same time attend to the loan desk. Extra help has been needed 
during the evenings and will be necessary for some weeks to come. 
A very large number of upper grade and high school pupils use 
the library as a place for quiet study and for help in preparing 
their lessons. The children now growing up have learned that 
the library is the source of information upon any subject and they 
make most gratifying use of its volumes. 

During the early fall the usual lectures were given to the high 
school sophomores on the use of reference books and the classi- 
fication of the library. These lectures always result in increased 
interest in the books spoken of and in personal efforts to use them 
individually. There are young people now teaching in other 

124 



towns who yet turn to this library for help. We have received more 
than one request from girls who in the past attended our reference 
lectures, for help in making out reading lists for their pupils in 
towns where library facilities are less accessible than in Andover. 

The progress of the year has been marked by our usual timely 
and interesting bulletins. These lists are always helpful to 
teachers and children in search of material for special occasions, 
and, as is always the case, we have furnished books for use in 
many of the parties and entertainments, both public and private. 
Just now there is a great interest in amateur acting, and we have 
bought a number of books of simple plays, many of which are 
adapted to use by children. 

The prices of books this year were so increased as to cut down 
the number it was possible to buy from a fund that did not keep 
pace with the mounting cost. The outlook for the coming season 
is not encouraging, since many publishers are announcing even 
more marked increases. Much of the current fiction is priced at 
$2.25 or $2.50, and it remains to be seen whether this increase, 
which scarcely seems justified, can be maintained in the face of 
falling prices in other lines of business. It is a serious matter for 
the libraries, which are suffering from the necessity of considering 
with double care every proposed purchase. 

One of the greatest inconveniences resulting from the shortage 
of paper, the high cost of making books, etc., has been that very 
many desirable publications, especially of a technical nature, have 
gone out of print. It is no longer possible for a publisher to re- 
issue a small edition of a book in response to a limited number of 
demands for copies ; he must be assured of a sale of several thou- 
sands in order to repay the cost of reprinting, and as a result, it 
has become exceedingly difficult to obtain certain books. As is 
always our custom, the library has tried to provide for the local 
clubs the books needed for study during the winter, and to the 
dismay of both the club members and the librarian, it has proved 
a matter of extreme difficulty to secure some of the books most 
wanted. In a few cases we have been able to borrow temporarily 
from other libraries, but in some instances, the club has been 
forced to change its programme. It is to be hoped that this con- 
dition may soon be bettered. 

125 



Fortunately, the library has had an unusual number of gifts. 
Rev. Frank R. Shipman contributed about seventy-five volumes, 
both fiction and non-fiction, all of which were of use in either the 
main library or at Ballard vale. The most important gift of the 
year includes over one hundred books on business and technical 
subjects, which came to the library through the distribution of 
books used in the army camps at home and abroad. Through the 
good offices of the American Library Association, these books 
were sent to some of the central large libraries and then given to 
local libraries in the vicinity. Those which came to Andover were 
distributed by the Haverhill Public Library, whose librarian, Mr. 
John G. Moulton, asked all librarians in the neighborhood to 
inspect the books and to choose those which would be of value in 
their communities. To Andover came books on chemistry and 
rubber working, farming, fruit raising and care of animals, busi- 
ness manuals of varying kinds, and a number of books on auto- 
mobiles and engineering, all of which have had constant and ap- 
preciative use. These books filled a real need, a need which had 
arisen for several reasons, one being that the returned service 
men had learned the use of a library, and become accustomed to 
go to it for help. 

Not only has the initial cost of books increased enormously, but 
the price of rebinding them has actually doubled, due to shortage 
of material and of labor. All books which receive steady use ar- 
rive at the point where they must be put into new covers if they 
are to circulate longer. Our binding bills have mounted up great- 
ly during the year, for it is inevitable that with a larger use of the 
library, an increased number of books have to be rebound or re- 
placed. Only a library with a small circulation can keep its bind- 
ing bills at a minimum. 

Our shelves are yet in a crowded condition, although the con- 
gestion has been relieved in part by the careful sifting of the 
classes relating to science, religion, useful arts and economics, and 
by the withdrawal of books which have had their day and ceased 
to be of use, unless from an historical standpoint. We try to keep 
no dead wood upon our shelves, — only books which are useful. 
Mere hoarding of books, increasing yearly the number of volumes, 
does not seem to us to mark the value of a library. It is rather 

126 



the use which can be made of our books, and we want them to be 
such that people can use them. Not long ago, a stranger came and 
asked for a copy of Wordsworth's poems, stating that in a neigh- 
boring library the only edition offered her was that of 1798 ! The 
library was fortunate in possessing that especial edition, but it 
was not of much practical use. Being so near Boston, where the 
large libraries collect and keep all publications which will later be 
of historical worth, we have felt that our best service to the com- 
munity will be rendered by earnest effort to keep our shelves up- 
to-date, and by discarding books which passing years have robbed 
of value. 

In October, the library sustained a loss in the death of its jani- 
tor, Ray Dearborn. During the trying days of 1918, when so 
few men were available, Mr. Dearborn, who, though of military 
age, was physically incapacitated for active service, came to us 
^vith the quiet statement that he would try to do his- bit by help- 
ing us. His work was done under conditions of increasing ill- 
health, culminating in a sudden death. We are indebted to him 
for bridging over a very difficult period. 

There is not likely to be any drop in the cost of administering 
the library during the year to come. The very fact that it has 
been used so much and shows the largest circulation in its history, 
only emphasizes the need of a generous appropriation to meet its 
legitimate expenses and to make it possible for it to do its proper 
work in the town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDNA A. BROWN 

Librarian 



127 



STATISTICS OF THE LIBRARY 

Number of books issued for home use at the Memorial 

Hall 37953 

Number of books issued at Ballardvale 6445 

Total 44398 

Percentage of fiction circulated 70 

Percentage of non-fiction circulated 30 

Number of borrowers' cards in use 2314 

Books added by purchase 388 

Books added by gift 356 

Total accessions 744 

Books withdrawn, worn out, etc. 602 

Total number of books in library 25006 

Volumes rebound 257 

Volumes bound, periodicals, etc. 64 

BALLARDVALE 

Number of books issued for home use 6445 

Percentage of fiction circulated 80 

Percentage of non-fiction circulated 20 

Number of cards in use 350 

Books added by purchase 73 

Books added by gift 49 

Total accessions 122 

Books now belonging to the branch 1597 

Gifts of books and pamphlets are acknowledged from state and 
government departments, from other libraries, the Andover Vil- 
lage Improvement Society and from the following individuals: 
Franklin Belcour, Jr., Judge Charles U. Bell, E. J. Brown, 
M. T. Byington, the Misses Carter, Mrs. J. F. Cogswell, Edward 
Cook, E. J. David, J. C. Graham, Rev. C. W. Henry, E. F. 
Johnson, Mrs. Maud Howe, Mrs. Andrew Lawrie, Mrs. E. E. 
Mitchell, Frank Munsey, Miss Agnes Park, Mrs. George Ripley, 
George B. Ripley, Rev. F. R. Shipman, Mrs. Peter D. Smith, 
James Stewart, F. D. Stickney and Dr. Roger Tracy. 

128 



INFORMATION FOR USERS OF THE LIBRARY 



The Memorial Hall Library is open every day except Sun- 
days and legal holidays from 9 to 12.30 in the morning, and from 
3 to 9 in the afternoon and evening. 

Any resident of Andover over ten years of age may have a 
library card upon filling out an application blank. Children in 
grades below the Punchard School are required to have their 
applications endorsed by both parent and teacher. 

All grown people are allowed to take any reasonable number 
of books, provided that only one is a seven-day book. The 
Punchard pupils are permitted to borrow two, one fiction and one 
non-fiction. 

Books are issued for fourteen days, the date upon which the 
book is due being stamped plainly on the "date due" slip at the 
time of issue. A book kept overtime incurs a fine of two cents 
for every day overdue. A few of the books most in demand are 
issued for seven days only. All these are labeled upon the book 
pocket, "Seven day book." Books lost or damaged must be 
paid for. 

Seven day books are not renewed or reserved for anyone. 
Other books may be renewed if no one else has asked for them, 
and if a work not fiction is specially desired for any serious 
purpose, notice of its return to the library will be sent on request. 

The shelves of the whole library are open to all grown people. 
The books are arranged according to subjects, and it is often 
much more satisfactory to go to the shelves and examine the 
books than to depend upon the catalogue. 

The only complete index of the contents of the library is the 
card catalogue. The printed catalogue of the books was issued 
many years ago, and is out-of-date, besides containing the names 
of many books which are no longer in the library. The new books 
are listed at intervals in the weekly paper, and cumulated in the 
yearly library report, but the only complete record is the card 

129 



catalogue. This catalogue is arranged alphabetically like a 
dictionary. To find whether any given book is in the library, 
look for it under the surname of the author, or under its title. 
The right-hand drawers of the case contain a second arrange- 
ment of cards where the books are entered according to the 
subjects of which they treat. 

The new books purchased each month are placed for some 
weeks in a special case on the north side of the reading room, so 
that the most recent additions to the library may be found 
there. The library buys only a limited amount of new fiction, 
but it tries to fill the wants of the community in regard to other 
books desired. People are invited to suggest for purchase the 
titles of books they wish. 

The library staff is always glad to answer questions or in any 
way to help visitors find what they want. 



LIST OF PERIODICALS AND NEWSPAPERS TAKEN FOR THE 
READING ROOM 

American monthly review of reviews 

Atlantic monthly 

Blackwood's magazine 

Bookman 

Book review digest 

Catholic world 

Century 

Country gentleman 

Christian Endeavor world (gift) 

Country life in America 

Cumulative book index 

Etude 

Forum 

Garden magazine (gift) 

Guide to nature (gift) 

Harper's magazine 

House beautiful (gift) 

Independent 

India Rubber world (gift) 

130 



International studio (gift) 

Ladies' home journal 

Library journal 

Life 

Literary digest 

Littell's living age 

London weekly Times 

Missionary review of the world 

Nation 

National geographic magazine 

Nineteenth century 

North American review 

Outing 

Outlook 

Popular mechanics 

Public libraries 

Readers' guide to periodical literature 

The Weekly review 

St. Nicholas 

School arts magazine 

Scientific American 

Scribner's magazine 

Survey 

Woman's Home Companion 

World's work 

Youth's companion 

Andover Townsman 

Boston Herald 

Boston Transcript 

Christian Science Monitor 

Lawrence Telegram 

New York Times 



131 



NEW BOOKS ADDED DURING 1920 



State and government documents are not listed. Duplicates, replacements 
and books for the Ballardvale Branch are also omitted. 

GENERAL REFERENCE BOOKS 

281 H27 Hastings, James ed. Dictionary of the Apostolic 

church. 2v. 
929 W81 *Johnson, E. F. Woburn records of births, marriages 

and deaths, 1699-1890. 
603 H62 Hiscox, G. D. ed. Henley's twentieth century formulas. 

929 M927 "Lowell, D. O. S. Munsey-Hopkins genealogy. 

051 S174i St. Nicholas index. 

PERIODICALS 

051 R32 American monthly review of reviews, v. 61. 

051 A881 Atlantic monthly, v. 123-125. 

052 B56 Blackwood's magazine, v. 205-207. 
051 B64 Bookman, v. 49, 50. 

051 C33 Century, v. 98, 99. 

051 F77 Forum, v. 61, 62. 

716 G16 Garden magazine, v. 29. 

051 H23 Harper's magazine, v. 139, 140. 

705 H81 House beautiful, v. 45-47. 

051 138 Independent, v. 99-101. 

705 161 International studio, v. 68-70. 

020.5 L61 Library journal, v. 44. 

051 L71 Littell's living age, v. 302-305. 

910.5 N21 National geographic magazine, v. 35-37. 

052 N62 Nineteenth century, v. 85-87. 

051 N81 North American review, v. 210, 211. 

051 094 Outlook, v. 122-124. 

621 P81 Popular mechanics, v. 32, 33. 

020.5 P96 Public libraries, v. 24. 

051 S147 St. Nicholas, v. 46, pt. 2, 47, pt. 1. 

370.5 S35 School arts magazine, v. 18, 19. 

605 S416 Scientific American, v. 121, 122. 

051 S434 Scribner's magazine, v. 66, 67. 

305 S96 Survey, v. 42. 

051 W89 World's work, v. 38, 39. 



'Gifts 



132 



ETHICAL AND RELIGIOUS BOOKS 

(Purchased chiefly from the Phillips Fund) 

220.9 B15 Bailey and Kent. History of the Hebrew commonwealth 

131 B34 Baylor, Courtenay. Remaking a man. 

150 B46 *Betts, G. H. The mind and its education. 

170 B81 Brown, C. R. Yale talks. 

266 C73 Committee on the war. Missionary outlook. 

220 C84 *Cragin, L. E. Kindergarten Bible stories. 

221 C81o *Cragin, L. E. Old Testament stories. 

133 C84 *Craig, K. T. Stars of destiny. 

134 D77n Doyle, Sir A. C. The new revelation. 
134 D77v Doyle, Sir A. C. The vital message. 
134 D81 Dresser, H. W. The open vision. 

268 E29 Eggleston, M. W. Use of the story in religious educa- 

tion. 
134 F84 *Frank, Henry. Psychic phenomena. 

260 J 13 . Jackson, H. E. A community church. 

134 K58 King, Basil. Abolishing of death. 

170 M12 McCall, A. B. The larger vision. 

237 M13 McComb, Samuel. Future life in the light of modern 

inquiry. 
209 M 78 Moore, G. F. History of religions. 2v. 

171 P18a Palmer, G. H. Altruism. 

220 P51 Phelps, W. L. Reading the Bible. 

244 S63h *Slattery, Margaret. Highway to leadership. 

266 S74g Speer, R. E. Gospel and the new world. 

150 W33 Watson, J. B. Psychology from the standpoint of a be- 

haviorist. 
268 W42 *Weigle, L. A Talks to Sunday-school teachers. 

GENERAL ECONOMICS 

332 A26 *Agger, E. A. Organized banking. 

304 B39 *Beer, G. L. English-speaking peoples. 

649 B73 Brainerd, A. M. Organization of public health nursing. 

330 C19 Carlton, F. T. Elementary economics. 

330 C73 *Coman, Katherine. Industrial history of the U. S. 

825 C77 *Coolidge, Calvin. Have faith in Massachusetts. 

331.8 D49 Devine, E. T. The family and social work. 

340 F55 *Fitch, A. N. New commercial law. 

330 F91 *Friedman, E. M. ed. American problems of recon- 
struction. 

352 G57 *Gilbert, A. B. American cities. 

396 G76 Grant, Robert. Law and the family. 

341.1 H19 Hansen, Harry. Adventures of the fourteen points. 

133 



332 H71 *Holdsworth, J. T. Money and banking. 

330 K52 Keynes, J. M. Economic consequences of the peace. 

331.8 L64 Link, H. C. Employment psychology. 

353.9 L98 *Lyman, G. H. Story of the Massachusetts committee 

on public safety. 

329 M25 *Macy, Jesse. Party organization and machinery. 
360 M31p Mangold, G. B. Problems of child welfare. 

341 M66 *Minor, R. C. Republic of nations. 

330 034 *Ogg, F. A. Economic development of modern Europe. 
354 034 *Ogg, F. A. Governments of Europe. 

329 085 *Ostrogovski, M. Democracy and the party system. 
353 P69 *Plass, A. A. Civics for Americans in the making. 
332 P88 *Pratt, S. S. Work of Wall street. 

330 R18 *Raper, C. L. Principles of wealth and welfare. 
328 R54r Roberts, H. M. Rules of order. 

332 S42 *Scott, W. A. Money and banking. 

331.8 S59 Simkhovitch, M. K. City worker's world. 

335 S62 *Skelton, O. K. Socialism. 

335 S73p Spargo, John. Psychology of Bolshevism. 

335 S14 *St. Leger, A. Australian socialism. 

330 T37 Thompson, C. M. Elementary economics 

367 W21s Ward, E. J. ed. Social centre. 

327 W76 Wister, Owen. A straight deal. 

825 W85 *Wood, Leonard. National issues. 



BOOKS ON EDUCATION 

173 C54 Clark, T. A. High school boy. 

796 C63 Coale, A. W. Summer in the girls' camp. 

379 C72 *Colvin, S. S. Introduction to High school teaching. 

370 C72 Colvin, S. S. The learning process. 

371.4 G87 Griffith, I. S. Teaching manual and industrial arts. 

371.3 K33 *Kendall and Mirick. How to teach the fundamental 

subjects. 

379 P22 *Parker, S. C. Methods of teaching in High schools. 

370 R76 Rousseau, J. J. Emile. 

174 W37 *Weaver, D. W. Medicine as a profession. 

371 W85 *Woodley, O. I. Profession of teaching. 



BOOKS ON SCIENCE 

598.2 C36w Chapman, F. M. What bird is that? 

530 H24 Harrow, Benjamin. From Newton to Einstein. 

570 H66 Hodge and Dawson. Civic biology. 

547 H72 *Holleman, A. F. Text -book of organic chemistry. 

134 



540 K12 *Kahlenberg and Hart. Chemistry and its relations to 

daily life. 

580 K24n Keeler, H. L. Our northern autumn. 

523 L58 Lewis, I. M. Splendors of the sky. 

540 M13 McCoy and Terry. Introduction to general chemistry. 

537.8 R43 *Rideal, E. K. Industrial electro-metallurgy. 

536 S53 *Shealy, E. M. Heat. 

540 S59 *Simon and Base. Manual of chemistry. 

660 S63 Slosson, E. E. Creative chemistry. 

530 S63 Slosson, E. E. Easy lessons in Einstein. 

547 S64 *Smith, Alexander. Introduction to inorganic chemistry. 

FARM AND HOME MANAGEMENT 

Bennett, I. D. Busy woman's garden book. 

Brown, N. C. Forest products. 

Cobb, Ernest. The hen at work. 

*Day, G. E. Productive swine husbandry. 

*Gilbert, A. W. The potato. 

*Henry and Morrison. Feeds and feeding. 

Kelly, J. E. The high road to health. 

*King, F. H. The soil. 

*Lloyd, J. W. Productive vegetable growing. 

*Lyon, T. L. Soils and fertilizers. 

*Montgomery, E. G. Productive farm crops. 

Schmidt, C. L. Garments for girls. 

*Sears, F. C. Productive orcharding. 

Sherlock, C. C. Care and management of rabbits. 

*Warren, G. F. Elements of agriculture. 

*Warren, G. F. Farm management. 

*Woll, F. W. Handbook for farmers and dairymen. 

BUSINESS HANDBOOKS 

Atwood, A. W. Putnam's investment handbook. 
*Barrett, H. J. How to sell more goods. 
*Bleyer, W. G. Newspaper writing and editing. 
*Calkins, E. E. Business of advertising. 
*Cherington, P. T. Advertising as a business force. 
Etheridge, Herbert. Dictionary of type-writing. 
*Harrington, H. F. Essentials in journalism. 
*Hatfield, H. R. Modern accounting. 
*Hess, H. W. Productive advertising. 
Hoerle and Saltzberg. The girl and the job. 
*Hollingworth, H. L. Advertising and selling. 
*Kilduff, E. J. The private secretary. 

135 



635 


B43 


674 


B81 


636 


.5 C63 


636.4 D33 


635 


G37 


636 


H39 


613 


.7 K29 


631 


K58s 


635 


L77 


631 


L98 


630 


M76 


646 


S34 


634 


S43 


636 


7 S55 


630 W25e 


630 W25f 


630 W83 


332 


6 A88 


659 


B27 


070 B61 


659 


C13 


659 


C42 


652 


E84 


071 


H23 


657 


H28 


659 


H46 


396 


H67 


659 


H72 


658 


K55 



659 M27 *Mahin, J. L. Advertising. 

653 M38 Mason, W. L. How to become an office stenographer. 

659 M45 *Maxwell, William. Salesmanship. 

657 M62 Miner, G. W. Book-keeping. 
659 N49 *Nystrom, P. H. Retail selling. 

658 T21 *Taylor, F. W. Principles of scientific management. 

MECHANICAL AND USEFUL ARTS 

677 B79 *Brooks, E. C. Story of cotton. 

678 C27 *Caspari, W. A. India-rubber laboratory practice. 
629.1 C31 *Cayard, L. H. Automobile tire handbook. 

677 C44 *Chittick, James. Silk manufacturing. 

629 . 1 F86 Fraser and Jones. Motor vehicles and their engines. 

621 H13 Hale, J. W. L. Practical mechanics. 

621 H25 *Hartman, W. B. Machine shop practice. 

621.1 H31 *Hawkins, N. Handbook of calculations for engineers. 

621.1 H32 Hawley, Thomas. American steam engines. 

621.1 H61 *Hirshfeld and Ulbricht. Steam power. 

629.1 H65 *Hobbs and Elliott. The gasoline automobile. 

621 . 1 J23 *James and Dole. Mechanism of steam engines. 

621 K16 *Kaup, W. J. Machine shop practice. 

621 . 1 L96 *Ludy, L. V. Locomotive boilers and engines. 2v. 

629.1 M31 Manly, H. P. Automobile ignition. 

621.4 M34 *Marks, L. S. Gas and oil engines. 

621 N79 *Norris and Craig. Advanced shop mathematics. 

629.1044 Oldfield, Barney. Book for the motorist. 

629.1 P14m *Page, V. W. Modern gasoline automobile. 

678 P82 *Porritt, B. D. Chemistry of rubber. 
621.4 R18 *Rathbun, J. B. Gas engine troubles. 

621 . 1 R68 * Roper, Stephen. Questions and answers for stationary 

and marine engineers. 

621.3 S47 Sengstock, F. F. Electrician's wiring manual. 

621 . 1 W33 *Watson, E. P. How to run engines and boilers. 

FINE ARTS ' 

745 B31 *Batchelder, E. A. Design in theory and practice. 

681 B74 *Brearley, H. C. Time telling through the ages. 

745 C38 *Chase, J. C. Decorative design. 

759.3 D56 *Dickinson, H. A. German masters of art. 

735 E14 *Eaton, D. C. Handbook of modern French sculpture. 

745 F88 *French and Meiklejohn. Essentials of lettering. 
929 . 6 H77 *Hope, W. H. Heraldry for craftsmen and designers. 
759.1 179 Isham, Samuel. History of American painting. 

746 K29 Kellogg, Charlotte. Bobbins of Belgium. 

136 



759.1 K58 
780.9 N19 
759.5 R35 
710 R67 
710 Til 
759.1 V28 
745 W85 



King, Pauline. American mural painting. 

Nathan, M. M. History of Russian music. 

*Ricci, Corrado. Art in northern Italy. 

*Root and Kelley. Design in landscape gardening. 

Tabor, Grace. Landscape gardening book. 

Van Dyke, J. C. American painting and its tradition. 

Woodhouse, Thomas. Textile design. 



821 


C42b 


821 


C76 


824 


C88d 


808 


C92 


822 


D83 


822 


G13b 


824 G31 


822 


G46 


824 


H89b 


822 


K38a 


827 


L46w 


821 


M37r 


824 


M45 


822 


.08 M45 


821 


M58m 


822 


058 


824 


P22 


824 S28 


822 


S53h 


822 


.08 S64 


824 


S93p 


824 T59 


824 


W244 


821 


.08 W73 



LITERATURE, ESSAYS AND POETRY 

*Chesterton, G. K. Ballad of the White Horse. 

Conkling, Hilda. Poems by a little girl. 

Crothers, S. M. Dame school of experience. 

Curl, M.J. Expository writing. 

Drinkwater, John. Abraham Lincoln, a play. 

Galsworthy, John. Plays. 

Gerould, K. F. Modes and morals. 

Glaspell, Susan. Plays. 

Huneker, James. Bedouins. 

Kennedy, C. R. Army with banners. 

Leacock, Stephen. Winsome Winnie. 

Masefield, John. Reynard the fox. 

Maynard, Theodore. Carven from the laurel tree. 

Mayorga, M. G. ed. Representative one-act plays by 

American authors. 
Middleton, George. Masks. 
O'Neill, E. G. Beyond the horizon. 
Park, J. E. Bad results of good habits. 
Scarborough, Dorothy. From a southern porch. 
Shaw, Bernard. Heartbreak House, etc. 
Smith, A. M. ed. Short plays by representative authors. 
Sturgis, Mrs. R. C. Personal prejudices. 
Tomlinson, H. M. Old junk. 
Warner, F. L. Endicott and I. 
Winterly, J. T. comp. Yanks, A. E. F. verse. 



with skis and rein- 



DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL 

917.44 B22 Bangs, M. R. Old Cape Cod. 

918.6 B87 *Bullard, Arthur. Panama. 

914.71 B97 *Butler, F. H. Through Lapland 

deer. 

917.44 C39 Chatham, Dennis. Cape Coddities. 

917.3 D35 *DeConstant, P. H. B. America and her problems. 

914.6 H83 *Howe, Maud. Sun and shadow in Spain. 

917.3 J63w Johnson, Clifton. What to see in America. 



137 



917.4 K65 
910 M61 

917.8 M62a 
917.1 N48 
919.6 013 
914 P38 
582 S59 

917.9 S63 
914.259 T37 
917.91 V28 



92 R764a 
92 152 
92 B264 
92 R674b 
92 D373 
92 A933f 
92 G413 
92 R764g 
92 L641 

92 W851 
92 H835h 

92 N161re 
92 W562 
92 W588 
92 Y89 



940.9 A82 
956 A83 
940.91 B28 

940.91 B29 
974.2 C74b 
974.4 H29c 
940.91 C97 
994 F86 
940.91 G12 
940.91 G355n 
991.4 K12 
956 K72 
973.2 L88 



Kittredge, G. L. Old farmer and his almanac. 
*Mill, R. H. ed. The international geography. 
Mills, E. A. Adventures of a nature guide. 
Newton, W. D. Westward with the Prince of Wales. 
O'Brien, Frederick. White shadows in the South seas. 
*Pennell, E. R. Nights. 

Simmons, J. R. Historic trees of Massachusetts. 
Sloane, J. M. The smiling hill-top. 
*Thompson, A. H. Cambridge and its colleges. 
Van Dyke, J. C. Grand canyon of the Colorado. 

BIOGRAPHY 

Abbott, L. F. Impressions of Theodore Roosevelt. 

*Balfour, Frances. Dr. Elsie Inglis. 

Barnett, H. O. R. Canon Barnett. 2v. 

Bishop, J. B. Theodore Roosevelt and his time. 2 v. 

*Cook. Sir Edward. Delane of the Times. 

Firkins, O. W. Jane Austen. 

*Gillespie, Mrs. E. D. Book of remembrance. 

Graham, H. G. Rousseau. 

*Holland and Rockstro. Memoir of Mme. Jenny Lind — 

Goldschmidt. 2v. 
*Holme, J. G. Life of Leonard Wood. 
*Howe, Maud. The eleventh hour in the life of Julia 

Ward Howe. 
*Rose, J. H. Life of Napoleon I. 
Wheeler, Candace. Yesterdays in a busy life. 
Whiteley, Opal. Story of Opal. 
*Younghusband, Sir George. A soldier's memories. 

HISTORY 

* Ashley, R. L. Modern European civilization. 

Asian, Kevork. Armenia and the Armenians. 

Barton, George. Celebrated spies and mysteries of the 

Great War. 
Bassett, J. S. Our war with Germany. 
*Bouton, Nathaniel. History of Concord, N. H. 
*Chase, G. W. History of Haverhill, Mass. 
*Cutler, F. M. The 55th artillery, A. E. F. 
Fraser, J. F. Australia. 
*Gaines, Ruth. A village in Picardy. 
Gibbs, Philip. Now it can be told. 
*Kalaw, M. M. Self-government in the Philippines. 
Knapp, G. H. Tragedy of Bitlis. 
Lord, Arthur. Plymouth and the Pilgrims. 



138 



267.3 M45 *Mayo, Katherine. "That damm Y." 

953 P83 *Porter, R. P. Japan. 

940.91 R676 Roosevelt, Theodore. Average Americans. 

940.91 S61 Sims, W. S. The victory at sea. 

940.91 S62 *Sirois, E. D. Fighting Battery C, 102nd F. A. 

940.91 U85S Usher, R. G. Story of the Great War. 

920 W32 Watkins, J. E. Famous mysteries. 

FICTION 

Arnold, E. L. Wonderful adventures of Phra the Phoenician. 

Bacheller, Irving. Man for the ages. 

Barbusse, Henri. *We others. 

Bassett, S. W. The harbor road. 

Bassett, S. W. The wall between. 

Bindloss, Harold. Partners of the out-trail. 

Black, Alexander. The great desire. 

Bojer, Johan. *Power of a lie. 

Brown, E. A. That affair at St. Peter's. 

Buck, C. N. *Pagan of the hills. 

Burt, K. N. The red lady. 

Carlsen, C. L. Son of Pio. 

Cummins, G. D. The land they loved. 

Cutting, M. S. Some of us are married. 

Darrow, Clarence. Farmington. 

Day, Holman. All-wool Morrison. 

Dillon, Mary. Farmer of Roaring Run. 

Dingle, A. E. Gold out of Celebes. 

Ervine, St. J. G. Foolish lovers. 

Evarts, H. G. The cross pull. 

Ferber, Edna. Half portions. 

Fitzgerald, F. S. K. This side of Paradise. 

Fletcher, J. S. The Paradise mystery. 

Fletcher, J. S. The Talleyrand maxim. 

Foote, M. H. The ground swell. 

Footner, Hulbert. The fur bringers. 

Foster, John. The searchers. 

French, J. L. ed. Best psychic stories. 

Gale, Zona. Miss Lulu Bett. 

Gerould, G. H. Youth in Harley. 

Graham, Alan. Follow the little pictures. 

Graham, J. C. It happened at Andover. 

Grey, Zane. Man of the forest. 

Hall, E. B. Love laughs last. 

Hannay, J. O. Up, the rebels! 

Hawkins, A. H. Secret of the tower. 

139 



Howells, W. D. ed. Great American short stories. 

Ibanez, V. B. Mare nostrum. 

In the mountains. 

Kelley, E. M. Outside Inn. 

Kerr, Sophie. Painted meadows. 

Knibbs, H. H. Ridin' kid from Powder river. 

Kyne, P. B. Green pea pirates. 

Lewis, Sinclair. Main street. 

Lincoln, J. C. The Portygee. 

Locke, W. J. House of Baltazar. 

Lynde, Francis. The wreckers. 

MacGrath, Harold. Man with three names. 

MacKenzie, Compton. Poor relations. 

McSpadden, J. W. ed. Famous detective stories. 

Marshall, Archibald. Many Junes. 

Marshall, Archibald. Sir Harry. 

Mason, C. A. Conscripts of conscience. 

Merrick, Leonard. Conrad in quest of his youth. 

Montgomery, L. M. Further chronicles of Avonlea. 

Morris, E. B. The cresting wave. 

Mulder, Arnold. The outbound road. 

Myers, A. B. Patchwork. 

Norris, Kathleen. Harriet and the piper. 

Norton, Roy. Drowned gold. 

Oemler, M. C *The purple heights. 

Olmstead, Florence. Stafford's island. 

Onions, Mrs. Oliver. The disturbing charm. 

Onions, Mrs. Oliver. Sweethearts unmet. 

Oppenheim, E. P. The great impersonation. 

Ovington, M. W. The shadow. 

Porter, R. N. Girl from Four Corners. 

Price, E. B. Silver Shoal light. 

The rain girl. 

Reeve, A. B. ed. Best ghost stories. 

Sampson, E. S. Mammy's white folks. 

Sawyer, Ruth. Leerie. 

Sedgwick, A. D. The third window. 

Shafer, D. C. Barent Creighton. 

Singmaster, Elsie. Basil Everman. 

Sullivan, Alan. The rapids. 

Swinnerton, Frank. September. 

Taylor, K. H. Barbara of Baltimore. 

Vachell, H. A. Whitewash. 

Vallotton, Benjamin. *Potterat and the war. 

Vorse, M. H. Growing up. 



140 



Walpole, Hugh. Jeremy. 

Ward, Florence. The singing heart. 

Ward, Mrs. M. A. A. Helena. 

Wells, Carolyn. Raspberry jam. 

White, S.E. The killer. 

Widdemer, Margaret. The boardwalk. 

Williamson, C. N. and A. M. The lion's mouse. 

Williamson. C. N. and A. M. The second latchkey. 

Willsie, Honore. The forbidden trail. 

CHILDREN'S BOOKS— NON-FICTION 

821.08 B17 Baker, E. K. comp. Children's book of poetry, 3v. 

353 F86 Fraser, C. C. Young citizen's own book. 

796 G44 Girl scouts. Scouting for girls. 

694 G57 Goldsmith, Milton. Practical things with simple tools. 

909 G65 Gordy, W. F. American beginnings in Europe. 

940.91 G65 Gordy, W. F. Causes and meanings of the Great 
War. 

914.1 H91 Hunter, G. M. When I was a boy in Scotland. 
361 H99 Hyde, M. K. Girls' book of the Red Cross. 

973 . 2 M42 Mathews, Basil. Argonauts of faith. 
914.5 M47 Meiklejohn, N. L. Cart of many colors. 

793 P29c Payne, F. U. Plays and pageants of citizenship. 

92 A668 r Richards, L. E. Joan of Arc. 

920 R79 Rowell, C. W. H. Leaders of the Great War. 

511 S64 Smith, D. E. Number stories of long ago. 

641 W29 Waterman, A. H. L. Little preserving book for a little 

girl. 

940.91 W56 Wheeler, F. R. Boys' book of the world war. 

793 W63 Wickes, F. G. Child's book of holiday plays. 

970.1 W69 Wilson, E. N. The white Indian boy. 

STORIES FOR CHILDREN 

Baker, Olaf . Shasta of the wolves. 

Barbour and Holt. Mystery of the Sea-lark. 

Burton, C. P. The trail makers. 

Heyliger, William. High Benton. 

Ingersoll, Ernest. Raisin creek exploring club. 

Knipe, E. B. and A. A. A Mayflower maid. 

Lindsay, Maud. Bobby and the big road. 

McNeil, Everett. Buried treasure. 

Meigs, Cornelia. Pool of stars. 

Perkins, L. F. Italian twins. • 

141 



Phillips, E. C. Little friend Lydia. 
Quirk, L. W. Boy scouts of Lakeville High. 
Richards, L. E. Honor Bright. 
Scoville, Samuel. Blue pearl. 
Seaman, A. H. Crimson patch. 
Singmaster, Elsie. John Baring's house. 
Spyri, Johanna. Cornelli. 
Taggart, M. A. Pilgrim maid. 
Turpin, Edna. Treasure mountain. 
White, E. O. The strange year. 



REPORT OF CUSTODIAN 
JOHN CORNELL ART GALLERY 



To the Trustees of the Memorial Hall Library. 

Gentlemen: I herewith submit the report of the gallery for 
the twelve months ending December 31, 1920. 

The attendance for the past year has necessarily been small, 
the high price of coal having a blighting effect upon the ability of 
the gallery to present an open door and a comfortable welcome 
during the winter months. A regrettable, but unavoidable 
situation. 

The gallery was opened the first of May and closed the first of 
November. 182 visitors were registered. Of this number, 63 
were adults and 119 children. 

The ending of the year of 1920 rounds out twenty years of ser- 
vice which the gallery has rendered to the townspeople. Though 
inaccessible to those who, through age or other limitations, can- 
not climb so high, it surely has been a source of inspiration and 
help to many. Much has been done ; more could be accomplished. 
Here is a collection of high-grade photographs, presenting a 
wealth of beauty and knowledge. If parents and teachers would 
co-operate by endeavoring to arouse an added interest in the 
children in the attractions of the gallery, occasionally coming in 
with them, the result would be beneficial to all. The older schol- 
ars should have a certain familiarity with Raphael's wonderful 
frescoes in the Vatican, his Loggia, and Michael Angelo's mighty 
work in the Sistine Chapel. They should know about Raphael's 
cartoons, one of the treasures of the South Kensington Museum 
in London. All this, and more, could they learn by repeated 
visits to the gallery. 

143 



Of course, there are many children to whom such subjects would 
not appeal, but there are also others who would only need start- 
ing in that direction. Once their interest was aroused, they would 
keep on in the quest for more light. 

The attention of the public has been called before to the col- 
lection of photographs so generously donated by Mr. Addison B. 
LeBoutillier. Some of these would play an important part in 
the suggestions which have been presented. The gallery has been 
a decided asset to the town. It should be even more so in the 
coming years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ABBIE S. DAVIS 

Custodian 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



TWENTY- FIRST ANNUAL 
REPORT 



OF THE 



Board of Public Works 



EMBRACING THE THIRTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF 
WATER COMMISSIONERS AND TWENTY- 
FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF 
SEWER COMMISSIONERS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1920 



ANDOVER, MASS. 

THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1921 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

1889—1899 

*JOHN H. FLINT *JAMES P. BUTTERFIELD 

*FELIX G. HAYNES 



SEWER COMMISSIONERS 
1893—1894 1894—1899 



*WM. S. JENKINS 
*JOHN L. SMITH 
CHARLES E. ABBOTT 



*WM. S. JENKINS 
*JOHN L. SMITH 
*JOHN E. SMITH 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



1899—1902 

*JOHN H. FLINT 
*WM. S. JENKINS 
*JOHN L. SMITH 
*JAMES P. BUTTERFIELD 
*FELIX G. HAYNES 

1906—1907 

*FELIX G. HAYNES 
*JOHN W. BELL, Treas. 
JAMES C. SAWYER, Sec'y 
*LEWIS T. HARDY 
*HARRY M. EAMES 

1908—1912 

*LEWIS T. HARDY 
*JOHN W. BELL, Treas. 
JAMES C. SAWYER, Sec'y 
ANDREW McTERNEN 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS 

1914—1916 

THOS. E. RHODES ('19) 
BARNETT ROGERS ('16) 
*LEWIS T.. HARDY ('16) 
ANDREW McTERNEN, Sec'y ('18) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas. ('18) 

1917—1918 

BARNETT ROGERS ('19) 
THOS. E. RHODES ('20) 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('18) 
CHAS. B. BALDWIN, .Sec'y ('19) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas. ('18) 

1919—1920 

BARNETT ROGERS ('22) ARTHUR T. BOUTWELL ('22) 

WILLIAM D. McINTYRE ('21) PHILIP L. HARDY Sec'y ('21) 

THOS. E. RHODES, Treas. ('23) 

SUPERINTENDENT 

FRANK L. COLE 
* Deceased. 



1903—1906 

*JOHN L. SMITH 
*FELIX G. HAYNES 
*JOHN W. BELL 
*LEWIS T. HARDY 
JAMES C. SAWYER 

1907—1908 

*FELIX G. HAYNES 
*JOHN W. BELL, Treas. 
JAMES C. SAWYER, Sec'y 
*LEWIS T. HARDY 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

1913—1914 

*LEWIS T. HARDY ('16) 
BARNETT ROGERS ('16) 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('15) 
THOS. E. RHODES, Sec'y ('14) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas. (15) 

1916—1917 

BARNETT ROGERS ('19) 
THOS. E. RHODES ('17) 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('18) 
CHAS. B. BALDWIN, Sec'y ('19) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS,Treas.('18) 

1918—1919 

BARNETT ROGERS ('22) 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('21) 
PHILIP L. HARDY ('21) 
CHAS. B. BALDWIN, Sec'y ('22) 
THOS. E. RHODES, Treas. ('20) 



REPORT OF 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



To the Citizens of the Town of Andover, Mass. 

Your Board of Public Works herewith submits its annual re- 
port for the year ending December 31, 1920. 

This is the eighth annual report of the Board under the re- 
organization and includes the thirty-second annual report of the 
water system, the twenty-fourth of the sewer system and the 
eighth of the Highway and Park Departments since they have 
been under the control of the Board of Public Works. 

Organization 

Mr. Arthur Boutwell and Mr. William Mclntyre were elected 
to the Board by vote of the Town, the former for two years to 
fill out the unexpired term of Mr. Charles Baldwin, resigned, and 
the latter for one year to fill out the unexpired term of Mr. An- 
drew McTernen, resigned. 

The Board met on March 3, 1920 and organized as follows: 

Chairman, Barnett Rogers. 
Secretary, Philip L. Hardy. 
Treasurer, Thomas E. Rhodes. 

Mr. Frank L. Cole was appointed Superintendent of the 
Board of Public Works for one year at a salary of $3000,00 a 
year and Mr. George Dick was appointed as Assistant Superin- 
tendent at a salary of $30 . 00 a week. 

5 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

During the past year no extensions have been made to the water 
system with the exception of extensions made in Shawsheen Vil- 
lage which have been paid for by the owners. 

The appropriation of $17,000.00 for maintaining the present 
system was overdrawn $2,924.11, which is accounted for by the 
fact that we pumped 27,000,000 gallons of water to Lawrence for 
which the town received $5,000.00, which if placed to the credit 
of the water department would show that we kept well within our 
appropriation. 

The appropriation of $2000.00 for construction was spent on 
installation of new service-pipes, meters, and expenses attached 
to them. 

The Board recommends the sum of $18,000.00 for maintenance 
and $2,000.00 for construction for the use of this department for 
the ensuing year. 

The "Water Bonded Debt 

The Bonded Debt of the Water system January 1, 1920, was 
$123,000.00. During the year 1920 there has been paid out, out of 
the Town Treasury, $8,000.00; leaving a bonded debt on this sys- 
tem January 1, 1921, of $115,000.00. 

Of this indebtedness $40,000.00 is redeemable by the Sinking 
Fund, which on January 1, 1921, amounted to $33,026.14. 

The sum of $750.00 should be appropriated for the Sinking 
Fund for the year 1921. 

THE SEWER DEPARTMENT 

At a special Town Meeting held last year the Town voted to 
issue "bonds to pay for the cost of extending the main sewer from 
Stimpson's Bridge to a new pumping station to be located in 
Shawsheen Village and to reimburse, the American Woolen 
Company for the difference in cost between an eight-inch and a 
twelve-inch force main from the new station to the filter-beds, as 
was advocated by the Board of Public Works. 

The Board advertised for bids for this work and at a meeting 
held September 20, 1920, Cendella and Company of Milford, 



Mass., were awarded the contract for laying a main sewer from 
Stimpson's Bridge to a new pumping plant at Shawsheen Village, 
for the sum of $14,700.00 with a provision of $8.00 per cubic yard 
for ledgework. 

This work was started as soon as the pipe could be procured 
and has been finished during 1920. The pipe for the work was 
furnished by the Town and a detailed statement of the expendi- 
tures is included in the report of the Superintendent. 

There were no other extensions made to the sewerage system 
during the past year. A statement of the upkeep and mainten- 
ance of the present system in detail, is included in the Superin- 
tendent's report. 

The State Department of Public Health has advised this 
Board that it will be absolutely necessary to enlarge the filtration 
beds this coming year. To accomplish this enlargement the 
Board asks and recommends an appropriation of $15,000.00 to 
pay for the cost of doing such part of this work as it seems advis- 
able should be done this year. 

The sum of $3,000.00 is recommended for maintenance of the 
Sewer Department for the ensuing year. 

The Sewer Bonded Debt 

The bonded debt of the Sewer System January 1, 1920, was 
$85,000.00. During the year 1920, $5,000.00 was paid from the 
town treasury on this indebtedness. As was voted by the town, 
bonds were issued for $40,000.00 to extend the Sewer to Shaw- 
sheen Village and pay part of the cost of the new force main, thus 
making the total indebtedness on January 1, 1921, $120,000.00. 

Of this amount $30,000.00 is redeemable by the Sinking Fund 
which on January 1, 1921 amounted to $19,170.35. 

The sum of $1,000.00 should be appropriated for the Sinking 
Fund for the year 1921. 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

The Board has maintained its policy of placing cinders on 
roads in the outlying districts as far as possible with the material 
and money available. 



There have been no new tarvia roads built during 1920 with the 
exception of Lowell Street and Wolcott Avenue, which were pro- 
vided for by special appropriations. 

The tarvia roads already built and which required blanketing 
were, as is customary, given a coat of tar and sand to maintain 
them in as good condition as possible. 

In order to keep heavy traffic off School, Central and Bartlet 
Streets, and to prevent excessive wear, the Board of Public 
Works petitioned the selectmen to close these streets to heavy 
traffic, which they very kindly did. 

The Town was very fortunate in having the Public Works De- 
partment of the State rebuild that part of Main Street between 
Porter Road and Chapel Avenue and save a very heavy expense to 
them. Also the State Highway has been extended approximately 
800 feet nearer the center of the town. The permanent job done 
on the hill was accomplished at an expense to the town of ap- 
proximately $10,000.00, which is only a small fraction of the cost 
of the entire work. The Board hopes in the near future to show 
its appreciation of the co-operation of the State by extending this 
fine type of permanent road to the square. 

It was found necessary to purchase a new steam roller for the 
use of this department, which necessitated an expenditure of 
$5500.00. The old roller had served the town for eighteen years 
and was sold for $1,000.00. 

A detailed statement of the expenditures of the appropriations 
for highways is given in the report of the Superintendent. 

The Board asks and recommends the appropriation of $30,000 
for new construction and $30,000.00 for maintenance for the 
ensuing year. 

Snow Removal 

An expenditure of $10,800.00 was necessary to take care of re- 
moving snow during 1920, which cut down materially the appro- 
priation for Highway maintenance, as the Board had included in 
its budget only $1500.00 to do this work. 

We have included under the maintenance appropriation recom- 
mended above, the sum of $2000.00 to care for the cost of remov- 
ing snow the ensuing year. 

8 



Sidewalks 

The Board has been able to do very little in the way of building 
new sidewalks during the past year, owing to the heavy expendi- 
tures necessary in the other work of the department. 

Lowell Street 

There have been 6575 feet of road built on Lowell Street the 
past year at an expense of $37,500.00. One third of this expense 
was borne by the Town, $5,000.00 of this portion was taken care 
of by special appropriations and the balance taken out of the con- 
struction appropriation of the Highway Department. 

There remains about seven-eighths of a mile of road to build 
to complete Lowell Street to the Tewksbury line and the Board 
has inserted an article in the warrant asking for an appropriation 
of $5,000.00 as the town's share of the expense to complete the 
work in the ensuing year. 

At the last annual town meeting the Board was instructed to 
make an investigation of the water department and to make such 
recommendations as they thought advisable at the next town 
meeting. With the idea in mind of obtaining all the information 
possible, the Board invited a committee consisting of Mr. E. V. 
French, Mr. Fred Wallace, and Mr. Chester Holland to assist 
them in this investigation and to make a report to the Board 
making such recommendations as they saw fit. 

This committee has made a report to the Board making certain 
recommendations which this Board highly endorses and hopes 
the town will see fit to adopt. 

The Board appreciates the work done by these gentlemen in 
investigating this department and wishes to take this opportunity 
to thank them for their co-operation. 

BARNETT ROGERS 
THOMAS E. RHODES 
WILLIAM D. McINTYRE 
ARTHUR T. BOUTWELL 
PHILIP L. HARDY 

Board of Public Works 



ANDOVER WATER WORKS 

At the Annual Town Meeting, March 1, 1920, after discussing 
a proposition to increase the water rates, an amendment to a 
motion was adopted reading as follows : 

That the Board of Public Works be instructed to 
investigate the whole status of the Water Depart- 
ment covering the question of rates, the charges for 
fire services and other public services, and the ad- 
visability of having the Water Department operated 
as a self-supporting department and to report its 
conclusions and recommendations at the next Annual 
town meeting or at a special town meeting. 
The Board of Public Works asked Messrs. E. V. French, C. W. 
Holland and F. A. Wallace to report to it on this matter with 
advice as to the course recommended, and we have given the 
problem careful study. 

The Town of Andover now appropriates yearly the money 
necessary for the maintenance of the Water Works, for new con- 
struction, for the interest on the water bonds, and for the sinking 
fund and serial bond requirements. In return the Town takes the 
income from water rates. 

It is now generally agreed that a public water system should 
be operated as a separate business, with its own accounts inde- 
pendent from the other finances of the town. It may, however, be 
carried on as a division of another department so as not to dupli- 
cate machinery, and in Andover it would be best for it to continue 
under the Board of Public Works. In many New England cities 
and towns the water works are operated as a separate business 
in this way. 

The principal argument for this method is that the supplying 
of water is a public service different from practically all other 
services rendered by a town, in that a revenue is received and it 
seems the soundest business policy to make the service pay its 
own way. There appears no good reason why water users should 
get water cheaper than its cost with the deficit made up by con- 
tribution from the general tax levy or that they should pay more 

10 



than the cost and return a profit to the general treasury. Opera- 
tion as a separate business encourages efficiency and shows quick- 
ly whether the water works are being operated at a profit or a loss. 
The year 1921 promises to be a normal one for the water de- 
partment and it is probable that for some years to come the con- 
ditions will not vary greatly. The estimated Income and Expen- 
ditures for the Andover Water Works for 1921 are as follows: 



Income 



Expenditures 



From sale of water to Andover users $26,500 
From other sources — net 



Total 

For pumping, Care of Ponds, Reser- 
voirs, Mains, Services and Hydrants, 
Repairs, Reading Meters, Office Ex- 



$26,500 



penses and all sundries 




$18,000 


New Construction 




2,000 


Total for Operation 


$20,000 


Serial Bonds maturing 


$8,000 




Serial Bond coupons 


2,677 




Sinking Fund requirements 


750 




Sinking fund coupons 


1,600 





$13,027 



13,027 



Total Expenditures 
Total Income from above 

Difference or deficit 



$33,027 
26,500 

$ 6,527 



This difference must now be made up from the general tax 
levy. With the growth of Shawsheen Village there will probably 
be some increase in consumption and consequently a gain in 
revenue and a small corresponding increase in expenditures. 

11 



There will, however, be an appreciable reduction year by year in 
the cost of the bonded debt as follows : 



1921 


$13,027 


1931 


$5,647 


1922 


10,563 


1932 


4,463 


1923 


9,937 


1933 


3,335 


1924 


8,763 


1934 


1,261 


1925 


7,257 


1935 


1,220 


1926 


6,772 


1936 


1,180 


1927 


6,588 


1937 


1,140 


1928 


6,302 


1938 


1,100 


1929 


6,018 


1939 


1,060 


1930 


5,833 


1940 


1,020 



The above figures show that a few years hence the water works 
will become self-supporting unless considerable additional ex- 
penditures have to be made. 

There are, however, some additional sources of revenue, which 
the water department, if on a true business basis, ought to have. 
It is a fact that a considerable percentage of the original cost of 
the average water works plant is due to the fact that the system 
was made of a good deal larger capacity than necessary to furnish 
water for domestic and manufacturing purposes in order that it 
may be able to supply water for extinguishing fires. 

Two ordinary 1 1-8 in. fire streams, throwing 250 gallons per 
minute each, would discharge 720,000 gallons in twenty-four 
hours. The average daily consumption in Andover is about 
600,000 gallons. Two streams would give but scant protection 
for the business center of the town or for any large single building. 
Therefore, the rate of use of water for fire fighting is several times 
greater than that for all other purposes and must be supplied in 
addition to these normal uses. 

This requires larger mains and reservoirs and in some cases 
larger pumping capacity and consequently increases the cost of 
the works appreciably. This extra cost of the water works is 
purely a fire cost and the fixed charges due to it should properly 
be paid for in the same way that the fire department is sustained, 
that is, from the general tax levy. The amount of water which 
any consumer uses normally is not necessarily a measure of his 

12 



proper contribution for fire protection. Taxable value, though not 
a perfect guide, is more nearly a true measure. It would, there- 
fore, be a simple way of handling the situation to assume that the 
difference between Income and Expenditures should be considered 
as payment for fire services rendered by the water works. 

This charge would decrease as the requirements for the bonded 
debt decrease and it could later be determined whether it was 
better to continue a reasonable appropriation for this purpose 
and reduce the water rates or keep up the water rates and let this 
appropriation disappear largely. This charge would be con- 
siderably more than the $6,500 required today and can be com- 
puted more closely later if desired. 

The Town now pays the ordinary rates for water used in the 
schools and engine houses but does not pay for the water used in 
the public drinking fountains and for some few other public pur- 
poses. The water department should, however, receive a proper 
payment for all water supplied. 

In the matter of depreciation it is probably fair to assume that 
the past generation has built and paid for the present water 
works plant and that they will turn over to the next generation 
much valuable equipment still good for many years. Therefore, 
the next generation may properly pay in its turn for renewals 
and extensions by a further issue of bonds. With the present 
light we think that this is a fair arrangement. 

The practical working out of this would mean that all ordinary 
repairs and moderate renewals would be paid out of income. If, 
however, a considerable outlay became necessary, such as new 
pumping equipment or a large new supply main, it would be 
covered by issuing bonds. 

It will be of interest for a moment to look at the problem from 
another angle, namely to take the cost of the works to date, less 
depreciation, and then assume that as a going business it ought t 
after paying all expenses, to yield a fair return on its cost and put 
aside a proper amount yearly for a sinking fund to renew the plant 
as it wears out. 

The Water Department records show the actual cost to date 
to be $388,700. Equipment discarded may be estimated roughly 

13 



at $10,700, leaving the cost of the works now in use as $378,000. 
It would probably be fair to assume that the plant as a whole had 
depreciated 30% to date. This would leave the value of the works 
today on the basis of original cost 70% of $378,000 or $265,000. 

A return of 6% would seem fair. An annual depreciation of 
about 2% might be reasonable and may be used in this computa- 
tion. If a private business, taxes would be paid, say 2%. We 
would then have figures as follows : 

Cost of operation as above $20,000 

Interest 6% on $265,000 15,900 

Depreciation 2% 265,000 5,300 

Taxes 2% on 265,000 5,300 



Total $46,500 

Total income with present rates 26,500 



Deficit $20,000 

A fair charge for fire service would pay over half of this de- 
ficit. A charge for unpaid water now used would reduce it fur- 
ther. The remainder is very likely due in large measure to the 
liberal extensions of mains into thinly settled districts where the 
returns for water sold are small. A private water company could 
not have afforded the considerable expenditures which these ex- 
tensions cost. It would, of course, cost a good deal more to re- 
place the plant today than $378,000, the original cost of the works 
now in use, but for this general view no consideration need be 
given to this fact. 

Under all the conditions we believe as a practical matter the first 
method of consideration is the best one and recommend as follows : 

1. That the water works of Andover be operated as a separate 
business but under the Board of Public Works as at present. 

2. That the present water rates should not be raised as a whole. 
It is possible that some simplifying of the present sliding 
scales can be made to advantage. 

3. That the Water Department make yearly a statement of the 
difference between the estimated expenditures and receipts 

14 



for the coming year and that the Town appropriate an amount 
to cover this which may be considered as payment for the 
fire service which the water works stand ready to furnish at 
all times. 

4. That a proper amount be collected for all water used for 
drinking fountains and any other public purposes for which 
the water department now receives no income. 

5. That moderate repairs and extensions be made from normal 
income but that any large requirements for these purposes 
be paid for by issuing bonds. 

It now seems probable that there will be no requirement for any 
large expenditures for new work for several years to come. It 
can be determined best later whether it is better to let the charge 
for fire service disappear as the requirements for outstanding 
bonds decrease or to continue a considerable appropriation for 
this purpose and readjust rates. It is entirely possible that be- 
fore this becomes a live question some further needs will require 
an issue of bonds, thus making new fixed annual charges and pre- 
venting any large reductions in income required. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. V. FRENCH 
C. W. HOLLAND 

F. A. WALLACE 



15 



REDEMPTION OF BONDS 



Dr. 

No. 2 due 

No. 3 " 
No. 4 " 

No. 5 " 



To redeem Water Loan 



Balance January 1, 1920 
Appropriation March 1, 1920 
Interest on deposit 



Balance Sinking Fund Jan. 1, 1921 

Cr. 
Water Loan Funds deposited : 
Andover Savings Bank 
Andover National Bank 

Dr. 
To redeem Sewer Loans due 1928 
Balance Jan. 11, 1920 
Appropriation March 1920 
Assessments 
Interest on deposits 

Balance Sinking Fund Jan. 1, 1921 

Cr. 
Sewer Loan Deposits: 
Andover National Bank 



1922 
1923 
1925 
1928 

$30898.53 

750.00 

1377.61 



$10000.00 

10000.00 

15000.00 

5000.00 



$33026.14 






$33026.14 


$10029.80 


• 


22996.34 






^33076 \A. 




<4>OOUZU . JL't 




$30000.00 


$17007.12 




1000.00 




442.45 




720.78 





$19170.35 



$19170.35 



Examined, J. S. Robertson 
W. H. Coleman 



B. ROGERS 
THOMAS E. RHODES 
ARTHUR T. BOUTWELL 
WILLIAM D. McINTYRE 
PHILIP L. HARDY 

A uditors 



16 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



To the Board of Public Works. 

Gentlemen: — ■ In accordance with the usual custom I 
herewith submit the Thirty-Second report of the Water System, 
Twenty-fourth of the Sewer System, and the Eighth of the High- 
ways and Parks, containing a brief summary of the work per- 
formed by the different Departments, for the year ending Dec. 
31, 1920, with recommendations for 1921. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

There were no new mains laid during 1920 on the Town Streets. 
There were some laid on private property and paid for by owner. 
This was all 6" C. I. Pipe. Very little has been done on our 
Main Lines, only repairs, such as leaks, many joints have been 
blown, these being repaired as soon as discovered. During the 
year, or since our estimates were given to the Finance Committee, 
Wages, Coal, Oil and in fact most everything has advanced. We 
were obliged to help Lawrence out last February and March, for 
two months where we only expected to pump 3 or 4 weeks. There- 
fore our Maintenance of the Water Department was overdrawn 
somewhat. Our steam plant at Haggetts Pond was operated 
during 1920, 365 days, and has given good results as the following 
tables will show. 

Days Hours Gals, pumped Coal used Oil used Average d'ly 

365 3713.15 254,727,887 374 Tons 166 697,884 gals. 

While this is an average of 100,000 gals, more per day than in 
1919, during the months of February and March 1920 we pumped 
to Lawrence 27,216,675 gals, for which we received $5,093.20 or 
$186.66 per million from the City of Lawrence, leaving only about 
9 millions for our own use more than 1919, while our water 
receipts for 1920 were $2,458.69 more than 1919 after deducting 
Lawrence's $5,093.20. 

Receipts for water, 1919, $23,864.58, Gals, pumped 218,279,797 
" " 1920, 31,416.47, " " 254,727,887 

17 



No. 2 Station on Bancroft Road has been run practically the 
whole year on Electricity giving excellent results. This station is 
only used about 30 hours per week. 



would recommend for maintenance 1921: 




Salaries and Labor 


$11,000.00 


Coal, 350 Tons 


3,500.00 


Hard Coal 


100.00 


Fuel Oil, 3000 gals. 


600.00 


Eng. and Cylinder Oil 


700.00 


Power No. 2 Station 


1,000.00 


Keeping Horse and Car 


600.00 


Miscellaneous 


500.00 




$18,000.00 



Changing over Water Main on Haverhill Street, Shawsheen 
Village, Service Pipes and Hydrants, $1500.00. 

Permission to use the last Bond issue should be asked for the 
necessary funds for this work at the regular Town Meeting. 

Service Pipe 
There have been 65 applications received and 73 laid, which 
now makes 1594 actually in use, or a total of 126,443 feet in 
length. There were 8 more laid than applications called for, be- 
cause these were left over from 1919. 

Meters 
During 1920 there were set 90 meters varying from 5-8-2" in size. 
I would recommend for Service Pipe and Meters in 1921 the 
same as 1920, $2,000.00. 

Receipts 
Service Pipes and Meters $ 7,895.09 

Water rates 31,415.47 



$39,310.56 



Credits paid Treasurer 

Water rates $31,415.47 

Pipe Account 7,895.09 



$39,310.56 $39,310.56 

18 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 

During the year a Main Sewer has been laid from the present 
house at Shawsheen River, a distance of 3454 feet to a new pump 
house in Shawsheen Village, at a cost of $45,651.11. This cost 
included the main line above, difference between 8" and 12", 
which was laid from the new pump house to our settling tank at 
filter beds. The cost and itemized accounts will be given in the 
Expenditure Table to follow. This was done on a $40,000.00 
bond issue, and there is a balance of $81.00. 

Received from American Woolen Co. $ 5,508.86 
Received from Cendella and Co. 223.25 

Received from Bond issue 40,000.00 

Expenditures $45,651 . 11 

Balance 81.00 



$45,732.11 $45,732.11 
I recommend for Sewer Maintenance 1921, $3,000.00. 

House Connections 

There were received 16 applications for House Connections and 
of these only 14 were laid, making 756 in actual use. All connec- 
tions in Shawsheen Village have been laid by private owners, 
and up to this time are not a part of our system. 

Filter Beds 

There still remain 5 beds partly finished and pipe for a main 
line to feed them. According to letters on file from State Board of 
Health, we will have to build about 4 more as well as finish all 
work started during 1921. 

This will require $15,000.00 



19 



SUMMARY COST OF CONSTRUCTION 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



Designation 


Summary 

Approved 

Bills 


Credits 


(Net Cost 
for 
1920 


Total Cost 

for 
Construction 


Office Fixtures .... 

Telemeters 

Telephones 

Teams 

Pipe Distribution 

Service Pipe 

Water and Land .... 

Suction Pipe 

Reservoirs 

Coal Shed 

Grading Land .... 

Workshop 

Buildings Pumping Station 
Pumping Plants .... 
Construction Expenses 

Tools 

Maintenance 


8446.82 
21393.36 


6425.84 
1469.25 


2020.98 
19924.11 


$ 561.75 

1311.63 

184.77 

583.65 

254405.02 

32265.64 

6687.23 

1309.46 

16985.82 

806.97 

1739.12 

1271.88 

9610.14 

47983.54 

9406.21 

3593.14 


Totals 


$29840.18 


$7895.09 


$21945.09 


$388705.91 



SUMMARY COST OF CONSTRUCTION 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 



Sewer Main in feet 

Number of Filter Beds 

Number of Sludge Beds 

Cost to Abutters 

Cost to Town 


49494 


28 
3 


124519.78 
173009.16 


Totals 


49494 


31 


$297528.94 



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HIGHWAY AND PARKS 

To the Board of Public Works. 

Gentlemen: — I submit to you the eighth annual report of 
Highways, for the year ending December 31, 1920. While the 
policies of the previous year have been followed as closely as pos- 
sible, with the scarcity of labor and the increased cost of all ma- 
terials it has been a difficult problem to contend with, and there- 
fore has occasioned expenses that were not taken into con- 
sideration at the beginning of the year. 

Cleaning Streets 
The streets were cleaned in the Spring, gutters cleaned, and 
catch basins ; I would say the catch basins have been cleaned out 
four times during the year, and some a great many more. In the 
fall the leaves cause a great deal of trouble getting over the grates. 
We kept two men burning these for about one month, but it is 
impossible to keep them cleaned up, as so many of the property 
owners rake into the street and leave them there. As we have so 
many tarvia streets, I would recommend that another man with 
a hokey-pokey cart be kept going for at least five months in the 
summer. It would be a great improvement in the looks at a very 
small cost. 

Snow . 

On January 10th, the snow plows were out for the first time in 
1920, and from then until the snow was gone. We tried to keep 
the sidewalks and roads open to the best of our ability, but it 
was impossible to keep them open all the time. We spent on 
snow during 1920, $10,833.65 — the largest amount spent on 
snow for over twenty years. It was all for labor, teams and a 
few repairs to the plows. 

Sidewalks 

During 1920, there have been 810 feet of curbing set, 298 yards. 

granolithic walks, 497 yards sidewalk, 357 yards, resurfacing, 

494 yards of driveway, about 100 yards of gutter work. There 

have been cinders put on many sidewalks, and we would do more, 

24 



only it is getting almost impossible to get fine ones fit for this use. 
Sidewalks are needed in a great many places, and more should be 
done in 1921 than was done in 1920. More of the granolithic 
walks should be built such as were started on Main street, Mar- 
land Village, this summer. This work is not only necessary, but it 
adds value to the property which it borders, and is of a permanent 
nature. 

Blanketing of Streets 

This work is of a great necessity, because it covers two pur- 
poses. First, it helps to preserve the roads. Second, it acts as a 
dust layer. For these reasons we cannot afford to let this work go 
at all. As it is very plain to see, some of this work had to be ne- 
glected during 1920 and the roads show it. Now in 1921, we have 
to practically blanket every street we have, with a thin coat. of 
tarvia or asphalt and a covering of coarse sand. There is no use of 
building roads, if you do not take care of the ones already built. 
There was no oiling done in 1920. It will take 25,000 gallons of 
tarvia B or asphalt and about 750 loads of sand to do our blanket 
work in the spring of 1921. This will require an expenditure of 
$5000.00 for material alone. 

Highway Construction 

The only construction work done during the year, was Wolcott 
avenue, Lowell street and Main street. I will report each separ- 
ately. 

Wolcott Avenue 

There were added 900 yards to work done in 1919. This cost, 
$1492.37, divided as follows: 

Labor and teams $527.98 

Stone 463.61 

Freight 106.58 

Tarvia 339.20 

Use of roller 35 . 00 

Ashes 20.00 



$1492.37 
Or about $1.67 per yard. 

25 



Main Street 

This work from Chapel avenue to the State road was taken 
over by the State Department of Public Works, and let out by 
contract. The Lane Construction Company of Meriden, Conn., 
did the work for the State, as well as setting curbing and changing 
manhole covers, etc., for the Town. The Town spent on this 
work $11,806. 81. The following will show the cost to the Town, 
divided as follows: — 

State Dept. of Public Works $5600.00 

Lane Construction Company 1283.95 

Curbing, freight, and trucking 4341 . 75 

Police duty 519.37 

Trucking 61 . 74 



$11806.81 



There were set 2481 feet curbing. The cost to the State De- 
partment covered the extra width of road which was necessary. 

Lowell Street 

Work was started on Wednesday, June 16, 1920, at station 
14200 and was closed down for the year on November 15th, at 
station 20575, making 6575 of 18-foot roadway or about 12040 
square yards, at a cost of $37,500.00. The summary of approved 
bills will be shown in expenditure table. There is still available to 
start 1921 work, $16,500.00. In order to complete this work dur- 
ing 1921, it will be necessary to have an appropriation of $5000 
from each State, County and Town this year. There still re- 
main about 9600 yards to be done, and I hope this may be com- 
pleted in one job during 1921. 

Ballardvale District 

Many small repairs, such as cleaning gutters, catch basins and 
sidewalk work was all that was done in this section during 1920. 
Total spent in Ballardvale section with town team and Mr. 
Haggerty, $1499. 18. . At present there are two entrances to Bal- 
lardvale and whether you go And over Street or Woburn street, 

26 



in the fall and spring, neither is passable, for a motor vehicle. 
I would recommend a tarvia road from where the present one 
stops, to the top of hill near the School House, on Andover 
Street, and that cinders be put on Woburn street, on what is 
called 'The Plains," during 1921. 

Recommendations : 

Maintenance 

Labor and teams $12000.00 

Tarvia B, sand and gravel 5000.00 

Sidewalks 2000.00 

Gravel and ashes . . . . . 4500.00 

Snow 2000.00 

Drains 1500.00 

Bridges 1000.00 

Keeping team and car . . . . . . . . 900 . 00 

Miscellaneous 1100.00 



$30000.00 

This is a very important question, if we are to continue building 
roads, which of course we must, for the moment you stop repair- 
ing and blanketing your roads the moment they start to go to 
pieces and it costs twice as much to repair them. Your cinder 
roads we are building in the outside districts must have the sides 
dug out so water will have a place to run ; if not, why your road is 
the gutter and very soon your cinders are all down to the fields 
and brooks. The catch basins are increasing every year, and it 
costs more to keep these cleaned out. Your maintenance work is 
also getting toward the outskirts of the town and it costs for 
transportation back and forth. The appropriation is needed and 
will be needed for a great many years to keep things anywhere 
near normal. 

Construction 

Under this construction, we build what we term as permanent 
roads, and some sidewalk work. There are many roads to be 
built, some of which I will mention: Summer street, Andover 
street, Abbot street, Phillips street, Pearson street, Wolcott 
avenue, Whittier street. 

27 



Cinder roads in some of the outside sections where they will do 
for years are also charged up to this appropriation. I would 
recommend same appropriation as in 1920, $30,000.00. 



PARK DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation, March 1920 
Expenditures . 



Overdrawn 
Same appropriation will be necessary in 1921 



$1200.00 
$1506.93 

$306.93 
$1200.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Appropriation March 1920: 

Highway Department Maintenance 

Construction 

Lowell Street 

County, Lowell Street 

State, Lowell Street 

Credits 

Wolcott Avenue 

Overdrawn 



Expenditures: 

Maintenance 

Construction 

Lowell Street 

Snow 

Tools 

Bridges 

Sidewalks 

Drains 

Wolcott Avenue 



:e 


$30000.00 




30000.00 




5000.00 




12500.00 




12500.00 




6368.78 




1500.00 




3193.32 




$101062.10 


$26297.02 




22390.45 




37500.00 




10833.65 




123.98 




1025.40 




420.00 




979.23 




1492.37 




$101062.10 





28 



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TOWN OF ANDOVER 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Receipts and Expenditures 




FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1921 



ANDOVER, MASS. 

THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1922 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Almshouse Expenses " 

Personal Property at 59 

Relief out of 57 

Repairs on 55 

Special Committee Report 100 

Superintendent's Report 58 

Aiding Mothers 57 

Animal Inspector 69 

Appropriations, 1921 18 

Art Gallery 151 

Assessor's Report 60 

Assets 80 

Auditor's Report 95 

Ballard Vale School House 48 

Board of Health 37, 89 

Board of Public Works Appendix 

Sewer Sinking Funds 43 

Water Sinking Funds 43 

Bonds, Redemption of 49 

Brush Fires 35 

Building Inspectors' Report 70 

Collector's Account 78 

Cornell Fund 79 

County Tax 44 

Dog Tax 46 

Dump, Care of 47 

Fire Department 34, 88 

Finance Committee 1 16 

G. A. R. Post, 99 46 

Hay Scales 42 

Inspector of Buildings 70 

Insurance 42 

Interest 43 

Jury List 75 

Liabilities 80 

Memorial Day 46 





PAGE 


Memorial Hall Library 


44, 128 


Librarian's Report 


133 


Military Aid 


56 


Miscellaneous 


50 


Moth Superintendent's Report 


63 


Moth Suppression 


39 


Notes Given 


45 


Notes Paid 


45 


Overseers of the Poor 


52 


Police 


36,64 


Printing and Stationery 


38 


Punchard Free School, Report of 


Trustees 


93 


Representative Town Meeting 


101 


Retirement of Veterans 


47 


Schedule of Town Property 


71 


Schools 


29 


School Conditions in Shawsheen 


Village 


109 


Selectmen's Report 


29 


Soldier's Relief 


56 


Spring Grove Cemetery 


40, 67 


State Aid 


56 


State and Highway Tax 


44 


Street Lighting 


44 


Tax Collector 


77 


Town Farm Property 


48 


Town House 


32 


Town Meeting 


14 


Town Meeting, special 


25 


Town Officers 


4,31 


Town Warrant 


111 


Treasurer's Report 


80 


Tree Warden % 


61 


War Memorial Book 


48 



TOWN OFFICERS 1921 



Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor 



WALTER S. DONALD, Chairman 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN, Secretary 

Assessors 
WALTER S. DONALD, Chairman 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN, Secretary 



Term expires 1923 

11 1924 
<i 1922 

Term expires 1923 

" 1924 
ii 1922 



Town Clerk 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Tax Collector 
WILLIAM B. CHEEVER 

Town Treasurer 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 



School Committee 




MARY B. SMITH Term exp 


ires 1922 


ROY H. BRADFORD 


' 1922 


RALPH W. COLEMAN 


" 1922 


ALFRED E. STEARNS 


' 1923 


FREDERICK E. CHEEVER 


1 1923 


EDWARD C. CONROY 


' 1923 


EVERETT C. HILTON 


1 1924 


MARY W. FRENCH 


' 1924 


DAVID R. LAWSON 


' 1924 



Superintendent of Schools 
HENRY C. SANBORN 

Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund Commission 
ARTHUR T. BOUTWELL Term expires 1922 

BARNETT ROGERS " " 1922 

THOMAS E. RHODES " " 1923 

PHILIP L. HARDY " " 1924 

WILLIAM D. McINTYRE " " 1924 



Superintendent of Water, Sewer Department, Highways and Parks 
FRANK L. COLE 

Engineers of Fire Department 

CHARLES F. EMERSON, Chief 

LLEWELLYN D. POMEROY, Clerk 
HARRY E. WELLS 



Board of Health 

CHARLES E. ABBOTT, M. D. 
BANCROFT T. HAYNES 
FRANKLIN H. STACEY 



Term expires 1922 
" 1923 
" 1924 



Chief of Police 
FRANK M. SMITH 



Constables 



GEORGE W. MEARS 
FRANK M. SMITH 
THOMAS F. DAILEY 



Term expires 1922 
11 1922 
" 1922 



Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 

CHARLES U. BELL 

ALFRED E. STEARNS 

BURTON S. FLAGG 

E. KENDALL JENKINS 

REV. FREDERICK A. WILSON 

FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 

NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 



Term expires 1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 



Trustees of Punchard Free School — Terms expire 1922 

FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL MYRON E. GUTTERSON 
HARRY H. NOYES WILLIAM ODLIN 

EDMOND E. HAMMOND 

5 



A uditors 

JOHN S. ROBERTSON WALTER H. COLEMAN 

HARRY SELLARS 

Trustees of Cornell Fund 

CHARLES N. MARLAND Term expires 1922 

JOHN C. ANGUS " " 1923 

DR. WILLIAM D. WALKER " " 1924 

Superintendent of Moth Department 
EDWARD H. BERRY 

Tree Warden 
EDWARD H. BERRY 

Moderator of Town Meetings 
ALFRED L. RIPLEY 

Registrars of Voters 
SAMUEL P. HULME JOHN F. HURLEY 

PATRICK J. SCOTT GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Clerk 

Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery 

WALTER I. MORSE DANIEL H. POOR 

GEORGE D. MILLETT WARREN L. JOHNSON 

FRED E. CHEEVER DAVID R. LAWSON 

JOHN W. STARK 

Street Lighting Committee 
WALTER H. COLEMAN HENRY J. GARDNER 

FREDERIC G. MOORE JOSEPH L. BURNS 

FRED G. CHENEY 

Finance Committee 
HENRY A. BODWELL, Chairman GEORGE ABBOT 
JOHN C. ANGUS, Secretary J. HARRY CAMPION 

EDWARD V. FRENCH CHESTER W. HOLLAND 

GEORGE L. AVERILL 



TOWN WARRANT 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ssl: To either of the Constables of the Town of An- 
dover : Greeting. 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to 
vote in town affairs to meet and assemble at the Town House, in 
said Andover, on Monday, the seventh day of March, 1921, at 
6 o'clock a.m., to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To choose a Moderator for one year, Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for one 
year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, one 
member of the Board of Assessors for three years, three members 
of the School Committee for three years, two members of the 
Board of Public Works for three years, one member of the Board 
of Health for three years, three Auditors of Accounts for one 
year, three Constables for one year, one Trustee of Memorial Hall 
Library for seven years, one Tree Warden for one year, one 
Trustee of Cornell Fund for three years, two Trustees of Punch- 
ard Free School for one year, and any other officers the town may 
determine to choose. 

Article 2. — To take action on the following question, Shall 
licenses be granted for the sale of certain non-intoxicating bever- 
ages in this town? 

Article 3. — To determine what sums of money shall be appro- 
priated for Almshouse Expenses, Repairs on Almshouse, Relief 
out of Almshouse, Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children, 
Board of Health, Brush Fires,* Fire Department, Hay Scales, 

7 



Highway Department, Insurance, Interest, Memorial Hall 
Library, Memorial Day, Post 99, G. A. R., Miscellaneous, Parks 
and Playsteads, Police, Printing and Stationery, Public Dump, 
Retirement of Veterans, Redemption of Water, Sewer, and High 
School Bonds, Schools, Sewer Maintenance, Sewer Sinking 
Funds, Soldiers' Relief, Spring Grove Cemetery, State Aid, 
Street Lighting, Town Officers, Town House, Tree Warden, Moth 
Department, Water Maintenance, Construction and Sinking 
Funds, and other town charges and expenses. 

Article 4. — To see if the Town will vote to build a main sewer 
on Poor Street and North Main Street, a distance of about 1800 
feet, and appropriate the sum of $3500 for same. Work to be done 
under the direction of the Board of Public Works, and to assess 
betterments upon the estates benefited by said extension, on 
petition of Carl L. Svenson and others. 

Article 5. — To see if the Town will vote to build a sewer from 
Main Street, westerly through Lowell Street as far as the house 
of Richard Ward, and appropriate a sum of money therefor, on 
petition of Walter M. Lamont and others. 

Article 6. — To see if the Town will vote to build a sewer 
through Haverhill Street from the present sewer at the intersec- 
tion of York Street, easterly for a distance of about 2300 feet to 
a point at or near Stirling Street, and appropriate a sum of money 
therefor on petition of John Traynor and others. 

Article 7. — To see if the town will accept and adopt as a part 
of its sewage system, certain sewers constructed in Shawsheen 
Village, so called, as follows: — A ten inch sewer on Haverhill 
Street extending from the Main Sewer west of the Haverhill 
Street bridge to the centre of York Street and an eight inch sewer 
on North Main Street starting at a point at or near the property 
of Dr. George B. Elliott and running southerly along North Main 
Street and connecting with the Main sewer ; also when completed 
the sewage pumping station at Shawsheen Village and the 12 inch 
main extending to the filter beds. 

Article 8. — To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to make investigations and report at the next An- 



nual Meeting on a system of sewage disposal and appropriate the 
sum of one thousand dollars to defray the expenses of such inves- 
tigation, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 9. — To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to expend the amount of money now in the treas- 
ury to the credit of the Water Loan for the purpose of relaying 
pipes and making small extensions, on petition of the Board of 
Public Works. 

Article 10. — To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to extend the water main from the residence of 
Charles G. E. Anderson, Ballardvale Road, to Edward Dimmock, 
and appropriate a sum of money therefor, on petition of Charles 
G. E. Anderson and others. 

Article 11. — To see if the Town will appropriate a sum not 
exceeding $5000, to complete the macadam on Lowell Street; the 
same to equal an amount which the State and County will sever- 
ally appropriate, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 12. — To hear and act on the report of the committee 
appointed to consider the sale of the Andover Town Farm, or 
change in method of operating the same. 

Article 13. — To hear and act upon the report of the committee 
appointed to consider the question of a suitable memorial to 
citizens of Andover who served in the World War, the questions 
for consideration to be as follows: 

(a) Will the town approve the recommendation that 
the said memorial shall take the form of a new civic cen- 
tre on the land bounded by Main Street, Chestnut 
Street, Bartlet Street and Punchard Avenue? 

(b) Will the town authorize the Selectmen to petition 
the General Court for authority to appropriate, outside 
of the debt limit now authorized by law, a sum of mon- 
ey not exceeding $300,000, to be used for the purpose of 
acquiring and improving said area, and, the erection of 
such buildings as shall be authorized ? 



(c) Will the town authorize the appointment of a 
committee of seven citizens to be known as a "Com- 
mittee on War Memorial and Civic Centre," to make a 
study of all conditions involved in a proper development 
of such a civic centre, prepare plans for a beginning of 
the undertaking, to include the immediate construction 
of a new town building, designed to be later supple- 
mented by such other development as the town may 
from time to time authorize, and to further consider and 
act upon any matters relating to the question ? 

Article 14. — To hear and act on the report of the Board of 
Public Works as to its conclusions and recommendations on the 
status of the Water Department, covering the question of rates, 
charges for fire service and other public services, and the advisa- 
bility of having this Department operated as a self-supporting 
Department. 

Article 15. — To see if the town will accept as a town way, 
as laid out by the Selectmen, the street now known as Warwick 
Street in Shawsheen Village, so called, running from a point on 
North Main Street northerly about eleven hundred (1100) feet 
from the Post Office and westerly to Poor Street, on petition of 
William M. Wood and others. 

Article 16. — To see if the town will accept as a town way, as 
laid out by the Selectmen, the street now known as Windsor 
Street in Shawsheen Village, so called, running from a point on 
North Main Street northerly about seven hundred (700) feet 
from the Post Office and westerly to Poor Street, opposite the 
residence of Henry Todd, on petition of William M. Wood and 
others. 

Article 17. — To see if the Town will accept as a town way, as 
laid out by the Selectmen, the street known as Canterbury Street 
in Shawsheen Village, so called, from a point south of 59 Lowell 
Street, westerly six hundred (600) feet to an open lot, on petition 
of William M. Wood and others. 

10 



Article 18. — To see if the town will accept as a town way, as 
laid out by the Selectmen, the street known as Balmoral Street in 
Shawsheen Village, so called, from a point on North Main Street 
about five hundred (500) feet southerly from the Post Office to 
Burnham Road, on petition of William M. Wood and others. 

Article 19. — To see whether the Town will vote to instruct the 
Selectmen to release a certain right of way for the maintenance of 
drainage pipes over the premises of Albert L. Hall and Clyde A. 
White, located on the northerly side of Park Street, in said An- 
dover, upon such terms and conditions as may be acceptable to 
the Board of Selectmen and to the Board of Public Works, on 
petition of Albert L. Hall and others. 

Article 20. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$2000, to place fire escapes on and otherwise put in a suitable 
condition the Old Schoolhouse building in Ballardvale to com- 
ply with the regulations and orders of the Building Inspectors' 
Department of the State Police. 

Article 21. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$6000 for tearing down and reconstructing the tomb in Spring 
Grove Cemetery, on petition of the Board of Trustees. 

Article 22. — To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen 
to dispose of the Steam Fire Engine now located in the Central 
Fire Station. 

Article 23. — To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of 
money to place an electric light on Salem Street between Prospect 
Hill Road and the Woodbridge Cider Mill, on petition of Ernest 
A. Braddon and others. 

Article 24. — To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money for an electric light in front of the Tyer Rubber Company, 
on petition of Dionisio Michelini and others. 

Article 25. — To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of 
money to place a fire alarm box at or near the junction of Salem 

11 



Street and Prospect Hill Road, on petition of Ernest A. Braddon 
and others. 

Article 26. — To see if the town will accept the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 94, Section 120, as follows: — 

" In towns having less than ten thousand inhabitants 
which accept this Section or have accepted corresponding 
provisions of earlier laws at any Annual Town Meeting, 
the annual license fee for carrying on the business of 
slaughtering neat cattle, sheep or swine shall be such sum 
not exceeding one hundred dollars as the selectmen fix, 
on petition of the Board of Health." 

Article 27. — To see if the Town will name as Chestnut Lane 
the town way leading from River Road at a point east of the 
Shattuck Farm past the property of Jane Devlin. 

Article 28. — To see what action the Town will take in regard 
to a certain fund left by the late Anna Holt for the benefit of the 
Scotland District School and held in trust by Brooks F. Holt. 

Article 29. — To see if the Town will accept as a gift from the 
late Edward R. Lemon, a native of Andover, an oil painting of 
"Washington at Monmouth" and a bust of Longfellow. 

Article 30. — To fix the pay of the call firemen for the ensuing 
year. 

Article 31. — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 32. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in anticipation of the revenue of the cur- 
rent financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

Article 33. — To determine what disposition shall be made of 
unexpended appropriations. 

Article 34. — To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

12 



Article 35. — To determine the amount of money to be raised 
by taxation the ensuing year. 

Article 36. — To transact any other business that may le- 
gally come before the meeting. 

The polls will be open from 6 o'clock a.m. to 5 o'clock p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof, seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your do- 
ings thereon, at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this twenty- third day of February, A.D. 
1921. 

WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Selectmen of Andover 



Andover, March 7th, 1921. 
Essex, ss. 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants 
of said town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes 
stated in said warrant by posting a true and attested copy of the 
same on the Town House, on each schoolhouse and in no less 
than five other public places, where bills and notices are usually 
posted, and by publication in the Andover Townsman. Said 
warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

FRANK M. SMITH, 

Constable 



13 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 7, 1921 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of And over 
qualified to vote in town affairs convened in the Town House in 
said Andover on Monday the Seventh day of March 1921 at six 
o'clock in the forenoon, agreeably to the requirements of the 
foregoing warrant, Moderator Alfred L. Ripley presided and after 
reading a part of the warrant, it was voted to dispense with the 
further reading of the warrant. 

Voted, To take up Articles 1 and 2 and proceeded to vote for 
Town Officers and on the Liquor License question by the Austra- 
lian Ballot System. 

The ballot box was found to be empty and registered 0000. 
The polls opened at 6 o'clock a.m., and closed at 5 o'clock p.m. 
The total number of ballots cast was 843. 

The result of the balloting was as follows: — 

Moderator — One year: 

Alfred L. Ripley 687 

Blanks 156 

Town Clerk — One Year : 

George A. Higgins 709 

Blanks 134 

Town Treasurer — One Year : 

George A. Higgins 697 

Blanks 146 

Selectmen — Three Years : 

Charles Bowman 705 

Blanks 138 

Assessor — Three Years : 

Charles Bowman 673 

Blanks 170 

14 



Collector of Taxes — One Year : 

William B. Cheever 700 

Blanks 143 

School Committee — Three Years 

Mary W. French 652 

Everett C. Hilton 646 

David R. Lawson 649 

Blanks 582 

Trustee Punchard Free School — One year (to fill vacancies) 

William Odlin 623 

Edmond E. Hammond 629 

Blanks 434 

Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund Commission — 
Three years: 

Philip L. Hardy 674 

William D. Mclntyre 629 

Blanks 383 

Board of Health — Three Years : 



franklin hi. btacey 


596 


John Tray nor 


1 


Blanks 


246 


Auditors of Accounts — One Year : 




Walter H. Coleman 


642 


John S. Robertson 


666 


Harry Sellars 


646 


Blanks 


575 



Trustee of Memorial Hall Library — Seven Years : 

Nathan C. Hamblin 650 

Blanks 193 

Constables — One Year : 

Thomas F. Dailey 393 

George W. Mears 524 

Frank M. Smith 575 

George N. Sparks 522 

Blanks 515 

15 



Tree Warden — One year : 

Edward H. Berry 665 

Blanks 178 

Shall Licenses be granted for the sale of certain non-intoxicating 
beverages in this town? 

Yes 323 

No 451 

Blanks 69 

All the foregoing officers and questions were voted on by ballot 
and the check lists were used. 



REPORT OF THE PRECINCT CLERK 

Andover, Mass., March 7th, 1921. 

Polls opened at 6 a.m. Warden George L. Averill in charge. 
Polls closed at 5 p.m. Ballot Box registered at opening 0000. 
Ballot Box registered when closed 843. Number of ballots re- 
ceived 3851. Number of ballots cast 843. Number of ballots 
returned to Town Clerk 3008. 

MARK M. KEANE, Clerk 

The Moderator declared : 
Alfred L. Ripley elected Moderator for one year. 
George A. Higgins elected Town Clerk for one year. 
George A. Higgins elected Town Treasurer for one year. 
Charles Bowman elected Selectman for three years. 
Charles Bowman elected Assessor for Three years. 
William B. Cheever elected Collector of Taxes for one year. 
Mary W. French elected School Committee for three years. 
Everett C. Hilton elected School Committee for three years. 
David R. Lawson elected School Committee for three years. 

16 



William Odlin elected Trustee Punchard Free School for one 
year. 

Edmond E. Hammond elected Trustee Free School for one 
year. 

Philip L. Hardy elected Board of Public Works, and Sinking 
Fund Commission for three years. 

William D. Mclntyre elected Board of Public Works and Sink- 
ing Fund Commission for three years. 

Franklin H. Stacey elected Board of Health for three years. 

Walter H. Coleman elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

John S. Robertson elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

Harry Sellars elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

George N. Sparks elected Constable for one year. 

George W. Mears elected Constable for one year. 

Frank M. Smith elected Constable for one year. 

Nathan C. Hamblin elected Trustee of Memorial Hall Library 
for seven years. 

Edward H. Berry elected Tree Warden for one year. 

Chose Trustee of Cornell Fund for three years: — W. Dacre 
Walker. . 

Chose Street Lighting Committee for one year (appointed by 
Moderator): Walter H. Coleman, Fred G. Cheney, Henry J. 
Gardner, Joseph L. Burns, Frederic G. Moore. 

Chose Finance Committee for one year (appointed by Mod- 
erator) : George Abbot, Henry A. Bodwell, John H. Campion, 
Edward V. French, Chester W. Holland, John C. Angus, George 
L. Averill. 

Voted at 5.10 p.m. that the meeting be adjourned to Monday, 
March 14, 1921 at 2 o'clock p.m. 

17 



2 O'CLOCK P. M. MONDAY, MARCH 14th, 1921. 



Took up Article 3. 




Voted — To appropriate the following stated 


sums of money : — 


Almshouse 


$ 5000.00 


Almshouse repairs 


300.00 


Almshouse — Relief out 


4000.00 


Aiding Mothers with Dependent children 


2500.00 


Board of Health 


3000.00 


Brush Fires 


600.00 


Fire Department 


23000.00 


Hay Scales 


125.00 


Highway Department 




Maintenance 


30000.00 


New Construction 


30000.00 


Fire Insurance 


3000.00 


Workmen's Compensation 


2500.00 


Interest 


17500.00 


Library 


3000.00 


Memorial Day 


600.00 


G. A. R. 


100.00 


Miscellaneous 


3000.00 


Parks and Playsteads 


1200.00 


Police 


9000.00 


Printing and Stationery 


1800.00 


Public Dump 


75.00 


Retirement of Veterans 


300.00 


Retirement of Bonds 




Water 


8000.00 


Punchard School 


6000.00 


Sewer 


6141.78 


Schools 


103475.00 


Sewer Department 




Labor and Power 


3000.00 


Sinking Fund 


1000.00 


Soldier's Relief 


1500.00 


Amount carried froward 


$269716.78 



18 



$269716.78 
1500.00 
1000.00 
7900.00 



Amount brought forward 
Spring Grove Cemetery (and receipts 1 ) 
State Aid 
Street Lighting 

Voted, that the Street Lighting Committee be 
instructed and authorized to execute a new con- 
tract for lighting the streets of Andover with the 
Lawrence Gas Company for a term not exceeding 
three years and on the best terms possible to obtain. 
Town Officers 
Town House 

Tree Warden and Moth Work 
Water Department 
Article 4 — (Poor Street Sewer) 
Article 6 — (Haverhill Street Sewer) 
Article 8 — (Board of Public Works) 
Article 11 — (Lowell Street) 
Article 13 — (War Memorial) 
Article 20 — (B. V. Schoolhouse) 
Article 21 — (Tomb) 



State Tax and Highway Tax (estimate) 
County Tax (estimate) 



$399016.78 
Took up Article 4. 

Voted, That Articles 4, 5, and 6 be laid on the table until after 
the consideration of Article 7. 

Took up Article 7. 

Voted, at 3.17 p.m., That the town accept and adopt as a part 
of its sewerage system the sewers named in this article as the same 
are shown on a plan entitled "Plan showing Shawsheen Village 
Sewerage System" drawn by John Franklin, C. E. 1920 and ap- 
proved by the State Board of Health August 26th, 1920. 

Said plan has also been approved by the board of Public Works 
and is on file in the office of said board. 



8900. 


00 


3000. 


00 


7000.00 


20750.00 


3500. 


00 


8750 


.00 


1000 


.00 


5000 


.00 


2000.00 


2000 


.00 


6000.00 


$348016.78 


35000.00 


16000 


.00 



19 



Took up Article 4. 

Voted, at 3.35 p.m., That the town build a main sewer on 
Poor Street and North Main Street, a distance of about 1800 
feet and appropriate the sum of $3500. for the same. Work to 
be done under the direction of the Board of Public Works, and to 
assess betterments upon the estates benefited by said extension. 

Took up Article 5. 

Voted, at 3.36 p.m., That it be stricken from the warrant. 

Took up Article 6. 

Voted, at 3.38 p.m., To build a sewer through Haverhill Street 
from the present sewer at the intersection of York Street, easterly 
for a distance of about 2300 feet to a point at or near Stirling 
Street and appropriate the sum of $8750. for the same; also to 
assess betterments on the estates benefited by said extension. 

Took up Article 8. 

Voted, at 3.47 p.m., To authorize the Board of Public Works 
to make investigations and report at the next annual town meeting 
on a system of sewage disposal and to appropriate the sum of 
$1000 to defray the expenses of such investigation. 

Took up Article 9. 

Voted, at 3.48 p.m., To authorize the Board of Public Works 
to expend the money in the Treasury to the credit of the Water 
Loan for the purpose of relaying pipes and making small ex- 
tensions. 

Took up Article 10. 

Voted, at 4.05 p.m., That the Board of Public Works be in- 
structed to extend the water main from the residence of Charles 
R. E. Anderson, Ballard Vale Road to the residence of Edward 
Dimmock, the expense of same to be.paid out of available funds 
received under Article 9. 

Took up Article 11. 

Voted, at 4.06 p.m., That the town appropriate a sum not 
exceeding $5000. to complete the macadam on Lowell Street; the 

20 



same to equal an amount which the State and County will sever- 
ally appropriate. 

Took up Article 12. 

Voted, at 4.09 p.m., That the report of the committee on the 
Town Farm be accepted and adopted and that the Selectmen be 
authorized to offer at public sale all of the surplus land not needed 
for the improvements suggested in their report, and that they 
also be authorized to expend out of the amount secured from the 
sale such money as may be necessary to satisfactorily remodel 
and improve the present main town farm building. 

Took up Article 13. 

Voted, at 5.44 p.m., That it is the sense of this meeting that the 
town adopt the policy of creating a worthy memorial to 
citizens of Andover who served in the World War. 

That a committee of seven citizens be appointed to consider 
plans for the taking of a suitable site to provide for the construc- 
tion of a memorial to be so located as to possibly form a part of 
a civic centre with such further additions and improvements as 
may be hereafter approved by the vote of the town. 

That said committee shall be authorized to present at the next 
annual town meeting the result of its studies, together with defi- 
nite recommendations for financing all or a part of the completed 
plan. 

That said committee shall be authorized to petition the General 
Court of 1922 for such legislation as may be necessary to carry 
out the plan it may recommend, said legislation to be effective 
only upon the adoption and approval of same by a vote of the 
citizens of the town at an annual town meeting in 1922 or 1923. 

For the purposes of making studies, determining costs, and 
carrying on other investigations, there is appropriated for use of 
the committee the sum of $2000. The Moderator appointed 
*John N. Cole, John F. O'Connell, Burton S. Flagg, C. H. Forbes, 
Henry A. Bodwell, E. V. French, E. Barton Chapin. *Walter 
M. Lamont to succeed John N. Cole, resigned. 

21 



Took up Article 14. 

Voted, at 5.58 p.m., To accept and adopt trie report of the 
Board of Public Works (printed in full in annual report of Board 
of Public Works pages 10-15) as to its conclusions and recom- 
mendations on the status of the Water Department covering 
the question of rates, charges for fire service and other public 
services, and the advisability of having this Department operate 
as a self-supporting Department. 

Took up Article 15. 

Voted, to take up Articles 15, 16, 17 and 18 together and 

Voted, at 5.59 p.m., To accept as town ways the following 
named streets in Shawsheen Village, so called, as laid out by the 
Selectmen ; 

Warwick Street running from a point on North Main Street 
northerly about eleven hundred (1100) feet from the Post Office 
and westerly to Poor Street; 

Windsor Street running from a point on North Main Street 
northerly about seven hundred (700) feet from the Post Office 
and westerly to Poor Street, opposite the residence of Henry 
Todd; 

Canterbury Street from a point south of 59 Lowell Street, 
westerly six hundred (600) feet to an open lot. 

Balmoral Street from a point on North Main Street about five 
hundred (500) feet southerly from the Post Office to Burnham 
Road. 

Took up Article 19. 

Voted, at 6 p.m., That article be stricken from warrant. 

Took up Article 20. 

Voted, at 6.02 p.m., To appropriate the sum of $2000. to 
place fire escapes on and otherwise put in a suitable condition the 
Old Schoolhouse building in Ballard Vale. 

Took up Article 21. 

Voted, at 6.05 p.m., To appropriate the sum of $6000. for the 
purpose of tearing down and reconstructing the tomb in Spring 
Grove Cemetery. 

22 






Took up Article 22. 

Voted, at 6.07 p.m., To authorize the Selectmen to dispose of 
the Steam Fire Engine located in the Central Fire Station. 

Took up Articles 23-24. 

Voted, at 6.08 p.m., To take up these articles together and 
that they be referred to the Street Lighting Committee. 

Took up Article 25. 

Voted, at 6.10 p.m., To refer to the Board of Selectmen with 
power to act. 

Took up Article 26. 

Voted at 6.12 p.m., To accept the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 94. Section 120, as follows: — 

"In towns having less than ten thousand inhabitants which 
accept this Section or have accepted corresponding provisions of 
earlier laws at any Annual Town Meeting, the annual license fee 
for carrying on the business of slaughtering meat cattle, sheep or 
swine shall be such sum not exceeding one hundred dollars as the 
selectmen fix". 

Took up Article 27. 

Voted, at 6.13 p.m., To name as Chestnut Lane the town way 
leading from River Road at a point east of the Shattuck Farm 
past the property of Jane Devlin. 

Took up Article 28. 

Voted, at 6.14 p.m., That the town accept the fund left by the 
late Anna Holt and that the income from said fund be applied 
for the benefit of the John Dove and Stowe Schools, where pupils, 
of the Scotland District attend. 

Took up Article 29. 

Voted at 6.17 p.m., To accept as a gift from the late Edward 
R. Lemon, a native of Andover, an oil painting of "Washington 
at Monmouth" and a bust of Longfellow and that the Town 
Clerk be instructed to extend the thanks of the citizens in town 
meeting assembled to Mrs. Lemon for these gifts. 

23 



Took up Article 30. 

Voted, at 6. 19- p.m., That the pay of the call firemen at the 
Central Fire Station be $150. per year and at the station in 
Ballard Vale, $75. 

Took up Article 31. 

Voted, at 6.20 p.m., That the taxes be collected by the Col- 
lector, that he receive a salary of $1800. per year, and that in- 
terest be charged at the rate of six per cent per annum from 
October 15 on all taxes remaining unpaid after November 1st. 

Took up Article 32. 

Voted, at 6.21 p.m., That the Town Treasurer, with the ap- 
proval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning January 1, 1921 and to issue a note or 
notes therefor, payable within one year, any debt or debts in- 
curred under this vote to be paid from the revenue of said finan- 
cial year. 

Took up Article 33. 

Voted, at 6.22 p.m., That all unexpended appropriations be 
turned into the treasury. 

Took up Article 34. 

Voted, at 6.23 p.m., That the report of the Town Officers be 
accepted. 

Took up Article 35. 

Voted, at 6.24 p.m., To raise by taxation $258,000 and also 
an amount sufficient to meet the State and County taxes after 
deducting receipts from the State Income Tax. 

Took up Article 36. 

Voted, at 6.25 p.m., That the meeting be dissolved. 
The foregoing is a true copy of the warrant and of the Officers 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings of the regular 
and adjourned meetings. 

Attest: 

GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Town Clerk 

24 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, NOVEMBER 20, 1921, 

WARRANT 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ss.: To either of the Constables of the Town of An- 
dover, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to 
vote in town affairs to meet and assemble at the Town House in 
said Andover, on Tuesday, the First Day of November, 1921, 
at 7.30 o'clock p.m., to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To hear and act upon a certain proposal to be sub- 
mitted to said meeting by William M. Wood for the purchase of 
the remainder of the Town Farm property on petition of William 
M. Wood and others. 

Article 2. — To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 
sum of five thousand ($5000) dollars for the purpose of extending 
the sewerage system from the main trunk line on Haverhill Street 
up Lowell Street to Canterbury Street, a distance of about 2000 
feet, and to assess betterments upon the estates benefited by 
said extension, on petition of the Board of Health. 

Article 3. — To see if the Town will vote to accept the pro- 
visions of Section 20, Chapter 39 of the General Laws, relative to 
precinct voting and the holding of the annual town meeting. 

Article 4. — To act on any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof seven days at least before the time 
of said meeting as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

25 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this Twentieth day of October, A.D. 
1921. 

WALTERS. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Selectmen of Andover 



Andover, November 1st, 1921 
Essex, ss. 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabi- 
tants of said town to meet at the time and place and for the pur- 
poses stated in said warrant by posting a true and attested copy 
of the same on the Town House, on each schoolhouse and in no 
less than five other public places, where bills and notices are 
usually posted, and by publication in the Andover Townsman. 
Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

FRANK M. SMITH 

Constable 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to vote in town affairs convened in the Town House in 
said Andover on Tuesday, the first day of November, 1921 at 
7.30 o'clock in the evening, agreeably to the requirements of the 
foregoing warrant, Moderator Alfred L. Ripley presided and 
read the warrant. 

Took up Article 1. 

Voted, at 7.45 p.m., That the town accept the following pro- 
posal submitted by William M. Wood, for the purchase of the 
remainder of the Town Farm property; "The Board of Directors 
of the American Woolen Company offers the sum of Fifteen 
Thousand ($15000.) dollars for the remainder of the land and 
buildings known as the Town of Andover Poor Farm situated in 

26 



Shawsheen Village west of the Boston & Maine Railroad tracks 
in said Andover. It being understood that the buildings may be 
occupied and used by the Town until provision can be made for 
the removal of the inmates not later than October 1, 1922. The 
vote stood 107 for and 8 against acceptance. 

Took up Article 2. 

Voted, at 7.52 p.m., That the town appropriate the sum of 
five thousand (5000.) dollars for the purpose of extending the 
sewerage system from the main trunk line on Haverhill Street up 
Lowell Street to Canterbury Street, a distance of about 2000 feet 
and assess betterments upon the estates benefited by said ex- 
tension in accordance with the provisions of the Statutes govern- 
ing the assessment of betterments in Andover. Also that the 
Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be autho- 
rized to borrow the sum of $5000, the same to be paid from the 
tax levy of 1922. 

Took up Article 3. 

Voted, at 7.55 p.m., To accept the provisions of Section 20, 
Chapter 39 of the General Laws, relative to precinct voting and 
the holding of the annual town meeting. 

Took up Article. 4. 

Voted, at 7.57 p.m., That the Selectmen be requested to con- 
sider the need of establishing additional voting precincts in the 
town. If they decide that the same should be established before 
the next annual town election they are requested to report rela- 
tive thereto with their recommendations, to a special town meeting 
to be held not later than February 1, 1922. If said report is not 
made to such special meeting it is to be made to the next annual 
town meeting. 

Voted, at 7.59 p.m., That the school committee be requested 
to make a survey of school conditions in Shawsheen Village 
covering present school population and school house accomoda- 
tions; also such further study as is necessary to properly antici- 
pate and provide for public school needs of that section of the 

27 



town, and report the result of such survey and study to the next 
Annual Town Meeting. 

Voted at 8.05 p.m., That the Moderator appoint a Committee 
of five to consider the matter of Representative Town Meetings 
and report at the next Annual Town Meeting; the Moderator 
appointed the following Committee: Dr. Charles E. Abbott, B. 
H. Hayes, Joseph L. Burns, George L. Averill, George A. Higgins. 

Voted, at 8.14 p.m., That the Selectmen be a committee to 
consider ways and means for housing the inmates of the Town 
Farm ; that they have power to add two other persons to the com- 
mittee, and that $300. be allowed for necessary expenses, the 
result of their investigations to be reported at the next Annual 
town meeting. 

Voted, at 8.15 p.m., That the meeting be dissolved. 

The foregoing is a true copy of the warrant and of the officers' 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

Attest:- 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Town Clerk 



28 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT 



SCHOOLS 



GENERAL EXPENSE 




Salaries : 










Superintendent 


$3800.00 






Attendance Officer 


100. 


,00 






Clerk 


574. 


90 


$4474, 


on 








. vu 


Miscellaneous 


133.01 
S OF INSTRl 


133 


,01 


EXPENSE 


JCTION 




Supervisors : 










Salaries 






4014 


.27 


Travelling Expenses 






102 


,92 


Teachers : 






High 






14661 


.36 


Elementary 






44164 


.81 


Textbooks: 






High 






1266. 


65 


Elementary 






1469 


,82 


Supplies: 






High 






1328 


,40 


Elementary 






1358, 


.32 



4607.91 



4117.19 



58826.17 



2736.47 



2686.72 



A mount carried forward 



29 



$723974.46 



EXPENSES OF OPERATION 

Amount brought forward $72974.46 

Janitors 6916.20 

Fuel 5851.11 

Miscellaneous 854.27 

13621.58 

MAINTENANCE 
Repairs 3871.72 

3871.72 

AUXILIARY AGENCIES 

Health 1316.45 

Transportation 5820 . 55 

7137.00 

MISCELLANEOUS 
Tuition 673.30 

Sundries 1118.65 

1791.95 

NEW EQUIPMENT 
New Equipment 1891 . 89 1891 . 89 

SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND 
EXPENDITURES 

Appropriation $103475 . 00 

Total Expenditures 101288 . 60 

Balance $2186.40 



30 



TOWN OFFICERS 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 

Walter S. Donald, Chairman Selectman 

& Assessor 
Charles Bowman, Selectman & Assessor 
Andrew McTernen, Selectman & Assessor 
George A. Higgins, Town Clerk 
George A. Higgins, Town Treasurer 
William B. Cheever, Tax Collector 
William C. Crowley, Sealer, weights and 

measures 
Joseph I. Pitman, Building Inspector 
J. J. Daly, Town Physician 
Smart & Flagg Agents, Surety Bonds 
D. J. Murphy, Town Counsel 
W. H. Coleman, Auditor 
John S. Robertson, Auditor 
Harry Sellars, Auditor 
Election Officers, Prec. No. 1 
Registrar of Voters 
Alvah P. Wright, Field Driver 
Alfred L. Ripley* Moderator 

Total expenditure $8648 . 19 

Balance 251.81 



$8900.00 



$900. 


00 


800. 


00 


800. 


00 


1200. 


00 


1200. 


.00 


1800. 


00 


206 


.26 


499 


.94 


200 


.00 


180 


.00 


375 


.00 


95 


.83 


95 


.83 


95 


.83 


107. 


,50 


. 57. 


.00 


25 


.00 


10 


.00 



$8900.00 $8900.00 



31 



TOWN HOUSE 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 

George W. Mears, janitor $836.00 

Lawrence Gas Co., lighting 351 . 24 

C. A. Hill & Co., elec. supplies , 68.80 

Andover Coal Co., fuel 890.45 

Gray and Kendall, repairs 99.72 

C. S. Buchan, awnings and repairs 67.05 

M! T. Walsh, plumbing repairs 78.36 
Daniel P. Webster, police duty at Town 

House 59.50 

David M. May, police duty 39.50 

James W T . Walker, police duty 12.00 

Charles Shorten, police duty 3.00 

James Holt, repairs 65 . 55 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 39.95 
H. I. Dallman Co., mops, cheese cloth, etc. 56. 73 

Cheshire Chemical Co., dust void 18.00 

Knipe Brothers, labor and repairs 31.97 

J. W. Richardson, repairs 29.96 

Annie F. Borwon, laundry 4.74 

Anderson & Bowman,, repairing 1.55 

C. F. Emerson, carting 17.50 

Peoples' Ice Co., ice 22.00 

William C. Brown 16.00 

Ralph Berry, lettering doors 31.50 

W. H. Sylvester, tuning piano 3.00 

E. T. Hethrington, salt and bon ami 1 . 10 

Holden Brothers, painting 8.40 

American Railway Express Co., express .87 



$3000.00 



Amount carried forward 



$2854.44 



32 



Amount brought forward 

Beach Soap Co., powder and soap 
Treat Hardware Corp., steel wool 
"The Whatnot", supplies 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



$2854.44 



6.10 
.60 
.20 



$2861.34 
138.66 



$3000.00 $3000.00 



33 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Fire Department 








Appropriation, March 7, 1 


L921 




$23000.00 


Earnings Dept. teams 






1643.25 


Salaries, engineers 




$800.00 




Wages, permanent men 




11236.87 




Wages, call men 




3200.00 




Wages, fire alarm 




539.50 




Horses and care of same 




1237.02 




Equipment and repairs 




3107.39 




Fuel and light 




1076.67 




Maintenance of buildings 


and grounds 


518.44 




Fire alarm 




2346.07 




Miscellaneous expenses 




463.10 




Total expenditure 


24525.06 




Balance 




118.19 






$24643.25 


$24643 . 25 



34 



BRUSH FIRES 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 




$600.00 


Cash % 




6.00 


Brush Fire Pay Rolls 


$570.00 




Geo. H. Hadley Co., soda 


19.60 




A. Lee Co., soda 


24.45 




Badger Fire Extinguisher Co., supplies 


. 2.40 




State Forestry Dept., shovels 


17.50 




Boston-Lawrence Despatch, express 


3.32 




Joseph C. Terry 


6.50 




Total expenditure 


$643.77 




Overdrawn 




37.77 



$643.77 $643.77 



35 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 




$9000.00 


Salary, chief 


1872.00 




Pay roll, patrolmen 


5892.00 




Wages, specials 


962.96 




Automobile hire 


472.00 




Equipment and repairs 


157.34 • 




Telephones 


135.58 




Miscellaneous expenses 


189.41 




Total expenditure 


9681.29 




Overdrawn 




681.29 



$9681.29 $9681.29 



36 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 

C. E. Abbott, M. D., salary Board of 

Health 
C. E. Abbott, M. D., fumigating 
B. T. Haynes, salary 
B. T. Haynes, fumigating 
F. H. Stacey, salary Board of Health 
F. H. Stacey, Milk Inspector 
F. H. Stacey, expenses 
Charles H. Newton, Inspector 
Lotta Johnson, Nurse and Clerk 
Lotta Johnson, Inspector 
Lotta Johnson, expenses and use of car 
City of Lawrence, Board 
Lakeville State Sanatorium, Board 
Westfield State Sanatorium, Board 
Joseph P. Nolan, Plumbing Inspector 
Elin C. Duane, quarantine 
R. M. Haynes, provisions 
James Waldie, quarantine 
Charles R. Hoffman, quarantine 
John S. Buchan, inspecting plumbing 
L. E. Knott Apparatus Co., supplies 
John S. Fraize, killing cats 
Mass. Association Board of Health 
John Colbath, labor 
The Andover Press, supplies 
Hobbs & Warren, book of permits 
W. J. Morrissey, auto hire 
Benjamin Jaques, fuel 
Joseph F. Kenney, provisions 

Total Expenditure 
Overdrawn 



$3000.00 



$ 75.00 

104.00 

50.00 

21.20 

50.00 

75.00 

43.50 

550.00 

1150.00 

166.66 

265.05 

94.50 

208.57 

134.28 

190.00 

27.00 

34.67 

48.00 

10.00 

12.00 

16.21 

4.00 

2.00 

5.00 

4.50 

1.81 

1.00 

8*. 50 

4.00 

$3356.45 



356.45 



$3356.45 $3356.45 



37 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 

The Andover Press, advertising, print- 
ing & supplies 
The Birmingham Pen Co., pens 
The Carter's Ink Co., record ink 
H. M. Isaacs, type, ribbon & pawl 
J. H. McDonald, P. M., stamped enve 

lopes 
Library Bureau, tax collector's tab. cards 
Adams, Cushing & Foster, Tax Col- 
lector's cash book 
J. B. Wolf son, "F & E" checkwriter 
Burroughs' Adding Machine Co., services 
F. H. Blackbird, pens 
P. B. Murphy, blanks 
Wright & Potter Printing Co., tax blanks 
Whitson Sales Co., supplies 
H. M. Meserve & Co., supplies 
A. W. Babbitt, draft register 
A. W. Brownell Corp., tax tables 
H. M. Meek Pub. Co., birth books 
Hobbs and Warren, blanks 

Total expenditure 
Overd rawn 





$1800.00 


$1637.45 




5.25 




4.50 




.90 




141.37 




5 74.26 




22.25 




35.00 




s 13.00 




1.75 




7.00 




14.75 




8.08 




7.40 




7.25 




1.50 




2.56 




4.46 




$1988.73 






188.75 


$1988.73 


$1988.73 



38 



GYPSY AND BROWNTAIL MOTH 
DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 

Receipts, private work 

Pay rolls, 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 

Edward H. Berry, expenses 

Samuel Cabot, Inc., creosote 

S. T. Shattuck & Sons, express 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., hose 

James Callum, lettering 

Frost Insecticide Co., brushes 

Treat Hardware Corp., supplies 

Vreeland Chemical Co., arsenate of lead 

C. S. Buchan, brushes & paint 

John L. Morrison, rent of barn 

John L. Morrison repairing 

Freeman Abbott horse hire 

Sinclair Refining Co. 

W. H. Coleman & Co., supplies & repairing 

Fitz Henry Guptill Co., supplies 

Cornelius Callahan Co., pipe 

Buchan & McNally, supplies 

Lyle Brothers, supplies 

Joseph C. Terry, 

"The Whatnot", supplies 

The Grasselli Chemical Co., supplies 

Frank E. Dodge, cement 

C. A. Hiil, keys 

Total expenditure 
Balance 





$4000.00 




4034.05 


$5415.31 




101.77 




43.48 




75.25 




26.31 




184.88 




2.25 




10.80 




84.50 




680.00 




5.50 




120.00 




5.85 




230.00 




21.38 




; 285.98 




61.64 




11.00 




12.68 




4.30 




5.25 




.40 




204.00 




1.00 




1.05 




$7594.58 




439.47 





$8034.05 $8034.05 



39 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 

Sale of lots 

Care of lots 

Perpetual care 

Interments and use of tomb 

Foundations 

Sundries, filling, grading, etc. 

Interest on dep. 

Pay rolls 

Reade Mfg. Co., herbrocide 

Board of Public Works, water, pipe 

and use of steam roller 
E. F. Conkey, horse and team hire 
Frank E. Dodge, cement 
The Andover Press, printing and supplies 
Anderson and Bowman, sharpening tools 
Walter I. Morse, supplies 
Boston and Maine R. R., freight 
James McGhie, dynamite and fuses 
American Vault Works, markers 
George D. Millett, plants and flowers 
J. H. McDonald, postage 
Edith P. Sellars, Clerk 
Buchan and McNally, supplies 
C. F. Emerson, carting 
John F. McDonough, ashes 

Total expenditures 
Balance 





$1500.00 




1122.50 




759.50 




290.50 




321.50 




416.90 




478.65 




19.73 


$3988.77 




62.25 




70.11 




82.71 




68.30 




20.40 




12.90 




207.19 




3.73 




11.50 


. 


9.10 




51.00 




8.00 




100.00 




1.90 




1.50 




199.50 




$4898.86 




10.42 




$4909.28 


$4909.28 



40 



NEW TOMB 

Appropriation, March 7, 1921 $6000.00 

Philip L. Hardy, contractor $5264.40 

John Franklin, plans and specifications 200.00 
To Spring Grove Cem. sodding and 

grading around tomb 285 . 15 

Everett M. Lundgren, lowering device 231.50 



Total expenditures $5981 . 05 

Balance 18.95 



$6000.00 $6000.00 



41 



INSURANCE 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 
Appropriation, Workmen's Compensation 
Smart and Flagg, Agents, Insurance 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



$5204.69 


$3000.00 
2500.00 


$5204.69 
295.31 




$5500.00 


S5500.00 



HAY SCALES 


$102.00 
93.00 




Appropriation, March 7, 1921 

Receipts 

William C. Brown, weigher 

Balance 


$125.00 
70.00 




$195.00 


$195.00 



42 



INTEREST 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 
Interest received on deposits 
Paid 155 Water Bond Coupons at $20 
Paid 73 Water Bond Coupons at $17.50 
Paid 151 Sewer Bond Coupons at $20 
Paid 80 Sewer Bond Coupons at $25 
Paid 174 High School Bond Coupons 

at $20. 
Interest on Notes 13-28 

Total Expenditure 
Overdrawn 



1 


^17500.00 




626.12 


$ 3100.00 




1277.50 




3020.00 




2000.00 




3480.00 




5562.97 




18440.47 






314.35 



$18440.47 $18440.47 



WATER SINKING FUND 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 
Thomas E. Rhodes, Treas. Sink. F'ds 



$750.00 



$750.00 



$750.00 



$750.00 



SEWER SINKING FUND 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 

Thomas E. Rhodes, Treas. Sink. F'ds $1000. 00 



$1000.00 



1000.00 $1000.00 



43 



STREET LIGHTING 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 
Lawrence Gas Company 
Balance 



$6979.06 
920.94 



$7900.00 



$7900.00 $7900 : 00 



STATE TAX AND HIGHWAY TAX 



Andover's proportion of State Tax 

Andover's proportion of Highway Tax 

Special State Tax 

Bank Tax 

Street Railway Co. Tax 

Civilian War Poll Tax 

Treasurer of the Commonwealth $38119.42 



COUNTY TAX 



Andover's proportion of County Tax 

David Robinson, County Treas. $19007 . 44 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



$25900.00 
2428.50 
1221.00 
2243.13 
254.79 
6072.00 



$38119.42 $38119.42 



$19007.44 



$19007.44 $19007.44 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 
Frederic S. Boutwell, Treas. Memorial 

Hall Library $3000.00 



$3000.00 



$3000.00 



$3000.00 



44 



NOTES GIVEN 



over National Bank, Notes 13-14, 


Rate 5 . 95 


$40000.00 


" Note 15 


"5.90 


50000.00 


11 Notes 16-19, 


"5.95 


50000.00 


" Notes 20-26, 


11 5.65 


75000.00 


" Note 27 


"4.40 


5000.00 


11 Notes 28 


" 4.40 


15000.00 




$235000.00 



NOTES PAID 



Andover National Bank 
Notes 27-28 outstanding 



$215000.00 
20000.00 

$235000.00 



45 



DOG TAX 



Received from County Treasurer $323.52 

• Paid F. S. Boutwell, Treas. Memorial Hall $323.52 



MEMORIAL DAY 



POST 99, G. A. R. 



46 



$323.52 $323.52 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 $600.00 

Ballard Holt, Quartermaster $600.00 



$600.00 $600.00 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 $100.00 

Ballard Holt, Quartermaster $100. 00 



$100.00 $100.00 



RETIREMENT OF VETERANS 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 
Paid to Veteran 



$300.00 



$300.00 



$300.00 $300.00 



PUBLIC DUMP 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 
Olof Benson, Keeper 



$75.00 



$75.00 



$75.00 $75.00 



SHAWSHEEN BRIDGE LOAN 



Bond Loan 

Bond Loan Int. 

Bond Loan Premium 

William M. Wood 

Old Colony Trust Co., certification 

County of Essex, Haverhill St. Bridge 21821 .32 



Total expenditure 
Balance 





$12500.00 




31.34 




36.25 




10000.00 


$ 100.00 




i 21821.32 




21921.32 




646.27 




$22567.59 


$22567.59 



47 



WAR MEMORIAL BOOK 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 

C. M. Fuess, expenses 

Dorothy Cutler, clerical work 

Helen E. Cannon, clerical work 

Andover Post No. 8, American Legion, 

expenses 

The Andover Press, printing 

Total Expenditures 
Balance 



46, 


60 


33. 


25 


26.25 


27 


.60 


2799.40 



2933.10 
66.90 



$3000.00 



$3000.00 $3000.00 



BALLARD VALE SCHOOL HOUSE 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 
J. E. Pitman, contract 
Balance 



$1980.74 
19.26 



$2000.00 



$2000.00 



$2000.00 



TOWN FARM PROPERTY 



Sale of land and buildings 




$30000.00 


Div. And. Nat'l Bank 




335.18 


Advertising and printing 


$98.95 




B. Rogers, services 


50.00 




Revenue stamps 


15.00 




John Franklin, survey 


26.00 




Total expenditure 


189.95 




Balance 


30145.23 





$30335.18 $30335.18 



48 



REDEMPTION OF BONDS 



ppropriation, March 7, 1921 






Water 




$8000.00 


High school 




6000.00 


Sewer 




6141.78 


Sewer bond premium 




858.22 


8 Water bonds 


$8000.00 




7 Sewer bonds 


7000.00 




6 High school bonds 


6000.00 




Total 


$21000.00 


$21000.00 



49 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 
Edith P. Sellars, Clerk $1018 . 00 

Andover National Bank, safety dep. box 5 . 00 

White-Hall Garage, auto hire 6 . 00 

Scott T. Shattuck, team hire 12 . 00 

Herbert Clark, repairs 9 . 58 

E. Staples, damages 4.50 

The Andover Press, advertising 3 . 00 

John A. Riley, janitor 3.00 

New Eng. Tel. and Tel. Co. 13 . 20 

W. J. Morrissey, auto hire 51 .50 

Music, Soldiers' funerals 376.12 

Board of Selectman, expenses 12.50 
J. H. McDonald, P. M., revenue stamps 15.00 

Div. of Accounts, certif. of notes 32.00 

Town of Tewksbury, Town Bounds 26. 75 

Auto List Pub. Co., auto list 12. 00 

County of Essex, petition 3.00 

Banker and Tradesman, subscription 7.00 

American Railway Ex. Co., freight 1.57 

H. M. Meserve, supplies 9.20 

Sealer Weights and measures, fee 1 . 15 

J. H. Playdon, 10.00 

W. H. Coleman, lights 5.40 

W. S. Donald, expenses 37.70 

Guy E. Webster, auto hire 19.88 
Lilla D. Stott, probate and real estate 

returns 70.03 

C. F. Emerson, auto hire 35.00 

W. and L. E. Gurley, sealer's supplies 4.57 



$3000.00 



Amount carried forward 



50 



$1804.65 



Amount brought forward 



$1804.65 



C. W. Scott, M. D., return of births 
C. E. Abbott, M. D., return of births 
P. J. Look, M. D., return of births 
W. D. Walker, M. D., return of births 

E. D. Lane, M. D., return of births 

F. S. Smith, M. D., return of births 
J. J. Daly, M. D., return of births 

E C. Conroy, M. D., return of births 
E. M. Lundgren, return of deaths 
Pitochelli Brothers, return of deaths 
John J. Breen, return of deaths 
A. H. Libby and Co , return of deaths 
E. L. Bennett, return of deaths 
M. J. Mahoney, return of deaths 
Conlin and Ryan, return of deaths 
George A. Higgins, Clerk and 

Treasurer expenses 
William F. Gledhill, Fish Warden 
Frank H. Hardy, Supt, resetting poles 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



1 


.00 




.75 


8 


.25 


7 


.00 


7 


.50 




.25 


7 


.25 


1 


.25 


16 


.50 




.50 


1 


.50 




50 


1 


.00 


1 


.50 


1 


.25 


43 


.00 


10, 


00 


149 


.16 


2062 


.81 


937 


.19 



$3000.00 $3000.00 



51 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



The Overseers of the Poor submit the following report for the 
year ending Dec. 31, 1921: 

The Town Farm is still under the efficient supervision of Mrs. 
Annie Swanton as Superintendent and Matron and conditions 
of the house and inmates show the same careful attention as 
before. The inmates, who are all advanced in years, show a 
spirit of contentment and satisfaction. Very little help can be 
given by any of the inmates, which necessitates the hiring of 
outside help. 

There has been a marked increase in the last year in the out- 
side relief and as conditions are at present it seems almost in- 
evitable that the calls will be greater in 1922. 

The report of the special committee on the Town Farm will 
be found elsewhere. 

WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEX 

Overseers of the Poor 



52 



ALMSHOUSE EXPENSES 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 

Receipts 

Mrs. F. A. Swan ton, matron 

Jessie Fowler, labor 

Sarah Shawcross, labor 

Mrs. Baxter, labor 

Lexie Frazer, labor 

Mary Fowler, labor 

Mary Adams, labor 

Belle Valentine, labor 

Shawsheen Market, provisions 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 

Andover Coal Co., fuel 

Family Shoe Store, shoes, repairs 

Hiller and Co., dry goods 

New England Tel. and Tel. Co. 

J. H. Campion and Co., provisions 

Rockport Market, provisions 

Lindsay and Young, provisions 

C. S. Buchan, mdse. and supplies 

Lawrence Gas Co. 

H. Bruckman, grain 

Ernest T. Hethrington, groceries 

A. B. Loomer, provisions 

O. P. Chase, periodicals and supplies 

Beach Soap Co., soap and powder 

John Shea, grain 

Buchan and McNally, ware and repairing 

Frank L. Holt, labor 

John Ferguson, repairing 

A mount carried forward 





$5000.00 




470.61 


$800.00 


415. 


80 ' 


60 


.00 


5 


.40 


120 


.00 


37. 


00 


*255, 


.00 


3. 


60 


481 


.34 


25. 


53 


307, 


69 


20 


.60 


16 


.33 


8. 


38 


493. 


.74 . 


133 


.86 


361 


.75 


95 


.43 


338 


,21 


406. 


32 


138. 


,39 


199 


.13 


18 


.95 


21 


.00 


10. 


05 


21 


.40 


16 


.25 


5 


.75 



$4816.90 



53 



Amount brought forward 
Albert W. Lowe, druggist supplies 
E. E. Gray Co., provisions 
Frederick C. Small Co., provisions 
Reid and Hughes Co., dry goods 
Bicknell Brothers, clothing 
A. B. Sutherland Co., dry goods 
C. A. Hill, supplies 
Anderson and Bowman, blacksmith 

work 
John L. Morrison, stock and labor 
Frank L. Cole, clothing 
Chester D. Abbott, dairy products 
John A. Daley Co. 
Cross Coal Co., fuel 
John Ecklin, 

Armour and Co., products 
The "Whatnot," hardware 
Franklin H. Stacey, druggist supplies 
Essex County Farming Ass'n, supplies 
T. H. Lane and Son, clothing 
Miley Soap Co., washing and 

cleaning compounds 
Curtis Shoe Shop, repairing 
Shawsheen Laundry, Laundry work 
Agnes H. West, bakery 
S. K. Ames, provisions 
A. Basso, fruit 
Herbert P. Carter, wood 
Standard Oil Co., disinfectant 
C. I. Alexander Co., repairs to cleaner 
George L. Averill, supplies 
Elmer F. Conkey, shavings 
W. C. Crowley, druggist supplies 
H. R. Thombs, apples 
People's Ice Co. 



Amount carried forward $6373 . 00 

54 



$4816 


.90 


44 


.99 


91 


.23 


34, 


.79 


141 


.95 


15 


68 


8. 


.36 


6 


.50 


58 


.10 


111 


.25 


50. 


50 


22 


.05 


38 


.85 


525. 


00 


2 


.00 


6 


.75 


9. 


05 


20 


.68 


27, 


.60- 


107 


.82 


34 


.50 


4 


70 


5 


.87 


11 


,93 


9 


.25 


37. 


95 


9 


00 


4. 


00 


1. 


75 


13. 


,75 


3. 


50 


11 


.75 


10 


,00 


75. 


00 



A mount carried forward $63 73 . 00 

Henry J. Furneaux, provisions 5.86 

Board of Public Works 43 . 36 

Gray and Kendall, filing saws 2 . 50 

Total expenditure 6424 . 72 i 

Overdrawn 954.11 



$6424.72 $6424.72 



ALMSHOUSE REPAIRS 

Appropriation, March 7, 1921 $300.00 

Frank E. Dodge, whitewashing 

Gray and Kendall, labor 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 

Buchan and McNally, repairs 

C. S. Buchan, repairs 

P. F. Leslie, labor 

A. M. Colby, painting 

Balance 

$300.00 $300. 00, 



$6.40 


1 


.8a 


15 


.69 


69. 


36 


109 


.23 


6 


.88 


39 


.00 


51 


.64 



55 



SOLDIERS* RELIEF 



Appropriation March 7, 1921 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



1270.47 
229.53 



$1500.00 



$1500.00 $1500.00 



STATE AID 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



$558.00 
442 . 00 



$1000.00 



$1000.00 $1000.00 



MILITARY AID 



No appropriation 

Total expenditure 
• Overdrawn 



$150.00 



150.00 



$150.0,0 $150.00 



56 





Appropriation, March 7, 

Paid out of Almshouse 
Paid other cities and to\* 
Paid account of cities an 
Paid State 
Paid account of State 


UTSIDE RELU 

1921 

rns 

d towns 

$318.40 
207.17 


EF 

$2693.17 
772.40 
207.17 
379.71 
318.40 


$4000.00 


Total expenditure 
Due from State 
Due from cities 


$4370.85 

525.57 




Net expenditure 
Balance 






3845 . 28 
154.72 






$4000.00 


$4000.00 



AIDING MOTHERS WITH DEPENDENT CHILDREN 

Appropriation, March 7, 1921 $2500.00 



Town cases 




$2925.55 


Paid other cities 




838.35 


Paid account other towns 




894.00 




$4657.90 


Due from towns 


$323.00 




Due from State 


873.16 




Received from State 


377.65 




Received from towns 


261.67 


1835.48 


Net expenditure 




$2822.42 


Overdrawn 







$322.42 



$2822.42 $2822.42 



57 



CASH REPORT 



Received for board from Lucy Donahue $ 28 . 00 

Received for board from Joan Dorrington 87 . 50 

Received for board from H. F. Swan ton 112.50 

Received for pork and pigs 83 . 36 

for hay 150.00 

for poultry 5 . 25 

for old lumber 4 . 00 

$470.61 
Paid Town Treasurer 



$470.61 



STATISTICS OF ANDOVER TOWN FARM 



Number of inmates January 1, 1921 
Number admitted during year 
Number sent to Danvers 
Number sent to Tewksbury 
Number of deaths 
Number who left for work 
Number of inmates January 1, 1922 
Number between 60 and 70 years of age 
Number between 70 and 80 years of age 
Number between 80 and 90 years of age 



10 

7 
1 
3 
1 
3 
9 
5 
1 
3 



58 



PERSONAL PROPERTY AT ALMSHOUSE 



House Furniture 

Clothing 

Provisions 

Farm Stock 

Farm Produce 

Fuel 

Farm tools 



$1100.00 


300. 


00 


100 


00 


320. 


00 


285. 


00 


275, 


.00 


325, 


00 


$2705.00 



59 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



We herewith submit our annual report: — 

Number of males assessed 2400 

Personal estate $2309395 . 00 

Real estate 8638975.00 

$10948370.00 

Poll tax 10120.00 

Tax on personal estate 61200.85 

Tax on real estate 228934. 73 

$300255.58 

Rate of taxation per $1000, $26.50 

Number of 

Horses assessed 440 

Cows assessed 891 

Neat cattle assessed 246 

Swine assessed 128 

Fowls assessed 12625 

Dwellings assessed 1845 

Acres of land assessed 17786 

WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Assessors of Andover 



60 



REPORT OF TREE WARDEN 



This has been a year in the Tree Department never to be for- 
gotten, and, we trust, never to be repeated. 

The ice storm of Nov. 27th, 28th, and 29th wrought such 
havoc with our trees that it is beyond the pen of man to describe 
it. Only those seeing could believe the amount of damage done. 

We have had a large force of men working continuously since 
the storm trying to save every tree possible, but it will take years, 
and a large amount of money to bring the shade trees back to 
where they were before. 

Property owners must not be hasty in condemning their shade 
trees to the wood pile as the right kind of pruning and a little 
patience, when your trees look badly now will come out O. K. 
later. 

What we must do is to get together, have a real Arbor Day 
and plant more trees. 

This department has planted one hundred shade trees the past 
year (mostly Norway Maples) and has taken down nearly as 
many, therefore we must plant in order to preserve our beautiful 
shade trees for the coming generations. 

We have done twelve miles of roadside cutting. This is a 
start, but we have many miles to do so as to make the roads 
safe for travel. 

In order to carry on the work of this department I ask that 
the sum of $10,000.00 be appropriated; $5,000.00 to cover 
amount spent since the storm and $5,000,00 to be used later. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD H. BERRY 

Tree Warden 



61 



REPORT OF TREE WARDEN 



Appropriation, March 7, 1921 

Pay rolls 

Walter I. Morse, supplies 

Frank W. Spinney, mapje trees 

Owen Sullivan, labor 

John L. Morrison, blacksmith work 

Gray & Kendall, filing saws 

Pay rolls, ice storm 

Sidney P. White, labor, ice storm 

H. A. Prescott, supplies, ice storm 

F. H. Hardy, Supt., ice storm 

Walter I. Morse, supplies, ice storm 

Treat Hardware*Corp., supplies, ice storm 

Frost Insecticide Co., supplies, ice storm 

Samuel Cabot, Inc., supplies, ice storm 

John F. McDonough, team hire & 

labor, ice storm 
E. H. Berry, expenses, ice storm 
S. T. Shattuck & Son, ice storm 
American Railway Ex. Co., ice storm 

Total expenditure 
Overdrawn 



$3000.00 



J3022 


.48 


24 


.11 


121 


.00 


30 


.00 


24 


.90 


2 


.20 


2239 


.52 


74.31 


57. 


.00 


77 


.44 


47 


.89 


47, 


15 


128, 


45 


17. 


85 


842. 


60 


13, 


42 


10. 


50 




53 



781.35 



3781.35 



$6781.35 $6781.35 



62 



REPORT OF MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 



In submitting my report for the year 1921, I wish to thank 
the property owners for their co-operation in suppressing the 
brown-tail moth. The infestation has been especially heavy 
in the south and west parts of the town and if we are to stamp 
out this pest we must not let up. 

We are very glad to have property owners do their ov\n work 
but the property must be inspected by your Moth Sapt. or bis 
deputies. With your co-operation we mean to have a clean 
slate this year. 

We have at the present time, three power sprayers and two 
hand pumps. The sprayers are old and will soon have to be 
replaced, but by overhauling and getting some new parts we 
may get by for a year or two, but your Supt. thinks it will be a 
good business policy to buy one small power sprayer this year; 
therefore I would ask the town to appropriate the sum of $6,000.00 
for this department. 

Respectfully, 

EDWARD H. BERRY 

* Tree Warden 



63 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



REPORT OF CHIEF 

To the Board of Selectmen. 

Gentlemen: — 

I herewith submit the report of the Police Department for the 
year ending Dec. 31, 1921. 

Whole number of arrests 143. Males 133. Females 10. 

Offenses For Which Arrests Were Made 



Manslaughter 


4 


Violation Motor Vehicle Law 


34 


Drunk 


14 

3 

13 


Assault 

Malicious Mischief 


Vagrancy 


5 


Insane 


4 


Breaking and entering 


8 


Disturbance 


8 


Town Ordinance 


10 


Violation of Liquor Law 


13 


Attempt to Break 


1 


Disorderly House 


1 


Lewdness 


4 


Fishing without license 


2 


Violation Bd. Health Law 


5 


Evading Fares on electric car 


5 


Operating motor vehicle while under the influence of liquor 4 


Indecent assault 


4 



64 



Setting forest fire 1 

Peddling without license 1 

Cruelty to animals 1 

Larceny 3 

DISPOSITION OF CASES 

On Probation 16 

Suspended sentences to House of Correction 2 

Suspended sentences to State Farm 1 

Returned to Tewksbury Infirmary 4 

Committed to House of Correction 6 

Continued for sentence 2 

Held for Grand Jury 4 

Paid fines in lower court 51 

Arrested for out of- town officers 3 

Committed to Danvers State Hospital 4 

SUPERIOR COURT FINDINGS 

No bill found 1 

Cases pending 5 

On probation 2 

Paid fines 6 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Fines paid in lower court $2085 . 00 

Fines paid in Superior court 515.00 

Value of property reported stolen 1200.00' 

Value of property recovered 250.00^ 

Value of property Police equipment 500. 00 1 

Dead bodies cared for 6 

Doors left open and secured 86^ 

I wish to express my sincere thanks, "in this public manner** 
to the Board of Selectmen and to Colver J. Stone, Trial Justice, 
for the many acts of kindness they have extended the Police Dept. 
The work of the Dept. for the past year has been hard. The Vol- 
stead act in regard to prohibition has added greatly to it. Raids 

65 



have been made in many parts of the town with good results and 
fines amounting to $1,285.00 have been collected in court. The 
handling of the Auto Traffic is one thing that takes up much time 
and more officers should be added to the present force. I would 
recommend the purchase of a small truck as many times it could 
be used in taking injured persons to the hospital on a stretcher 
instead of in an auto. 

We have had four fatal accidents on Main street during the 
year 1921 and we have taken sixteen to the Lawrence Hospital 
for treatment. 

FRANK M. SMITH 

Chief of Police 



66 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



The trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery submit the following 
report : — - 

The appropriation calling for $6,000 for the reconstruction of 
the tomb has been spent for the same, which includes grading, 
and all outside work attendant thereto. Your trustees are in 
every way satisfied with the work done, and feel that along with 
other Andover lines of progress that this is a credit to the Ceme- 
tery and Town. It gives us about twice as much room and in a 
more convenient and workable manner. Very little new work has 
been done during the year, and what was done was taken out of 
the regular income. 

The cemetery has been kept up in the same high and efficient 
manner as in the past. A new lowering device has been purchased 
by your trustees and is now owned by the cemetery. 

Your trustees ask for the same appropriation of $1500 with all 
incomes from the cemetery for carrying on the work of the coming 
year. We also ask $1,000 for a continuation of the new work on 
the East side. 

GEORGE D. MILLET WARREN L. JOHNSON 
WALTER L. MORSE JOHN W. STARK 
DANIEL H. POOR FRED E. CHEEVER 

DAVID R. LAWSON 

Warren L. Johnson, clerk of Board of Trustees. 



67 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT 

To the Board of Trustees: 

I herewith submit my annual report as Superintendent of 
Spring Grove Cemetery for the year ending December 31, 1921. 

In addition to the regular care of the Cemetery we have 
spent about $1000. in general improvement of the east side, the 
clearing of rough land and the grading of roads. 

We are also glad to report the completion of a new tomb and 
the grading of the land around it. The work on the tomb was 
finished so late in the season that we were unable to fully complete 
the grading, which, however, will be attended to as soon as pos- 
sible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. A. SWANTON, 



STATISTICS OF SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 

Lots sold as per last report 522 

Lots sold in 1921 20 



Total number of lots sold 542 

Total number of single graves sold 195 

Interments as per last report 1535 

Interments in 1921 52 



Total number of interments 1587 



68 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S REPORT 



To the Board of Selectmen: — 

Gentlemen: — I hereby submit my report for the year begin- 
ning November 15, 1920, and ending November 15, 1921. 

Number of cattle inspected 139 

Number of stables inspected 159 
Number of cows condemned because afflicted with 

tuberculosis 25 

Number of stables disinfected 22 
Number of interstate cattle identified and released from 

quarantine ' 50 
Number of dogs placed in quarantine and held for ob- 
servation after they had bitten persons 4 

The head of one dog was sent to the office of the "Division of 
Animal Industry" for a laboratory examination, with negative 
results. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES H. NEWTON 

Inspector of Animals 



69 



REPORT OF BUILDING INSPECTOR 



To the Board of Selectmen: — ■ 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit my report of the Building 
Inspector's Department from December 31, 1920 to December 
31, 1921. 

Whole number of permits granted 192 

Number of addition permits granted 28 

Number of alteration permits granted 10 

Number of new building permits granted 108 

One family dwelling houses 61 

Two family dwelling houses 3 

All sizes of garages permits granted 29 

Railroad station 1 

Restaurant 1 

Power house 1 

Barns 11 

Elevators 3 

Miscellaneous buildings 11 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH I. PITMAN 

Building Inspector 



70 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY 



Town House and fixtures 

Engine House, storehouse and barn 

25723 feet land 

Memorial Hall 
22318 feet land 

Engine House, Ballardvale 
New shed 
1-3 acre land 

9 acres land, Burnham road 

Punchard High School buildings 
4 acres land 

John Dove Schoolhouse 

Heating plant, Jackson Schoolhouse 

Stowe Schoolhouse 

3 3-4 acres land 

Bradlee Schoolhouse, Ballardvale 
1 acre land 

Richardson Schoolhouse 
1-2 acre land 

Indian Ridge Schoolhouse 
1 acre land 



Amount brought forward 



$ 50000.00 




25000.00 




25000.00 






$100000.00 




30000.00 




12000.00 






42000.00 


6000.00 


200.00 




300.00 






6500.00 


1800.00 




1800.00 


125000.00 


8000.00 






133000.00 


25000.00 


30000.00 




31000.00 




6000.00 






92000.00 


23000.00 


500.00 






23500.00 


7000.00 


400.00 






7400.00 


17000.00 


800.00 






17800.00 






$424000.00 



71 



Amount brought forward 




$424000.00 


West Centre Schoolhouse 


5000.00 




1-2 acre land 


150.00 


5150.00 






North District Schoolhouse 


5000.00 




1-2 acre land 


50.00 


5050.00 


Bailey District Schoolhouse 


3000.00 


1-2 acre land 


50.00 


3050.00 


Osgood District Schoolhouse 


2000.00 


1-2 acre land 


50.00 


2050.00 






Old Schoolhouse, Ballard vale 


4000.00 




1-4 acre land 


500.00 


4500.00 


9 acres land, Indian Ridge (gravel pit) 


3000.00 


4 1-2 acres land, Carmel Woods Res- 






ervation 


5000.00 




173751 feet land, Central Park (Rich- 






ardson Field) 


15000.00 




Band Stand 


1000.00 




6 1-2 acres land, Playstead 


5000.00 




20 1-2 acres land, Playstead, Ballard vale 


500.00 




41 1-2 acres land, Spring Grove Cemetery 


9000.00 




Receiving tomb, and toolhouse 


6000.00 


44500.00 


Andover Board of Public Works — 




Pipe lines and fountains 


258000.00 




Pumping station and buildings 


42500.00 




Coal shed 


700.00 




3 acres land 


800.00 




Two reservoirs 


16000.00 




4 1-2 acres land 


2350.00 




28 acres land, Boston Ice Co., Hag- 






getts Pond 


2500.00 


$322850.00 


Amount carried forward 


$811150.00 



72 






Amount brought forward 




$811150. 


00 


Workshop, Lewis street 


1600.00 






Old Stable, Lewis street 


1000.00 






Barn and shed, Lewis street 


3000.00 






47467 feet land, Lewis street 


3000.00 






House, Engineer's house 


2500.00 






Pump house, east side of No. Main 








street 


5000.00 






Steam road roller 


4500.00 






3 sleds 


75.00 






1 auto 


300.00 






3 horses 


800.00 






Carts and harnesses 


200.00 






Sewer System (30 acres Filter Beds) 


313000.00 










334975 
76854 


.00 

.28 


unchard School Fund 




temorial Hall, Permanent Fund 


45000.00 







Memorial Hall Library, John Cornell 
Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, John Byers 
Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, Edward Tay- 
lor Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, Isaac E. 
Giddings Fund 

Memorial Hall Library and furniture 

Memorial Hall Library, Woman's 
Christian Temperance Union 

Memorial Hall Library, Phillips Fund 

Personal Property at Town Farm 
Motor Combination Chemical Truck 
Motor Combination Pump and Truck 
Light Truck 
Hook and Ladder 
Two hose wagons 

A mount carried forward 



7700.00 



10000.00 



500.00 



3000.00 




10000.00 




100.00 




3200.00 






79500.00 




2705.00 




5300.00 




9000.00 




800.00 




1000.00 




1000.00 


19805.00 




$1322284.28 



73 



Amount brought forward 

Hose sled 

Four horses 

Hay scales 

Safes in Town House 


60.00 
800.00 
350.00 
800.00 


$1322284.28 

2010.00 

10850.00 
5000.00 


Weights and measures 
Fire alarm apparatus 
4000 feet hose 


350.00 
8000.00 
2500.00 


Moth Dept. Sprayers and Tools 


5000.00 




$1340144.28 



74 



TOWN OF ANDOVER — JURY LIST 



Abbott, Newton S. 
Averill, George L. 
Angus, John C. 
Bailey, Samuel H. 
Bancroft, William A. 
Baxter, George H. 
Barrett, Patrick J. 
Bassett, Arthur W. 
Burns, David F. 
Cates, A. Lincoln 
Cannon, Gordon R. 
Carter, George M. 
Carter, Donald W. 
Clark, Herbert 
Chase, Herbert F. 
Cheever, Fred E. 
Cole, Roscoe K. 
Cole, Joseph F. 
Comeau, Arthur N. 
Cutler, Howard A. 
Dane, Louis A. 
Disbrow, George W. 
Dove, Percival 
Doyle, Thomas J. 
Dunnells, George C. 
Flaherty, Michael J. 
Flanders, Charles W. 
Flint, Edwin M. 
Garland, George M. 
Godin, John W. 
Greenwood, Milton 
Hannon, Patrick J. 



Hannon, Lawrence J. 
Harrington, Daniel F. 
Hill, Ira B. 
Holt, George A. 
Holt, John V. 
Holland, Alfred C. 
Holt, George E. 
Hovey, James H. 
Keane, Mark M. 
Kendall, Frank H. E. 
Kyle, James 
Leslie, David C. 
Lockhead, Robert 
Maddox, John 
Mahoney, Timothy J. 
May, George M. 
McGovern, Clarence F. 
Mclntyre, William D. 
Miller, George R. 
Mosher, James R. 
Mooar, J. Warren 
Nason, Harry C. 
Newton, Charles M. 
Nolan, Joseph P. 
Noyes, John L. 
O'Connell, Walter J. 
O'Donnell, Hugh F. 
O'Donnell, John A. 
O'Hara, Robert W. 
Pitman, Joseph I. 
Remmes, Joseph T. 
Riley, John A. 



75 



Riley, Joseph A. Taylor, Loren E. 

Robinson, William C. Todd, Henry 

Roggemann, Edward Trow, Henry J. 
Scott, David M. # Tuttle, Benjamin B. 

Shattuck, Scott T. Valpey, Frank D. 

Shaw, George Valentine, Franklin S. 

Shaw, Irving R. Walker, Salmond C. 

Sherry, Frank J. Whitman, David O. 

Stott, Joseph E. Ward, George D. 






76 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR 



To the Board of Assessors: — 

The following is the Report of the Collector of Taxes for the 
year ending December 31, 1921. 



1918 



Amount as per warrant 




$810.-09 


Moth Work 




5.10 


Interest 




119.59 


Collected Taxes 


$750.18 




Moth Work 


5.10 




Interest 


119.59 




Abated 


59.91 





$934.78 



$934.78 



1919 



Amount as per warrant 




$8916.38 


Added to warrant 




. 4.60 


Moth Work 




41.30 


Interest 




797.88 


Collected Taxes 


$8095.99 




Collected Moth Work 


41.30 




Interest 


797.88 




Abated 


446.71 




Uncollected 


378.28 





$9760.16 



$9760.16 



77 



1920 



Amount as per warrant 
Added to warrant 
Moth Work 
Interest 

Collected Taxes 
Collected moth work 
Collected Interest 
Abated 
Uncollected 



Amount as per warrant 
Added to warrant 
Moth Work 
Interest 

Collected Taxes 
Collected moth work 
Collected Interest 
Abated 
Uncollected 



1921 



$33057.82 

7.91 

223.50 

924.63 



$22334.63 




223.50 




924.63 




109.04 




10622.06 




$34213.86 


$34213.86 




$300255.58 




132.20 




3764.15 




141.97 


$255264.08 




3764.15 


« 


141.97 




3777.79 




41345.91 




$304293.90 


$304293.90 



SUMMARY COLLECTOR'S CASH ACCOUNT, 1921 

Amount Collected and Paid to Town Treasurer 



Taxes 



Moth Work 



Interest 



Total 



1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
Interest on Dep. 



$ 750.18 

8095.99 

22334.63 

255264.08 



; 5.10 

41.30 

223.50 

3764.15 



119.59 

797.88 
924.63 
141.97 
234.03 



i 874.87 

8935.17 

23482.76 

259170.20 

234.03 



$286444.88 



$4034.05 



$2218.10 



$292697.03 



78 



CORNELL FUND 



Amount of Fund 
Deposited in Savings Banks 




$5000.00 
5000.00 


Income 






Balance from last account 
Savings Bank interst 


$ 97.77 
245.00 


$342.77 






Expenditures 






Expended for coal and wood 
Balance on hand 


$290.76 
52.01 


$342.77 



JOHN C. ANGUS 
CHARLES N. MARLAND 
W. D. WALKER 

Trustees 



79 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Liabilities 

Water Bonds, 4% (15000 due 1922) $72000.00 

Water Bonds, 3^% (3000 due 1922) 35000. 00 

Sewer Bonds, 4% (5000 due-1922) 75000. 00 

Sewer Bonds, 5% (2000 due 1922) 38000.00 

High School Loan, 4% (6000 due 1922) 81000.00 
Shawsheen Bridge Loan, 4^% 

(2500 due 1922) 12500.00 

Lowell St. Sewer Note 5000. 00 

Temporary Loan Note 15000 . 00 



S333500.00 



Assets 

Cash, General Fund $20526 . 48 

Cash, Town Farm Sale 30145 . 23 

Soldiers' Memorial Committee 2000.00 

Cash, Water Loan 2707 . 38 

Cash, Sewer Loans 2533.81 

Cash, Town Farm Committee 300.00 

War Memorial Book 66 . 90 

Uncollected taxes 52346.25 

Moth work 797.40 

Commonwealth, State Aid 558 . 00 

Commonwealth, Military Aid 150 . 00 

Commonwealth, Temporary Aid 318.40 

Amount carried forward 

80 



58279.80 



53143.65 



1026.40 



$112449.85 



A mount brought forward $11 2449 . 85 

Cities and towns, Temporary Aid 207. 17 

Cities and Towns, Mothers' Aid 323 . 00 

Commonwealth, Mothers' Aid 873.16 

Sewer Assessments 3795 . 52 

Unpaid Water Rates of January 1st 7189.82 

Sinking Funds 56375 . 28 

69790.35 



Balance against Town 152286 . 20 



$333500.00 



81 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 



Dr. 

Balance Jan. 1, 1921, General Fund 
Balance Jan. 1, 1921, Water Loan 
Balance Jan. 1, 1921, Sewer Loan 
Balance Jan. 1, 1921, Sewer Premium 
Balance Jan. 1, 1921, War Memorial Book 
Balance Jan. 1, 1921, Refund 
Commonwealth, Corporation Tax 
Commonwealth, Bank Tax 
Commonwealth, Income Tax, 1918 
Commonwealth, Income Tax, 1919 
Commonwealth, Income Tax, 1920 
Commonwealth, Income Tax, 1921 
Commonwealth, Soldiers' Exemption 
Commonwealth, General School Fund 
Commonwealth, Civilian War Tax 
Commonwealth, Street Railway Tax 
Commonwealth, Reimbursement Taxes 
Commonwealth, School Tuition 
Commonwealth, State Aid 
Commonwealth, Industrial Schools 
Commonwealth, Mothers' Aid 
Commonwealth, Temporary Aid 
Commonwealth, Public Works, Moth Work 
Commonwealth, Hawker's Licenses 
Commonwealth, Public Works, Lowell Street. 
Essex County, Lowell Street 
Essex County, Dog Tax 
Andover National Bank, Notes 
Collector's Department, Taxes 
Collector's Department, Interest on Taxes 
Collector's Department, Moth Work 
Collector's Department, Interest on Deposits 
Board of Public Works, Water Rates 

Amount carried forward 



$22119. 


06 


5026. 


59 


587. 


59 


858. 


22 


3000. 


00 


1. 


05 


22306. 


31 


10562. 


43 


200. 


00 


555. 


00 


2775. 


00 


20374.90 


50.48 


7978. 


91 


66, 


00 


552. 


64 


166 


,18 


175. 


50 


648 


,00 


139 


.04 


1263 


,07 


287 


.16 


110 


.10 


56 


.00 


9958 


.46 


9958 


.46 


323 


.52 


235000 


.00 


286444 


.88 


1984 


.07 


4034 


.05 


234 


.03 


28013 


.36 


$675810.06 



82 



account with the town of Andover 



Cr. 

Orders paid 
Schools 

Highway Department 
Lowell Street 
Park Department 
Water Department 
Street Lighting 
Police Department 
Fire Department 
Brush Fires 

Printing and Stationery- 
Insurance 
Miscellaneous 
Town House 
Town' Officers 
Spring Grove Cemetery 
Board of Health 
Moth Work 
Tree Warden 
Public Dump 
Hay Scales 

Interest on Notes and Bonds 
Memorial Day 
G. A. R. Appropriation 
Memorial Hall Library 
Memorial Hall Library, Dog Tax 
Town Farm Expenses 
Town Farm Repairs 
Town Farm Sale 
Outside Relief 
Soldiers' Relief 
State Aid 
Military Aid 

Amount carried forward 



$101288.60 

59572.97 

29875.39 

1213.74 

31638.20 

6979.06 

9681.29 

24525.06 

643.77 

1988.73 

5204.69 

2062.81 

2861.34 

8648. 19 

10879.91 

3356.45 

7594.58 

6781.35 

75.00 

102.00 

18440.47 

600.00 

100.00 

3000.00 

323.52 

6424.72 

248.36 

189.95 

4370.85 

1270.47 

558.00 

150.00 



$350649.47 



83 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 



Dr. 

Amount brought forward 
Board of Public Works, Service Pipe 
Board of Public Works, Highway Department 
Board of Public Works, Sidewalk Assessment 
W. C. Crowley, Sealer's Fees 
George A. Higgins, Town Clerk's Fees 
Old Schoolhouse, Ballard Vale, Rents 
Trial Justice Court, Fines 
Town Farm 

Spring Grove Cemetery, Sale and Care of Lots 
Town House, Rents 

School Department, Tuition and Supplies 
Hay Scales 

Cities and Towns, Mothers' Aid 
Fire Department, Use of Horses 
Sewer Department, Assessments 
Sewer Department, Interest on Assessments 
Sewer Department, House Connections 
Auto Dealers License 
Board of Health, Garbage Licenses 
Board of Health, Alcohol Licenses 
Board of Health, Manicurist License 
Board of Health, Milk Licenses 
Phillips Academy, Street Lighting 
Druggist's Licenses 

Smart and Flagg Agents, Insurance Rebate 
Shawsheen Bridge Loan 

Shawsheen Bridge Loan, Premium and Interest 
Shawsheen Bridge Loan, William M. Wood 
Andover National Bank, Interest on Deposits 
Town Farm Sale 

Town Farm Sale, Interest on Deposit 
Brush Fire Department 

Total Receipts 



$675810.06 


9568. 


51 


2836. 


90 


1791. 


18 


81. 


26 


198 


00 


225 


00 


1869 


50 


470.61 


3409 


28 


802 


70 


419 


50 


70 


00 


1546 


99 


1643 


25 


64 


00 


17 


50 


818 


28 


14 


00 


4 


00 


6 


00 


6 


00 


11 


50 


230 


00 


2 


00 


76 


34 


12500 


00 


67 


.59 


10000 


00 


626 


12 


30000.00 


335 


.18 


6 


00 


$755527.25 



84 



account with the town of Andover 



Cr. 

Amount brought forward 
Mothers' Aid 
Retirement of Veterans 
Redemption of 8 Water Bonds 
Redemption of 7 Sewer Bonds 
Redemption of 6 High School Bonds 
Water Sinking Funds 
Sewer Sinking Funds 
War Memorial Book 
Shawsheen Bridge 
Old Schoolhouse, Ballard Vale 
Sewer Department, Maintenance 
Sewer Department, Construction 
Sewer Department, House Connection 
Sewer Department, Special Survey 
County Tax 

Commonwealth State Tax 
Commonwealth Bank Tax 
Commonwealth Highway Tax 
Commonwealth, Special State Tax 
Commonwealth, Street Railway Tax 
Commonwealth, War Poll Tax 
Andover National Bank Notes 

Total expenditures 

Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1922 
General Fund 
Town Farm Sale 
Water Loan 
Sewer Loan 
War Memorial Book 
Town Farm Committee 
Soldiers' Memorial Committee 



85 



$350649.47 

4657.90 

300.00 

8000.00 

7000.00 

6000.00 

750.00 

1000.00 

2933.10 

21921.32 

1980.74 

2996.45 

14957 . 53 

1124.08 

850.00 

19007.44 

25900.00 

2243.13 

2428.50 

1221.00 

254.79 

6072.00 

215000.00 



$697247.45 


20526 


,48 


30145. 


.23 


2707.38 


2533. 


.81 


66. 


90 


300. 


00 


2000.00 



$755527.25 



Richardson Fund — Shawsheen Village School 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1921 $1384. 18 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 70.05 



Cr. 
Tremont Talking Machine Co. $6 . 90 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 1447 . 33 



Draper Fund — School 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1921 $1067.73 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 54.02 



Edward Taylor Fund — Fuel 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1921 S 287.08 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 14.52 



Cr. 
Deposit, Andover Savings Bank $ 301.60 



Varnum Lincoln Spelling Fund 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1921 $ 537.23 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 26. 17 



Cr. 
H. C. Sanborn, Supt. of Schools $ 20. 00 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 543.40 



1454.23 



S1454.23 







$1121.75 


Cr. 






J. H. Playdon 


S 23 . 00 




Natural History Society 


15.00 




Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 


1083.75 


$1121.75 



$ 301.60 



S 301.60 



$ 563.40 



S 563.40 



86 



Isaac Giddings Burial Ground Fund 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1921 $1000.00 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 50.62 



Cr. 
F. H. Foster, Treas., South Cemetery $ 50.62 
Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 1000.00 



Cemetery Fund 




Perpetual Care 




Dr. 




Balance, January 1, 1921 $24686.64 


Andover Savings Bank, interest 


1294.08 


Deposits for Perpetual Care 


2709.25 


Andover National Bank Stock 


200.00 


Andover National Bank Dividends 


16.00 


Cash 


76.00 



Cr. 



Spring Grove Cemetery, for care of lots $ 290.50 
Private Cemeteries, for care of lots 687 . 60 

Deposits, Andover Savings Bank 28003 . 87 



$1050.62 



$1050.62 



— $28981.97 



$28981.97 



87 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Selectmen of the Town of Andover. 

Gentlemen: — I submit the following report of the Andover 
Fire Department from December 31, 1920 to December 31, 1921. 

During this time the Department has answered 103 bell alarms, 
30 still alarms. We have laid 6400 feet iy 2 inch hose, 1540 feet 
% inch hose using 950 gallons chemical, 400 feet of ladders. 

Value of buildings and contents where fires have occurred, 
$121,200. 

Loss on buildings and contents, $10,300. 

The Department consists of One Combination Chemical and 
Hose Truck, One Combination Pump and Hose Truck, One 
brush fire truck, One Two horse Ladder Truck, One two horse 
Hose Wagon, Four Horses, 4 sets of Harness, 2 Tip Carts, 2 
Sleds, and 4100 2J^ in. Hose in good condition. The Fire Alarm 
System is in good condition as we have replaced about ten miles 
of old wire on account of the damage caused by the sleet storm. 

The earnings of the horses and drivers for the year are $1600. 

We recommend the sum of $23,000.00 for the use of the Fire 
Department. 

We also recommend the purchase of an auto Ladder Truck. 

CHARLES F. EMERSON, 

Chief Engineer. 



88 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Since the introduction of a town water supply and system of 
sewers the problem of sanitation has fundamentally changed, not 
on account of these innovations alone, but the fact that many 
problems in civic and individual care of the health have undergone 
a species of reformation. The community now recognizes that 
personal security from, and the care of disease conditions, is the 
basis of general health conditions. Education of the public 
through the medium of the press, school supervision, district and 
public health nurses, and the physician himself, are among the 
many useful sources. Not only is the source of disease looked for, 
but particularly the route through which it is conveyed to others. 
Much of the work done has consisted in clearing away the fal- 
lacies built up by tradition, but constructive work has gone on 
also, and we now are able to formulate the results that deal with 
the individual as well as with environment. The ultimate 
eradication of Typhoid Fever, Diphtheria, Tuberculosis and all 
other transmissible diseases we now know depend upon the 
eradication of the source and prevention of a route of communi- 
cation. We are now sure that the sources of these diseases are as 
well defined as are the seeds from which spring the various forms 
in the animal and vegetable kingdom. The Board of Health 
therefore, is not worried by theoretical possibilities, but concerns 
itself with practical probabilities. These principles are the basis 
for official public health activities, the search for and the super- 
vision of infected persons, or animals in the case of bovine 
tuberculosis for instance; the control of infected discharges and 
their exclusion from the mouth, breathing apparatus, food and 
drink. The search for and supervision of mild, early conval- 
escing, unrecognized and concealed cases and carriers, as well as 
of acute cases, is necessarily an essential factor in the work of 
the Board of Health. 

The State, in view of its Constitution, is concerned with man's 
surroundings and relationships. It must plan for and consider 

89 



his comfort and happiness as well as his health. This must be 
done co-operatively, as well as economically and authorita- 
tively in order to secure for the individual every possible ad- 
vantage. The secret of successful organization is the parcelling 
out along material lines of all the different activities which are to 
be co-ordinated to one great end. The work of the Board of 
Health then, has become not only the work of sanitary inspection, 
but also of educational supervision. 

Suggestions for removal of the cause of disease must go hand 
in hand with suggestions for treatment in the same method as 
carried out in medical practice. It is not enough that Boards of 
Health promulgate rules and regulations for the carrying out of 
the above outlined scheme, it should be at all times equipped 
with the facilities for its work, and have the hearty co-operation 
of the public. Knowledge, authority, equipment and availa- 
bility are the essentials, and each should be given due consideration. 

The problem of the general health of the community is always 
with us, and upon it depends in a great measure the civic activi- 
ties of pleasure, safety and convenience. Our Town should inter- 
est itself in the conservation of its health as it does in the con- 
servation of property and financial problems, unfortunately 
property has always had precedence over persons in almost 
every relation. We protect ourselves against accident so far as 
we are able, we should all the more protect ourselves against 
disease, for it may be both an accident as well as a disease. 

In Andover we have done much to protect the public against 
disease through the work of School Medical Supervision. School 
nurses, district and health nurses, and the Board of Health un- 
qualifiedly recommends the continuance of all these activities. 
We call attention to the various reports in this volume as evidence 
of the work already done, with the assurance that more and 
better work will be done as we learn from personal experience 
the varied needs of our community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. ABBOTT. M. D. 
FRANKLIN H. STACEY 
BANCROFT T. HAYNES 

Board of Health 
90 



MILK INSPECTOR'S REPORT 



To the Board of Health. 
Gentlemen :• — 

During the past year I examined 19 samples of milk and 
visited 39 barns where cows were kept. Believing sanitary in- 
spection of dairies more important than taking and testing sam- 
ples of milk I have given that part of the work the most attention. 

The agent of the Board of Health reported several cases of 
Scarlet Fever on the premises of one producer. I stopped the 
sale of milk which was sold in Lowell, notified the Inspector of 
that city and made a return visit to meet him and the Health 
Officer. 

Also visited one farm in North Andover to see if by any chance 
any of our Scarlet Fever cases could be traced, but found every- 
thing all right. 

During the year there were 19 licenses issued for the sale of 
milk, cream and oleomargerine. Samples of milk tested from 
3.35 to 7% butter fats. 

At my request the State Department of Health detailed one of 
their inspectors to instruct me as to the proper method of scoring 
the dairies, several were visited and scored by the standard 
system in use. Notices were sent to these dairies giving the 
score and recommendations made. 

In view of the field work now required in addition to the regular 
work, I feel that I should not give the time to this position and 
have tendered my resignation. Have held over on this work 
since it came under the Board of Health until a> successor should 
be appointed, but there have been no applicants for the position. 
It is necessary to qualify by examination given by the Mass. 
Agricultural College, and for some part of the work one must be 
a recognized chemist. 

Respectfully submitted, 
FRANKLIN H. STACEY, Pharm. D., Ph.C. 
91 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH NURSE, 
AGENT AND CLERK 



To the Board of Health. 

I hereby submit my second annual report: 

Number of contagious diseases reported for the year was 473, 
compared with 302 for 1920. 





1921 


1920 


Influenza 




171 


Tuberculosis 


10 


18 


Encephalitis Lethargica 
Anterior Poliomyelitis 
Typhoid Fever 
Scarlet Fever 


3 

6 

36 


1 
6 

2 
8 


Diphtheria 
Chicken Pox 


21 

25 


15 
20 


Whooping Cough 
Measles 


2 
358 


17 
31 


Mumps 

Suppurative Conjunctivitis 

Lobar Pneumonia 


5 
1 
4 


13. 


Tetanus 


2 




Deaths from Contagious^ 


^Diseases 




Tuberculosis 




6 


Typhoid Fever 
Tetanus 




1 

2 


Measles 




1 


Lobar Pneumonia 




2 


Scarlet Fever 




1 



13 
92 



Reports of several dog bites were received but the dogs did not 
have Rabies so the Pasteur treatment was not required. 

During the year, I made 1241 sick calls, also miscellaneous 
calls as follows : 

Accident and Emergency 11 

Erysipelas 8 

Raynaud's Disease 1 

Carcinoma 4 

Diphtheria Culture for Diagnosis 38 

Diphtheria Cultures for release 20 

Dressings 42 

I made 335 child welfare and prenatal calls. There were 178 
births, and 17 deaths under one year of age. 

In addition to other work I made 227 Sanitary visits. There 
were 70 complaints made to the Board of Health about unsani- 
tary conditions. 

Diphtheria, Scarlet Fever, and Measles occurred in epidemic 
form. The Diphtheria was mostly nasal which is especially 
difficult to control owing to its similarity to a bad catarrhal 
head cold, and is treated as such by parents who fail to call a 
physician before others are infected. 

It seems that the epidemic of Scarlet Fever was due to its 
being so mild that the patient having it did not seek medical 
advice before the infection was spread. It is perhaps wise to 
recommend at this time the separation of members of a family 
suffering from any signs of illness that may become detrimental 
to others. 

There are more Typhoid Fever cases in Andover this year 
than for many years previous, but after histories were compiled 
it was found they .were all imported cases. Owing to precaution 
and disinfection there were no secondary cases. 

Clinics attended, Tuberculosis, Child Welfare, Cancer, eye, 
ear, nose, and throat, and dental. 

93 



Public Health conferences attended, Boston, Rhode Island, 
New York and Haverhill. 

Several visits were received from representatives of the State 
Department of Health, including Doctor Simpson, our district 
health officer, Miss Ashley, nursing assistant, the late Doctor 
Gallivan of the Division of Tuberculosis, and Doctor Drury of 
the Division of Food and Drugs. 

Many Doctors attending the Public Health class of Harvard 
University were assigned to Andover for public health survey. 
There were Doctors from Bombay, India, Czecho Slovakia, 
Serbia, Maine and Kentucky. Visits were made to local dairies 
producing ordinary and certified milk, also schools and factories. 

Hogs have been a great source of complaint and it has been 
necessary to investigate this problem very closely. 

In view of the recent rules relating to Bakeries promulgated 
by the State Department of Health an inspection was made in 
company with one of their representatives, and their recom- 
mendations will be carried out. 

I would like to emphasize that all complaints to the Board 
must be made in writing and that all cases suffering from any 
communicable disease MUST be reported to the local Board of 
Health. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOTTA JOHNSON, R. N. 






94 



AUDITORS' CERTIFICATE 



We have examined the accounts of the several town officers 
and find them correctly cast, with satisfactory vouchers for all 
payments. 

The Town Treasurer has on deposit in Andover National 
Bank and cash on hand : 



General Fund 


$20526.48 


Town Farm Sale 


30145.23 


Water Loan 


2707.38 


Sewer Loans 


2533.81 


World War Memorial Committee 


2000.00 


War Memorial Book 


66.90 


Town Farm Committee 


300.00 




$58279.80 



JOHNS. ROBERTSON 
WALTER H. COLEMAN 
HARRY SELLARS 



Auditors 



95 



PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 



Rev. CHARLES W. HENRY, President 
HARRY H. NOYES, Clerk and Treasurer 

Rev. E. VICTOR BIGELOW MYRON E. GUTTERSON 
Rev. NEWMAN MATTHEWS FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 
WILLIAM ODLIN EDMOND E. HAMMOND 



96 



REPORT OF TREASURER 



PRINCIPAL FUND 
January 1, 1921 

Cash in banks $ 7677 . 16 

Real estate, mortgages and bonds 68977. 12 

Transferred from income account 200. 00 



December 314921 




»flW UOJt 


. z,o 


Cash in banks 


10911.21 






Real estate, mortgages and bonds 


65943.07 










76854. 


.28 






January 1, 1921 








Cash in banks 


7677.16 






Mortgages paid during year 


8880.00 






Transferred from income account 


200.00 










16757. 


16 


December 31, 1921 




Cash in banks 


10911.21 






Invested in new mortgages and bonds 


5845.95 










16757. 


16 


INCOME 




January 1, 1921 








Cash in Bank 


1661.54 






Interest 


4100.87 


^^o 


A 1 



EXPENDITURES 

N. C. Hamblin, Principal 800.00 

Helen M. Dunn, instructor 1550.00 

Hazel Underwood, instructor 1600.00 

Rogers and Angus, insurance 25 . 00 



Amount carried forward 



$3975.00 



97 



Amount brought forward 



$3975.00 



Andover National bank — box rent 


5.00 


Interest on bonds 


54.58 


City of Boston — taxes 


54.69 


Horace H. Atherton, legal papers 


2.00 


Stationery 


3.42 


Harry H. Noyes, Treasurer 


200.00 


Transferred to principal account 


200.00 


Balance 


1267.72 



5762.41 



BARNARD FUND 



January 1, 1921 . 




Cash in bank 


25.50 


Dividends 


40.00 


Prizes awarded 




First 


20.00 


Second 


12.00 


Third 


8.00 


December 31, Cash in bank 


25.50 



65.50 



65.50 



DRAPER FUND 



January 1, Cash in bank 1402.25 

Dividends 70.97 

Scholarship — Dorothy M. Ryley 30 . 00 

December 31, 1921 

Cash in Andover National Bank 30 . 00 

Cash in Andover Savings Bank 1413 . 22 



1473.22 



1473.22 



98 



GOLDSMITH FUND 
January 1, 1921 
Cash in bank 
Dividends 



Prizes awarded 

December 31, Cash in bank 



260.32 


13. 


15 


10 


00 


263 


.47 



273.47 



273.47 



HARRY H. NOYES, Treasurer 



99 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TOWN FARM 

/ 

In accordance with the vote of the special town meeting 
November 1, 1921 that the selectmen be a committee on ways 
and means for housing the inmates of the Town Farm and that 
they have power to add two other members to the committee, 
the names of Mrs. Annie Swan ton, matron at the Farm and 
Perley F. Gilbert, the well-known architect, were added. The 
committee has visited several institutions of this kind and have 
been in consultation with Mr. Bardwell, State inspector of Alms- 
houses. After long consideration the committee feels that a new 
building should be erected and accordingly Mr. Gilbert has pre- 
pared plans and specifications, which will be submitted with 
estimates of cost, at the coming annual, town meeting. 

The question of a site for the new building has also been given 
long consideration and the three following locations are suggested 
to the citizens of the town: Carmel Woods lot, land at junction 
of Burnham road and High street, and land on the plains at 
Ballard vale, all of which locations are owned by the town. 

WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 
ANNIE SWANTON 
PERLEY F. GILBERT 

Committee. 



100 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE 
ON REPRESENTATIVE TOWN MEETING 



In making this report, your committee has had in mind two 
factors, the immediate need of the Town of Andover for a change 
in its form of government and possibilities for the future. 

We do not find that an emergency exists which requires in- 
creased accommodation under the use of the printed voting list, 
but with a rapid increase in our population the question may 
arise in the near future. Suggestions and plans for civic im- 
provement in the form of new and commodious buildings are now 
in the hands of a committee, and we are unable to foretell what 
the carrying out of these plans may accomplish in overcoming 
such an emergency. We have therefore, after a study of plans 
now in use in various towns in our Commonwealth, and consulta- 
tion w : th the officials at the State House who are familiar with 
the framing of laws for the several towns now working under this 
new form of government, come to the conclusion, that the wise 
course to pursue is the printing in the annual report of the town, 
a sample act drawn from the plans now in operation, that the 
voters may have at hand for study and consideration such changes 
as are essential in the acceptance of an act to establish a so- 
called representative town meeting government. 

We do not at this time advise or repudiate the acceptance of 
such an act, but do advise a general discussion of this, or some 
similar act, at the annual town meeting in March 1922, with the 
hope that whatever may be decided will be in harmony with the 
best traditions of our town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. ABBOTT 
GEORGE L. AVERILL 
JOSEPH L. BURNS 
BARTLETT C. HAYES 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

101 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



In the Year One Thousand Nine Hundred and Twenty-Two. 



AN ACT 

To provide-for Precinct Voting, Representative Town Meetings, 
Town Meeting Members, a Referendum and an Annual 
Moderator in the Town of Andover. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in 
General Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as 
follows: 

Section 1. Upon the acceptance of this act by the town of 
Andover as hereinafter provided the selectmen of the town and 
the board of assessors, acting jointly and hereinafter referred to 
as the districting board, shall forthwith divide the territory 
thereof into not less than four voting precincts, each of which 
shall be plainly designated, and shall contain approximately an 
equal number of registered voters. Such precincts shall be so 
established as to consist of compact and contiguous territory, to 
be bounded as far as possible, by the centre line of known streets 
and ways and by other well-defined limits. Their boundaries 
shall be reviewed and, if need be, wholly or partly revised, by the 
districting board, in December, once in five years, or in December 
of any year when directed by a vote of the preceding annual town 
meeting. The districting board shall, within ten days after any 
establishment or revision of the precincts, file a report of their 
doings with the town clerk, the registrars of voters, and the 
assessors, with a map or maps or description of the precincts and 
the names and residences of the registered voters therein. The 

102 



districting board shall also cause to be posted in the town hall a 
map or maps or description of the precincts as established or 
revised from time to time, with the names and residences of the 
registered voters therein; and thjey shall also cause to be posted 
in at least one public place in each precinct a map or description 
of that precinct, with the names and residences of the registered 
voters therein. The division of the town into voting precincts 
and any revision of such precincts shall take effect upon the date 
of the filing of the report thereof by the districting board with the 
town clerk. Whenever such precincts are established or revised, 
the town clerk shall forthwith give written notice thereof to the 
secretary of the commonwealth, stating the number and desig- 
nation of such precincts. Meetings of the voters of the several 
precincts for elections, for primaries, and for voting upon any 
question to be submitted to all the voters of the town shall be 
held on the same day and at the same hour, and at such place or 
places within the town as the selectmen shall in the warrant for 
such meeting direct. The provisions of chapter eight hundred 
and thirty-five of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and 
thirteen and any amendments thereof relating to precinct voting 
at all elections, so far as the same are not inconsistent with this 
act, shall apply to all elections and primaries in the town upon 
establishment of voting precincts as hereinbefore provided. 

Section 2. The registered voters in each such precinct shall, 
at the first annual town election held after the establishments of 
such precincts, and conformably to the laws relative to elections 
not inconsistent with this act, elect by ballot thirty such voters 
in such precinct other than the ofhcers hereinafter designated in 
section three of this act as town meeting members at large, such 
elected voters to be town meeting members of the town, one third 
of whom shall be elected for the term of one year, one third for 
the term of two years and one- third for the term of three years 
from the date of the annual town meeting; and thereafter, except 
as hereinafter provided, at each annual town election the regis- 
tered voters of each precinct in the town shall, in like manner, 
elect ten of their number to be town meeting members of the 
town for the term of three years, and shall at such election fill 

103 



for the unexpired term or terms any vacancies then existing in 
the number of town meeting members in their respective pre- 
cincts. Upon every revision of the precincts or of any of them 
the term or terms of office of all town meeting members from each 
and every such revised precinct shall cease upon the election of 
their successors, and at the first ensuing annual town election 
thjere shall be an entirely new election of town meeting members 
in each and every precinct so revised, as well as in any new pre- 
cinct or precincts established. The town clerk shall, after every 
election of town meeting members, forthwith notify each member 
by mail of his election. 

Section 3. Any town meeting held under the provisions of 
this act, except as otherwise provided, shall, at and after the 
first annual election held under this act, be limited to the regis- 
tered voters elected under section two and together with the 
following, designated as town members at large; namely, any 
member of the general court of the commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, from the town; the moderator, the town clerk, the 
selectmen, the town treasurer, the town counsel, if a voter of the 
town, the town collector of taxes, the town auditor or auditors, 
the chairman of the school committee, the chairman of the trus- 
tees of the public library, the chairman of the board of health, 
the chairman of the park commission, the chairman of the water 
commissioners, the tree warden, the chairman of the board of 
public works and Spring Grove cemetery trustees, the chairman 
of the assessors of taxes, the chairman of the sinking fund com- 
mission, and the chairman of the finance committee. The town 
clerk shall notify the town meeting members of the time and place 
at which town meetings are to be held, such notices to be sent by 
mail at least seven days before any such meeting. The town 
meeting members, as aforesaid, shall be the judges of the election 
and qualification of their members. A majority of the town meet- 
ing members shall constitute a quorum for doing business; but 
a less number may organize temporarily and may adjourn from 
time to time. Notice of every adjourned town meeting shall be 
posted by the town clerk in each precinct in one or more public 
places, and such notices shall state briefly the business to be acted 

104 



upon at such meeting and shall include notice of any proposed 
reconsideration. All town meetings shall be public. The town 
meeting members as such shall receive no compensation. Sub- 
ject to such conditions as may be determined from time to time 
by the members of representative town meeting any voter of the 
town who is not a town meeting member may speak, but he shall 
not vote. A town meeting member may resign by filing a written 
resignation with the town clerk, and such resignation shall take 
effect on the date of such filing. A town meeting member who 
removes from the town or from the precinct from which he was 
elected shall cease to be a town meeting member. 

Section 4. Nominations of candidates for town meeting 
members to be elected under this act shall be made by nomination 
papers which shall bear no political designation, and signed by not 
less than ten registered voters of the precinct in which the candi- 
date resides and filed with the town clerk at least ten days before 
the election. No nomination papers shall be valid in respect to 
any candidate whose written acceptance is not thereon or at- 
tached thereto. 

Section 5. The articles in the warrant for every town meeting, 
so far as they relate to the election of the moderator, town officers, 
and town meeting members, as hereinbefore provided, to granting 
licenses for the sale of intoxicating liquOrs, referenda, and all 
matters to be acted upon and determined by ballot, shall be so 
acted upon and determined by the registered voters of the town 
in their respective precincts. All other articles in the warrant for 
any town meeting shall be acted upon and determined exclusively 
by town meeting members at a meeting to be held at such time 
and place as shall be set forth by the selectmen in the warrant 
for the meeting, and subject to the referendum provided for by 
section eight. 

Section 6. A moderator shall be elected by ballot at each 
annual town meeting and shall serve as the moderator of all 
town meetings except as otherwise provided by law until his 
successor is elected and qualified. Nominations for moderator 

105 



and his election shall be as in the case of other elective town 
officers, and any vacancy in such office may be filled by the town 
meeting members at a town meeting held for that purpose. If 
a moderator is absent, a moderator pro tempore may be elected 
by the town meeting members. 

Section 7. Any vacancy in the full number of town meeting 
members from any precinct may be filled until the next annual 
election by the remaining members of the precinct from among 
the registered voters thereof. Upon petition therefor, signed by 
not less than ten town meeting members from the precinct, 
notices thereof shall be promptly given by the town clerk to the 
remaining members from the precinct in which such vacancy or 
vacancies exist, and he shall call a special meeting of such mem- 
bers for the purpose of filling any vacancy. He shall cause to be 
mailed to each of such members, not less than four days before 
the time set for such meeting, a notice, specifying the object and 
the time and the place thereof. At such meeting a majority of the 
members shall constitute a quorum, and they shall elect from their 
own number a chairman and a clerk. The choice to fill any such 
vacancy shall be by ballot and a majority of the votes cast shall 
be required for a choice. The chairman and clerk shall make a 
certificate of such choice and forthwith file the same with the 
town clerk, together with a written acceptance by the member or 
members so chosen, who shall thereupon be deemed elected and 
qualified a town meeting member or members, subject to the 
right of all the town meeting members to judge of the election 
and qualifications of members as set forth in section three. 

Section 8. No article in the warrant shall at any representa- 
tive town meeting be finally disposed of by a vote to lay upon the 
table, to indefinitely postpone, or to take no action thereunder. 
No vote passed at any representative town meeting under any 
article in the warrant except a vote to adjourn or a vote for the 
temporary borrowing of money in anticipation of taxes shall be 
operative until after the expiration of seven days, exclusive of 
Sundays and holidays, from the dissolution of such meeting. 
If, within said seven days a petition, signed by not less than five 

106 



per cent of the registered voters of the town, containing their 
names together with their street addresses, is filed with the 
selectmen, asking that the question or questions involved in such 
vote be submitted to the voters of the town at large, then the 
selectmen within fourteen days of the filing of such petition, 
shall call a special meeting which shall be held within ten days 
after the issuing of the call, for the sole purpose of presenting to 
the voters at large the question or questions so involved. The 
polls shall be opened at two o'clock in the afternoon and shall be 
closed not earlier than eight o'clock in the evening, and no ballots 
shall be removed or counted before the closing of the polls, and 
all votes upon any questions submitted shall be taken by ballot 
and the check list shall be used in the several precincts in the 
same manner in which they are used in the election of town 
officers. Such question or questions as may be submitted at 
said town meeting shall be determined by the vote of a majority 
of such registered voters at large voting thereon at said special 
town meeting. The question or questions submitted to be voted 
upon at said town meeting shall be stated upon the ballot in the 
same language and form as said question or questions were stated 
when presented to said representative town meeting by the 
moderator, and as the same shall appear upon the records of the 
said representative town meeting. If such petition be not filed 
within the said period of seven days the vote in the representative 
town meeting shall become operative and effective upon the 
expiration of said period. 

Section 9. The town of Andover after the acceptance of this 
act, shall have the capacity to act through and to be bound by 
its said town meeting members who shall, when convened from 
time to time as hereinunder provided, constitute representative 
town meetings; and such representative town meetings shall 
exercise exclusively, so far as shall conform to the provisions of 
this act, all powers vested in the municipal corporation of the 
town. Action in conformity with all provisions of law now or 
hereafter applicable to the transaction of town affairs in town 
meetings shall, when taken by any representative town meeting 
in the town in accordance with the provisions of this act, have the 

107 



same force and effect as if said action had been taken in a town 
meeting, open to all the voters of said town, as heretofore organ- 
ized and conducted. 

Section 10. This act shall not abridge the right of the citizens 
of Andover to hold general meetings, according to any right secured 
to its voters or to the people by the constitution of this common- 
wealth; nor shall this act confer upon any representative town 
meeting in Andover the power finally to commit the town to any 
proposition affecting its municipal existence or change in the 
form of its government, without action thereon by the voters of 
the town at large, using the ballot and check lists therefor. 

Section 11. The question of the acceptance of this act by 
the town of Andover shall be submitted to the registered voters 
of that town at any annual or special town meeting to be called 
for the purpose. At such election the vote shall be taken by bal- 
lot in accordance with the provisions of chapter eight hundred and 
thirty-five of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and thirteen 
and any amendment thereof, so far as the same shall be appli- 
cable, in answer to the question: " Shall an act passed by the 
general court in the year nineteen hundred and twenty-two, 
entitled 'An act to provide for precinct voting, representative 
town meetings, town meeting members, a referendum and an 
annual moderator in the town of Andover' be accepted by this 
town?" and the affirmative votes of a majority of the registered 
voters of that town present and voting thereon shall be required 
for and shall determine its acceptance by that town. So much 
of this act as authorizes its submission to the registered voters of 
the town of Andover shall take effect upon its passage, but this 
act shall not take further effect unless and until accepted by the 
town of Andover as herein provided. . ' 






108 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL CONDI- 
TIONS IN SHAWSHEEN VILLAGE 



The School committee has made a careful survey of school 
conditions at Shawsheen Village, and is convinced that at least 
200 pupils will be located in the Richardson School district in 
1922, with a further steady increase as the village development 
goes on. The present building has two good sized rooms and one 
smaller one, all of which have now become overcrowded so that it 
will be necessary to do something to relieve the situation at once. 

About 105 pupils are now in attendance at the Richardson 
School, and the additional 100 pupils expected in 1922 would 
require four additional rooms. The development of the situation 
should be made not only from the standpoint of this immediate 
requirement, but with full consideration of future requirements. 
The first step should provide for securing sufficient land to 
accommodate not only the initial unit to be constructed, but the 
addition of several units as they may be needed, and playground 
and athletic facilities to serve requirements as the same are 
determined by the growth of the village. 

The present lot of land is not sufficient to care for this need, 
nor is the location capable of providing such added area as will 
ultimately be required. The center of the present school popu- 
lation in Shawsheen Village is in the vicinity of the junction of 
Warwick street with North Main street, with a future develop- 
ment contemplated on both sides of Main street that will evident- 
ly hold this same center when the development is completed. 
Available sites can now be secured before the full development 
takes place, and the committee recommends that immediate 
action be taken by the town to secure one of such sites, sub- 
stantially in accordance with an article submitted herewith: — 

Article 11. To see if the town will authorize the Selectmen 
and the School committee to serve as a joint committee to select 

109 



a suitable lot of land for municipal or town purposes in the 
district known as Shawsheen Village. 

If land that may be selected cannot be acquired by purchase, 
to authorize the Selectmen on behalf of the town to exercise the 
right of taking by eminent domain, awarding damages for land 
that may be taken, and making a report of their action at a 
special town meeting to be called not later than April 15, 1922, 
with a recommendation for an appropriation to cover the award 
and for such further action as may be necessary. 

DR. EDWARD C. CONROY, Chairman 
DAVID R. LAWSON, Secretary 

School Committee 



110 



TOWN WARRANT 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ss. : To either of the Constables of the Town of An- 
dover: Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to 
vote in elections and in town affairs to meet and assemble at the 
Town House in voting Precinct One and the Old School House 
Ballard Vale in voting Precinct Two, in said Andover, on 
Monday, the sixth day of March, 1922, at 6 o'clock a.m., 
to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To elect a Moderator for one year, Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for one 
year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, one 
member of the Board of Assessors for three years, three members 
of the School Committee for three years, Five Trustees of Punch- 
ard Free School for three years, two members of the Board of 
Public Works for three years, one member of the Board of Health 
for three years, three Auditors of accounts for one year, three 
Constables for one year, one Trustee of Memorial Hall Library 
for seven years, one Tree Warden for one year and all town 
officers required by law to be elected by ballot. Also to take 
action on the following question, Shall licenses be granted for the 
sale of certain non-intoxicating beverages in this town? 

All to be voted for on one ballot. The polls will be open from 
6 o'clock a.m. to 5 o'clock p.m. 

After final action on the preceding article one, the said meet- 
ing shall stand adjourned by virtue of Section 20, Chapter 39 of 
the General Laws to Monday March 13th, at 1.30 o'clock p.m. 
at the Town Hall, then and there to act upon the following 
Articles, namely: 

111 



Article 2. — To elect all other officers not required by law 
to be elected by ballot. 

Article 3. — To determine what sums of money shall be ap- 
propriated for Almshouse Expenses, Relief out of Almshouse, 
Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children, Board of Health, 
Brush Fires, Fire Department, Hay Scales, Highway Department, 
Insurance, Interest, Memorial Hall Library, Memorial Day, 
Post 99, G. A. R., Miscellaneous, Parks and Plays teads, Police, 
Printing and Stationery, Public Dump, Retirement of Veterans, 
Redemption of Water, Sewer, High School, and Shaw sheen Bridge 
Bonds, Schools, Sewer Maintenance, Sewer Sinking Funds, 
Soldiers' Relief, Spring Grove Cemetery, State Aid, Street Light- 
ing, Town Officers, Town House, Tree Warden, Moth Depart- 
ment, Water Maintenance, Construction and Sinking Funds, 
and other town charges and expenses. 

Article 4. — To see if the town will approve the recommenda- 
tion of the Board of Public Works and vote to reconstruct the 
highway on Main Street from Chapel Avenue to Andover Square, 
with macadam pavement or other road material in accordance 
with plans and specifications prepared by the State Department 
of Public Works, Division of Highways. Also to see if the town 
will vote that said work of reconstruction be done by contract 
under the supervision of the Board of Public Works at an ex- 
pense not to exceed $100,000. Also to see if the town will vote 
that notes or bonds of the town be issued to raise funds for the 
payment of work undertaken under this article, payable annually 
in the years 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926 and 1927, in conformity with 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws. 

Article 5. — To see if the Town will authorize and direct the 
Board of Public Works to petition the legislature for authority 
to issue bonds or notes, outside the statutory limit to the amount 
of $40,000. to be denominated on the face thereof ''Andover 
Water Loan, Act of 1922", said loan to be for the purpose of 
making necessary changes in and extending the present system 
of water works in the town of Andover under such terms and 

112 



conditions as the General Court may provide, on petition of the 
Board of Public Works. 

Article 6. — To see if the town will authorize and direct the 
Board of Public Works to petition the Legislature for authority 
to borrow $200,000. outside the statutory limit of indebtedness, 
by bond issue or otherwise, for the following purposes; To con- 
struct and maintain a pipe line, in accordance with plans ap- 
proved by the State Board of Health, for the purpose of disposing 
of the sewage of the Town of Andover, said pipe line to extend 
from Andover through the City of Lawrence to the Merrimack 
River, and to authorize the purchase or taking of land in said 
Andover and Lawrence necessary for said site and to award and 
pay damages for said purchases or takings. On petition of the 
Board of Public Woiks. 

Article 7. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$15,000.00 as their share of the cost in the reconstruction of 
Main street by the State, through Shawsheen Village on petition 
of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 8. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$5,748.08 to pay the balance due on Haverhill Street Sewer on 
petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 9. — To hear the report of the committee on housing 
the inmates of the Town Farm and to see if the town will appro- 
priate the sum of $10,000. in addition to the $30,000. now on 
hand, received from the sale of the Town Farm property, for the 
rjurpose of erecting a new building and other necessary expenses. 

Article 10. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
Three thousand ($3000) dollars to purchase the property in 
Whittier Court, adjacent to the Playstead, known as the Cun- 
ningham property, and consisting of approximately one (l)acre 
of land with the buildings thereon, on petition of Frederic S. Bout- 
well and others. 

113 



Article 11. — To see if the town will authorize the Selectmen 
and the School Committee to serve as a joint committee to select 
a suitable lot of land for municipal or town purposes in the district 
known as Shawsheen Village. If the land that may be selected 
cannot be acquired by purchase, to authorize the Selectmen on 
behalf of the town to exercise the right of taking by eminent 
domain, awarding damages for land that may be taken, and 
making a report of their action at a special town meeting to be 
called not later than April 15, 1922, with a recommendation for 
an appropriation to cover the award and for such further action 
as may be necessary, on petition of the School Committee. 

Article 12. — To hear and act upon the report of the War 
Memorial Committee. 

Article 13. — To see if the town will, for the purpose of pro- 
viding a suitable headquarters for a post of the American Legion, 
approve the leasing of a building or part of a building which 
shall be under the direction and control of such post subject to 
such regulations as the town may adopt, and to see if the town 
will appropriate for the current year the sum of not more than 
$1500 therefor, as provided for in General Laws, Chapter 40, 
Section 9, on petition of the War Memorial Committee. 

Article 14. — To see if the town will adopt changes in the vot- 
ing precincts of the town as recommended by the Selectmen in 
a statement filed with the Town Clerk in accordance with the 
provisions of Section 7, Chapter 54 of the General Laws. 

Article 15. — To see if the Town will accept the provisions of 
Sections 42, 43 and 44 of Chapter 48 of the General Laws relating 
to the establishment of a fire department under the control of an 
officer to be known as the Chief of the Fire Department. 

Article 16. — To see if the town will accept as a town way, as 
laid out by the Selectmen, the street now known as Magnolia 
Avenue extending from the junction of Corbett Street and Poor 
Street, and running northerly 1148 feet and 39 feet in width to 
land now owned by James Mulligan, on petition of James Mul- 
ligan and others. 

114 



Article 17. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$150. for the purpose of engraving into the Pilgrim Memorial 
Monument at Province town the name of the Town of Andover 
and the year of its incorporation, on petition of John H. Soehrens 
and others. 

Article 18. — To hear and act on the report of the committee 
appointed to consider the matter of a representative town meeting 
for the Town of Andover. 

Article 19. — To fix the pay of the call firemen for the ensuing 
year. 

Article 20. — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 21. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in anticipation of the revenue of the 
current financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

Article 22. — To determine what disposition shall be made of 
unexpended appropriations. 

Article 23. — To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

Article 24. — To determine the amount of money to be raised 
by taxation the ensuing year. 

Article 25. — To transact any other business that may legally, 
come before the meeting. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof, seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your do- 
ings thereon, at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this twenty- third day of February, A.D. 
1922. 

WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Selectmen of Andover 
115 



RECOMMENDATIONS OF FINANCE 
COMMITTEE 



The Finance Committee has given careful consideration to the 
budgets of the various town departments for 1922 also to the 
special articles in the warrant calling for appropriations and gives 
herewith its recommendations. 

It is unfortunate that the department budgets are not presented 
to the finance committee at an earlier date in order to give op- 
portunity for more full discussion of the department require- 
ments. It is suggested that all departments prepare their budgets 
for next year as early as possible and present them to the finance 
committee by Jan. 1st, in writing, with full details, and with 
definite recommendations for action by the town. 

If full and careful investigation of all projects are made by 
the departments, and all problems are thoroughly worked out 
in department meetings before presenting them to the finance 
committee much time can be saved and more information can 
be given the town which will assist the voters in arriving at a 
decision on expenditure of the town money. 

During the year we have been able to be of assistance in having 
a survey made of the fire protection service by the New England 
Insurance Exchange which has given valuable data and sug- 
gestions to the Water and Fire Depts. 

At the time of the heavy ice storm the hearty co-operation of 
the various departments was secured to effectively and promptly 
clear the streets and to take care of the necessary financing for 
the emergency. 

A new plan of town accounting has been prepared which is 
based on the State forms but on account of some changes ne- 
cessary to make it effective it is planned to present this forapprov- 
a next year. 

116 



Recommendations 
Almshouse $ 6000.00 

(This sum is required for the running expenses 
of the Town Farm.) 
Almshouse Relief out. 5000 . 00 

(Because of the business depression the de- 
mands on this department are greater than ever 
before and it is estimated by the Overseers of 
the Poor that at least five thousand dollars — one 
thousand dollars more than last year — will be 
required for the coming year.) 
Aiding Mothers with Dependent children 2500.00 

Board of Health 3300.00 

Brush Fires 600.00 

Election and Registration 1000.00 

(This item was formerly carried under the ap- 
propriation for miscellaneous expenditures and 
town officers.) 
Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital 2700.00 

(Andover must pay approximately fourteen 
hundred dollars toward the running expenses of 
this institution for the period from June to De- 
cember 1921. The Finance Committee recom- 
mend that thirteen hundred dollars additional 
be appropriated to meet Andover's proportion 
of this expense during 1922. 
Fire Department 23000.00 

and receipts 
It was recommended last year that considera- 
tion be given to the organization of the De- 
partment to see if some saving in cost could 
not be made without impairing the fire fighting 
efficiency. The selectmen have considered the 
matter and now propose a permanent chief, 
the giving up of the board of engineers, and 
the dropping of several call men. The net 



A mount carried forward $44 100.00 

117 



A mount brought forward 



$44100.00 



result will be an increase in the rate of an- 
nual expenditure of a few hundred dollars 
but a gain in efficiency which it is believed 
fully justifies the proposed changes. 

No reduction in the cost of the department ap- 
pears possible for the coming year. In order 
to get for the town a larger return for the 
money spent, over half of which goes to pay 
the salaries of the permanent men, it is the 
intention to enlarge and improve the inspec- 
tion service which the permanent firemen have 
been performing to some extent. This has 
proved valuable in other places and under the 
proposed new organization it should be pos- 
sible to make it render an important service 
to the citizens of Andover in helping to re- 
move unnecessary fire risks. 

Much good work was done during the past 
year by the permanent men in refitting the 
pumping engine and doing other similar work 
in the way of keeping the apparatus and gen- 
eral equipment in the best possible condition. 
The adoption of the two-platoon system very 
much increased the cost of the department, 
but if work of this kind can be done by the 
regular men, either- for the upkeep of the fire 
department or for other town departments 
the citizens will obtain a reasonable return for 
the money spent. 

Hay Scales 

Highway Department 

Maintenance $30000.00 

New Construction 30000 . 00 

(This sum is the same as was appropriated last 



$125 
60000 



Amount carried forward 



$104225.00 



118 



Amount brought forward 



$104225.00 



year, viz: $30,000 for maintenance and $30,000 
for new construction. The new construction 
contemplated includes Phillips Street, Abbot 
Street and Essex Street from the railroad cross- 
ing to Shawsheen Road and Shawsheen Road 
from Essex Street to Stevens street. The Finance 
Committee is advised by the Board of Public 
Works that when Phillips and Abbot Streets 
are built the program of road construction in the 
center of the town will be approximately com- 
pleted and a substantially smaller appropriation 
will be required next year for new work.) 

Interest 

Insurance 

Fire $3000.00 

Workmen's Compensation 2500.00 

Library 

Memorial Day 

G. A. R. 

Miscellaneous 

Parks and Playsteads 

Police Department 

(This appropriation includes the sum of $600. 
for the purchase of an automobile truck for the 
use of the Police Department. ) 

Printing and Stationery 

Public Dump 

Retirement of Veterans 

Retirement of Bonds 

Sewer $7000.00 

High School 6000.00 

Haverhill St. Bridge 2500 . 00 

Schools 

(This is the amount that was appropriated last 
year.) 



14000 


00 


5500 


00 


3000 


.00 


550. 


00 


100. 


00 


1200. 


00 


1200. 


00 


11000. 


00 



2000.00 

75.00* 

300.00' 

15500. 00; 



103420.00 



Amount carried forward 



$262070.00 



119 



Amount brought forward $262070.00 

Sewer Department 4000.00 

Labor and Power $3000 . 00 

Sinking Fund 1000.00 

Soldiers' Relief 1500.00 

Spring Grove Cemetery 2500.00 

and receipts 
from sale of lots 
(The Finance Committee is advised by the Ceme- \ 
tery Trustees that the sum of fifteen hun- 
dred dollars and the receipts from the sale 
of burial lots is required for the upkeep of the 
Cemetery and one thousand dollars is the sum 
required for development work.) 
State Aid 1000.00 

Street Lighting S200.00 

(This recommendation is based on the present 
street lighting installation, viz: 
300— 60 Watt lights at $17.50 $5250.00 
4— 100 Watt lights at 28.00 112.00 

56—250 Watt lights at 49 . 50 2772 . 00 

and an additional 
10— 60 Watt lights at $17.50 175.00 



$8309.00 
(There is still some question as to the amount 
of light which should be provided in several 
sections of the town and the Lighting Com- 
mittee proposes to make some further experi- 
ments. The recommendation of last year is 
repeated, viz: that there should be equality of 
lighting for all sections of the town when the 
conditions are generally similar.) 
Town Officers 10000.00 

(This includes the salaries of the Town Officers 
in the following amounts: Selectmen, $2500, 
Town Clerk and Treasurer, $2400, Collector 



Amount carried forward $289270. 0( 

120 



Amount brought forward $289270. 00 

of Taxes, $1800, Premium on bonds for collector 
and treasurer, $180, Stenographer, $1040, 
Auditor, $300, Moderator, $10, Building In- 
spector, $500, Sealer of weights and measures, 
$200, Town Counsel, $400, Field driver $25, 
and expenses of Town Officers, $500.) 
Town House 3000.00 

Tree Warden and Moth Work $12900.00 

(This year Andover is required by the State to 
spend $4300 for moth work. In addition it is 
recommended that $1200 be appropriated for 
repairs and replacements of the equipment used 
in moth work: this includes $350 for a small 
power sprayer. The care of trees has cost the 
town $2400 since January first of this year and 
$5000 more will be required to repair the dam- 
age done by the recent storm and carry on the 
regular work of this department. Last year the 
Finance Committee suggested the advisability 
of a closer connection between the Tree Warden 
and Moth work department and the Board of 
Public works. The experience of the past year 
confirms the Finance's Committee opinion that 
these departments should be consolidated and 
a bill has been presented to the Legislature call- 
ing for the abolition of the office of Tree Warden 
and the placing of the duties of this department 
with the Board of Public Works; if this bill is 
passed by the Legislature it will be brought be- 
fore the voters for action.) 
Water Dept. 6750.00 

Under the plan adopted at the town meeting in 
March 1921 the Water Dept. is now operated by 
a separate business under the Board of Public 
Works. The estimates for 1922 are as follows: 



Amount carried forward $311920.00 

121 



Operation $20000.00 

Construction 2000.00 

Retirement of Bonds 8000 . 00 

Interest on Bonds 4000 . 00 

Sinking Fund 750.00 



34750.00 
Total receipts expected • 28000 . 00 



6750.00 



(Difference to be appropriated by Town and 
which may be considered payment to the Water 
department for furnishing water for fire fighting.) 

The Finance Committee respectfully recommends the fol- 
lowing action regarding the articles in the warrant: — 

Article 4. To see if the town will approve the recommendation 
of the Board of Public Works and vote to reconstruct the 
highway on Main Street from Chapel Avenue to Andover 
Square with macadam pavement or other road material in 
accordance with plans and specifications prepared by the 
State Department of Public Works. (Division of Highways) 
Also to see if the town will vote that said work of reconstruc- 
tion be done by contract under the supervision of the Board 
of Public Works at an expense not to exceed $100,000. Also 
to see if the town will vote that notes or bonds of the town 
be issued to raise funds for the payment of work undertaken 
under this article, payable annually in the years 1923, 1924, 
1925, 1926, and 1927, in conformity with chapter 44 of the 
General Laws. 

(Approved. — The condition of Main street is such that im- 
mediate action is advisable. Much traffic is now directed to 
School and Bartlet Streets because of the condition of Main 
Street, and as a result both these streets, built for light 
vehicle traffic, are wearing fast. The type of traffic passing 
over Main Street demands construction of the substantial 

122 



type called for in the above article. Arrangements for the 
relocating of the street railway tracks, the placing of conduits 
for underground wiring and the renewal and installation of 
all necessary sewer, gas and water pipes are matters which 
must be cared for in connection with the street construction.) 

Article 5. To see if the Town will authorize and direct the Board 
of Public Works to petition the legislature for authority to 
issue bonds or notes, outside the statutory limit to the 
amount of $40,000. to be denominated on the face thereof 
"Andover Water Loan, Act of 1922", said loan to be for the 
purpose of making necessary changes in and extending the 
present system of water works in the town of Andover under 
such terms and conditions as the General Court may provide, 
on petition of the Board of Public works. 

(Approved. — This amount will be needed for extension 
which should be made in the near future and is approved. 
It is recommended that only as much of it as required for 
the most pressing needs be expended this year.) 

Article 6. To see if the Town will authorize and direct the 
Board of Public Works to petition the Legislature for 
authority to borrow $200,000. outside the statutory limit 
of indebtedness, by bond issue or otherwise, for the following 
purposes: To construct and maintain a pipe line, in ac- 
cordance with plans approved by the State Board of Health, 
' for the purpose of disposing of the sewage of the Town of 
Andover, said pipe line to extend from Andover through the 
City of Lawrence to the Merrimack River, and to authorize 
the purchase or taking of land in said Andover and Lawrence 
necessary for said site and to award and pay damages for 
said purchases or takings. On petition of the Board of 
Public Works. 

(Not approved. — Some improvement in the present methods 
of handling the sewage of the town is necessary and the ap- 
proval of the State Dept. of Health must be obtained before 
any plan can be adopted. This is a problem of much im- 

123 



portance and further information is needed on several points 
before any plan can be approved. It is expected that ad- 
ditional facts will be available before the town meeting so 
that it may be possible then to advise more definitely.) 

Article 7. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$15,000.00 as its share of the cost in the reconstruction of 
Main Street by the State, through Shawsheen Village on 
petition of the Board of Public Works. 
(Approved.) 

Article 8. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$5,748.08 to pay the balance due on Haverhill Street Sewer 
on petition of Board of Public Works. 
(Approved.) 

Article 9. To hear the report of the committee on housing the 
inmates of the Town Farm and to see if the town will ap- 
propriate the sum of $10,000. in addition to the $30,000. on 
hand, received from the sale of the Town Farm property, for 
the purpose of erecting a new building and other necessary 
expenses. (Not approved.) 

(The Finance committee recommends that the town shall 
provide proper housing facilities for the poor at a cost not 
v to exceed $30,000. and if possible an existing building be se- 
cured which can be adequately fitted to serve the needs of 
the town for an almshouse at a cost not to exceed $20000. 
These limitations are recommended because there is much 
uncertainty as to what the future needs may be. The tend- 
ency today is to take care of the poor, as far as possible in 
ways other than the in old-time type of almshouse. It is be- 
lieved that reasonable provision can be made for the present 
needs, with opportunity for a small increase in numbers, 
within the expenditures recommended. One of the arguments 
advanced for selling the old property was that it would per- 
mit taking care of the unfortunate under simpler and more 
economical conditions. It is therefore undesirable to now 
re-establish a large institution of this kind. If a new build - 

124 



ing is erected it should be so designed that moderate exten- 
sions could be made readily and at a reasonable cost, thus 
putting the town in a position to meet such future needs as 
might develop.) 

Article 10. To see if the town will appropriate the sum of Three 
Thousand Dollars ($3000) to purchase the property in 
Whittier Court adjacent to the Playstead, known as the 
Cunningham property, and consisting of approximately one 
(1) acre of land with the buildings thereon, on petition of 
Frederic S. Boutwell and others. 
(Approved.) 

Article 11. To see if the town will authorize the Selectmen and 
the School Committee to serve as a joint committee to select 
a suitable lot of land for municipal or town purposes in the 
district known as Shawsheen Village. If land that may be 
selected cannot be acquired by purchase, to authorize the 
Selectmen on behalf of the town to exercise the right of 
taking by eminent domain, awarding damages for land that 
may be taken, and making a report of their action at a 
special town meeting to be called not later than April 15, 
1922, with a recommendation for an appropriation to cover 
the award and for such further action as may be necessary. 
(This article does not require action on the part of the 
Finance Committee.) 

Article 12. To hear and act upon the report'of the War Memorial 
Committee. 

(The recommendation of the War Memorial Committee 
for further investigation under the condition of the original 
motion is approved. ) 

Article 13. To see if the town will for the purpose of providing 
a suitable headquarters for a post of the American Legion 
approve the leasing of a building or part of a building which 
shall be under the direction and control of such post subject 

125 



to such regulations as the town may adopt, and to see if the 
town will appropriate for the current year, the sum of not 
more than $1500 therefor, as provided for in G. L. Ch. 40, 
Sec. 9, on petition of the War Memorial Committee. 
(Approved.) 

Article 17. That the name of the Town of And over and the 
year of its incorporation be engraved into the Pilgrim Memo- 
rial Monument at Provincetown and to appropriate a sum 
of One Hundred and Fifty dollars ($150) for the same. 
(Approved.) 



SUMMARY 



Department appropriations recommended 
Special appropriations recommended 



State Tax (estimated) 
County Tax (estimated) 



$32000.00 
20000.00 



$311920.00 
28898.00 

$340818.00 



52000.00 



RESOURCES 



$392818.00 



Cash 


$ 5000.00 




Corporation and Bank tax (estimated) 


28000.00 




State Aid 


700.00 




Outside relief 


1200.00 




Sundries 


2000.00 




From State for Schools 


7500.00 




Income Tax 


20000.00 




' 




64400.00 








$328418:00 



126 



VALUATION 

1920 1921 1922 (est.) 

Personal $ 2042541.00 $ 2309395.00 $ 2309395.00 

Real Estate 8044225 . 00 8638965 . 00 9438975 . 00 



$10086766.00 $10948360.00 $11748370.00 

Computation of tax rate using these figures. 

$328418 
• • • $28.00 



$11748370 



Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY A. BODWELL, Chairman 

GEORGE ABBOT 

GEORGE L. AVERILL 

JOHN H. CAMPION 

E. V. FRENCH 

C. W. HOLLAND 

JOHN C. ANGUS, Secretary 

Finance Committee 



127 



TRUSTEES OF 
MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



E. KENDALL JENKINS ALFRED E. STEARNS 

FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL BURTON S. FLAGG 

CHARLES U. BELL NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 

FREDERICK A. WILSON 

President 
E. KENDALL JENKINS 

Secretary and Treasurer 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 

Librarian 
EDNA A. BROWN 

Assistants 

JULIA E. TWICHELL EDITH DONALD 

AGATHA WADE 

In Charge of Ballardvale Branch 
MARTHA D. BYINGTON 

Janitor 
ARCHIBALD MACLAREN 



128 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



FORTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BOARD 
OF TRUSTEES 



The trustees of the Memorial Hall Library submit herewith 
their annual report to the town for the year 1921. 

A statement of the work done by the library will be found 
in the report of the librarian which follows. We urge every 
citizen carefully to examine it. We desire especially to commend 
the service rendered by Miss Brown as librarian. 

The trustees are glad to co-operate with the schools in the 
education of our children and young people, and to be the means 
not only of furnishing entertainment and interest to the older 
residents of the town but of reminding them that education is 
never finished and that there is always something more to be 
learned. They urge every citizen to take out and read more 
books. 

The pressing problem in the library is the need of more room. 
Before long the present building must be enlarged or a new one 
built better fitted for modern library methods. The town must 
keep this in mind. 

There may soon be need of a branch in Shawsheen village, 
although the present building is not difficult of access from 
there. A much larger sum could well be spent for books. 

Finally we commend the library to the town as one of the 
most important departments of our public service. It is not an 
experiment. For fifty years it has been a blessing and an honor 
to the town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. KENDALL JENKINS, Chairman 
CHARLES U. BELL 
ALFRED E. STEARNS 
NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 
BURTON S. FLAGG 
FREDERICK A. WILSON 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 

129 



TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 
In account with the Town of Andover, Mass. 



RECEIPTS 

Balance from last year 

Town Appropriation 

Dog Tax 

Income from Investments 

Fines 

Gifts for Books and Periodicals 

Cash paid for lost books 

Sale of paper 



Total 



EXPENDITURES 



Salaries 

Lighting and Heating 

Periodicals 

Bookbinding 

Books 

Insurance 

Office Expenses 

Sundry Items 

Cash on hand 

Total 



$2434.58 


3000 


.00 


323 


.52 


3308 


.01 


237.42 


127 


.18 


6 


.98 


9 


.00 


$9446.69 


$4571.35 


698. 


19 


247. 


,65 


400.35 


1061. 


.57 


46.87 


114. 


23 


263. 


73 


2042. 


75 



$9446.69 



130 



Classification of Income and Expenditures for the Year 1921 





INCOME 








Maint. 


Book 


Cornell 


Total 


Income from Investments 


$2134.87 


$827.64 


$345.50 


$3308.01 


Appropriation 


3000.00 






3000.00 


Dog Tax 


323.52 






323.52 


Fines 


237.42 






237.42 


Cash for lost books 




6.98 




6.98 


Gifts 


7.18 


120.00 




127.18 


Sale of paper 


9.00 






9.00 



Total 



$5711.99 $954.62 $345.50 $7012.11 



EXPENDITURES 



Salaries 


$4463.01 




$108.34 


$4571.35 


Lighting and Heating 


543.03 




155.16 


698.19 


Periodicals 


247.65 






247.65 


Book-binding 


400.35 






400.35 


Books 




1061.57 




1061.57 


Insurance 


46.87 






46.87 


Office Expenses 


114.23 






114.23 


Sundry Items 


237.95 




25.78 


263.73 


Total 


$6053.09 


$1061.57 


$289.28 


$7403.94 


Unexpended balances 






56.22 




Deficits 


341.10 


106.95 




391.83 



Condition of Funds and Unexpended Income, Jan. 1922 



Maintenance Fund 
Book Funds 
Cornell Fund (Per.) 
Cornell Fund (Pur.) 
Special Funds 



Deficit in Inc. in Maintenance Fund 
Total Funds 
Total cash on hand 

* Deficit. 



Funds 


Income 


$46600.00 


$ 358.37* 


17400.00 


957.05 


5000.00 


407.63 


4257.14 


730.35 




306.09 



$73257.14 



$2401.12 
358.37 

$2042.75 



131 



INVESTMENTS 



Bangor & Aroostook R. R. 4s 

Boston Elevated Ry. Co. 4s 

Boston Elevated Ry. Co., 4^s 

Chicago Railways Co., 5s 

Montreal Tramways Co., 5s 

Michigan State Tel. Co., 5s 

Boston & Albany Equip. Trust 4j^s 

Boston & Maine R. R. 4s 

Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., 5s 

American Tel. & Tel. Co., stock 4 shares 

Mortgage on Real Estate 

Savings Banks 

Principal Cash 

Total 



$11000. 


00 


10000. 


00 


1000. 


00 


9962. 


50 


9962. 


50 


4981. 


25 


2981. 


10 


2000 


00 


1000. 


00 


571 


.50 


4000 


.00 


15657 


.14 


141 


.15 


$73257, 


.14 



We certify that we have examined and found correct the above 
statements as of January 16, 1922, whereby all securities held 
against the several funds have been examined and the income 
accruing from same accounted for. 

All disbursements are supported by receipts in proper form 
and the cash has been verified and found correct. 



January 31, 1922 



BURTON S. FLAGG 
CHARLES U. BELL 

Finance Committee 



132 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 



January 11, 1922. 

To the Trustees of the Memorial Hall Library: 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit the report of the library for the twelve 
months ending December 31, 1921. 

During 1920, which was a most successful year in the history 
of the library, and which in itself showed a big increase in use, 
the circulation of books was 44,398. During the twelve months 
just ended, the people of Andover have borrowed for home use 
the large number of 51,113 volumes, an increase over 1920 of 
6715 books. Considering that the town population is but 8268, 
this use is extraordinary and forms a remarkable record. It 
shows what a vital part of the community life the Memorial 
Hall Library has become. 

During the busiest months of the year, it has been necessary 
to have extra assistance, in order to leave the librarian free to 
answer questions and to attend to people who come for help in 
looking up topics. The satisfaction of the public with this 
arrangement is evident. They no longer feel obliged to preface 
a request with an apology for interrupting an obviously busy 
person. It is also a satisfaction to the librarian to be at liberty 
to leave the loan-desk, to be able to give full attention to ref- 
erence work, and not to be obliged to cram into each mo- 
ment more than could possibly be done. It is to this wise arrange- 
ment of the Trustees in affording the librarian more assistance 
that much of the increased use of the library can be attributed. 

Though the present circulation of books is large, there may 
still be people who do not realize how free from red tape is the 
library administration nor how liberal its rules. Any child of 
ten may have a card — if we had a children's room with space 
for both children and books, a card would be given to any child 

133 



capable of writing his name. For children under fourteen, we 
ask for the signature of both parent and teacher. Having com- 
plied with this slight formality, the child is at liberty to take 
one book at a time and to exchange it at will. It is quite a 
custom in Andover for a child to celebrate his tenth birthday 
by obtaining a library card, and on several occasions, the neces- 
sary blank has been placed among the birthday gifts. All 
children over fourteen may borrow two books at a time, pro- 
vided that only one is a story. Grown people may take as many 
books as they wish, but only one may be a seven-day book. 
With the exception of these one-week books, any book may be 
renewed, even indefinitely, if it has not been asked for by others. 

There has been little improvement in the cost of books. They 
are yet extremely expensive, and the library is trying the ex- 
periment of buying fiction and juveniles in reinforced bindings, 
thus increasing the durability of the books and prolonging the 
time of use before being rebound. Fortunately, it has proved 
easier this past year to obtain the books needed by different 
study clubs, and we have not experienced the trying delays 
and disappointments which were our fate during 1920. This 
has been a source of satisfaction to both the librarian and the 
club members. Every effort is made to obtain books wanted, 
which are not on our shelves, and we are indebted to the Boston 
Public Library and to the Haverhill Public Library for loans. 

Among the gifts of 1921 are two which should receive especial 
mention; one from the estate of Mrs. Abbie M. Smart, who 
left to the library about fifty books, among them handsomely 
bound sets of Scott and Dickens. By the will of Charlotte 
Helen Abbott, the library received all her books. Among them 
was a valuable genealogical dictionary, and several genealogies, 
which are a distinct asset to our collection. It is pleasant to 
know that in her will, Miss Abbott defined this bequest as an 
appreciation of the unfailing courtesy and kindness shown her 
during many years by the Trustees and the library staff. 

The library has also received a gift of $100 through the will of 
Ellen Cabot of Brookline. There are minor gifts of books and 
money from summer visitors who take this way of expressing 
thanks for the library privileges granted to them. It is not 

134 



uncommon for these visitors to express regret at leaving a town 
where they have found an unusual generosity extended by the 
local library. We also appreciate the thoughtful kindness of 
one gentleman who has twice taken the trouble to purchase in 
town on the day of its issue and bring to us, a book of especial 
interest and importance. Another constant user presents at 
intervals a sum of money to be spent in the purchase of interest- 
ing novels, and yet another always remembers the book fund 
with a five-dollar bill at Christmas. 

The Smith and Dove Company are presenting to the reading- 
room a subscription to the "Textile World", which will be as 
much appreciated by the workers in that line as is the "India 
Rubber World," provided by the Tyer Rubber Company. 
Through the kindness of the Massachusetts Library Commission, 
the library has shared yet further in the distribution of books 
no longer needed in army camps, and we obtained a number of 
valuable works on automobiles, chemistry, business manuals of 
several types, and a set on foreign trade, all of which have inter- 
ested the young men of the town. 

The use of the library by the schools has been extensive. 
Both the town and parochial schools appeal to it constantly for 
help and for books to be used in classrooms. We have loaned 
books to both Phillips and Abbot Academies. The usual set of 
lectures on the use of reference books was given to the sophomore 
class in the Punchard High School with uncommonly satisfac- 
tory results. It is always a revelation to these young people to 
find what a storehouse of knowledge the library is, and also a 
surprise to know the pleasure of using books intelligently. 

The November ice-storm robbed us of our magnificent horse- 
chestnut which had been the pride and beauty of Andover 
Square for many years. It is a loss which can never be replaced. 
With the many laments over its going came one comment which 
affords food for thought. One person remarked that now the 
tree was gone, the library stood fully revealed, and she, for 
one, realized for the first time in what ridiculously small quarters 
so important a part of Andover's educational system was trying 
to serve the community. Small as it may seem outside, it is 
even smaller inside. Crowded shelves and narrow aisles cramp 

135 



its use. The children, who ought to have a room of their own, 
with the space and freedom and attention which are their due, 
are confined to one corner of the reading-room, where they 
often sit on the floor for lack of seats. 

The record of the year just past, with adequate help in busy 
hours, is an indication of what might be done under still better 
conditions. If the central library could have more space for 
books, could have a room for the children, the work would ex- 
pand amazingly. The branch at Ballardvale has been a success 
since its beginning; there is an ample field for a branch in Shaw- 
sheen Village, and there is an earnest desire on the part of the 
residents in that section that one should be started by the town. 

The Memorial Hall Library is an essential part of the town 
life. It is doing good work with the schools and with the children 
under hampering conditions. Fortunately, there is a gleam of 
hope in that the young people who have used and appreciated 
the library during the past fifteen years, are growing into their 
heritage in the town affairs, and are showing a gratifying opin- 
ion that it is high time Andover's library had a better chance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDNA A. BROWN, 

Librarian. 



136 



STATISTICS OF THE LIBRARY 

Number of books issued for home use at the Memorial 

Hall 43583 

Number of books issued at Ballardvale 7530 

Total for the year of 1921 51113 

Percentage of fiction circulated 70 

Percentage of non-fiction circulated 30 

Number of borrowers' cards in use 2624 

Books added by purchase 601 

Books added by gift 192 

Total accessions 793 

Books withdrawn, worn out, etc. 374 

Total number of volumes in the library « 25425 

Volumes rebound 346 

Volumes bound, periodicals, etc. 87 

BALLARDVALE 

Number of books issued for home use 7530 

Number of cards in use 420 

Books added by purchase 88 

Books added by gift 25 

Total accessions 113 

Books now belonging to the branch 1708 

Gifts of books and pamphlets are acknowledged from state 
and government departments, from other libraries, from the 
A. V. I. S.; the estate of Charlotte H. Abbott; the estate of 
Mrs Abbie M. Smart, and from the following individuals: 

C. K. Bancroft; Judge C. U. Bell; Miss E. F. Brown; M. W. 
Colquhoun; Mrs. James Craig; Austin Drew; J. H. Dye; 
Howard French; J. C. Graham; Mrs. E. R. Green; N. H. 
Hamblin; Rev. C. W. Henry; Miss Houlotte; Mrs. J. H. 
Kidder; Mrs. E. E. Mitchell; Mrs. George Ripley; G. B. Rip- 
ley; Rev. F. R. Shipman; Dr. Roger Tracy. 



137 



INFORMATION FOR USERS OF THE LIBRARY 



The Memorial Hall Library is open every day except Sun- 
days and legal holidays from 9 to 12.30 in the morning, and from 
3 to 9 in the afternoon and evening. 

Any resident of Andover over ten years of age may have a 
library card upon filling out an application blank. Children in 
grades below the Punchard School are required to have their 
applications endorsed by both parent and teacher. 

All grown people are allowed to take any reasonable number 
of books, provided that only one is a seven-day book. The 
Punchard pupils are permitted to borrow two, one fiction and one 
non-fiction. 

Books are issued for fourteen days, the date upon which the 
book is due being stamped plainly on the "date due" slip at the 
time of issue. A book kept overtime incurs a fine of two cents 
for every day overdue. A few of the books most in demand are 
issued for seven days only. All these are labeled upon the book 
pocket, "Seven day book." Books lost or damaged must be 
paid for. 

Seven day books are not renewed or reserved for anyone. 
Other books may be renewed if no one else has asked for them, 
and if a work not fiction is especially desired for any serious 
purpose, notice of its return to the library will be sent on request. 

The shelves of the whole library are open to all grown people. 
The books are arranged according to subjects, and it is often 
much more satisfactory to go to the shelves and examine the 
books than to depend upon the catalogue. 

The only complete index of the contents of the library is the 
card catalogue. The printed catalogue of the books was issued 
many years ago, and is out-of-date, besides containing the names 
of many books which are no longer in the library. The new books 
are listed at intervals in the weekly paper, and cumulated in the 
yearly library report, but the only complete record is the card 

138 



catalogue. This catalogue is arranged alphabetically like a 
dictionary. To find whether any given book is in the library, 
look for it under the surname of the author, or under its title. 
The right-hand drawers of the case contain a second arrange- 
ment of cards where the books are entered according to the 
subjects of which they treat. 

The new books purchased each month are placed for some 
weeks in a special case on the north side of the reading room, so 
that the most recent additions to the library may be found 
there. The library buys only a limited amount of new fiction, 
but it tries to fill the wants of the community in regard to other 
books desired. People are invited to suggest for purchase the 
titles of books they wish. 

The library staff is always glad to answer questions or in any 
way to help visitors find what they want. 



LIST OF PERIODICALS AND NEWSPAPERS TAKEN FOR THE 
READING ROOM 

American monthly review of reviews 

Atlantic monthly 

Blackwood's magazine 

Bookman 

Book review digest 

Catholic world 

Century 

Country gentleman 

Christian Endeavor world (gift) 

Country life in America 

Cumulative book index 

Etude 

Porum 

Garden magazine (gift) 

Guide to nature (gift) 

Harper's magazine 

House beautiful (gift) 

Independent and Weekly review. 

139 



India rubber world, (gift) 

International studio (gift) 

Ladies' home journal 

Library journal 

Life 

Literary digest 

Li t tell 's living age 

London weekly Times 

Missionary review of the world 

National geographic magazine 

Nineteenth century 

North American review 

Open road 

Outing 

Outlook 

Popular mechanics 

Public libraries 

Readers' guide to periodical literature 

St. Nicholas 

School arts magazine 

Scientific American 

Scribner's magazine 

Survey 

Textile world (gift) 

Woman's Home Companion 

World's work 

Youth's companion 

Andover Townsman 

Boston Herald 

Boston Transcript 

Christian Science Monitor (gift) 

Lawrence Telegram 

New York Times 



140 



NEW BOOKS ADDED DURING 1921 



State and government documents are not listed. Duplicates, replacements 
and books for the Ballardvale Branch are also omitted. 

{Books marked with a * are Gifts.) 



PERIODICALS 

051 R32 American monthly review of reviews, v. 62, 63. 

051 A881 Atlantic monthly, v. 126, 127. 

052 B56j Blackwood's magazine, v. 208. 
051 B64 Bookman, v. 51, 52. 

051 C33 Century, v. 100, 101. 

051 F77 Forum, v. 63, 64, 65. 

716 G16 Garden magazine, v. 30, 31, 32. 

051 H23 Harper's magazine, v. 141, 142. 

705 H81 House beautiful, v. 48. 

051 138 Independent, v. 102, 103, 104. 

705 161 International studio, v. 71, 72. 

020.5 L61 Library journal, v. 45. 

051 L71 Littell's living age, v. 306, 307, 308. 
910.5 N21 National geographic magazine, v. 38, 39. 

052 N62 Nineteenth century, v. 58. 

051 N81 North American review, v. 212, 213. 

051 094 Outlook, v. 125, 126, 127. 

621 P81 Popular mechanics, v. 34, 35. 

020.5 P96 Public libraries, v. 25. 

370.5 S35 School arts magazine, v. 20. 

051 S147 St. Nicholas, v. 47, pt. 2. 

605 S416 Scientific American, v. 123, 124. 

051 S434 Scribner's magazine, v. 68, 69. 

051 W89 World's work, v. 40, 41. 

*Gifts 

ETHICAL AND RELIGIOUS BOOKS 
(Purchased chiefly from the Phillips Fund) 

230 A13w Abbott, Lyman. What Christianity means to me. 

268 B38p Beard, Frederica. Pictures in religious education. 

177.7 B73 Brandt, Lillian. How much shall I give? 

173 Clls Cabot, E. L. Seven ages of childhood. 

251 Cll Cadman, S. P. Ambassadors of God. 

268 C71 *Colson, Elizabeth. First primary book in religion. 

268 C79w Cope, H. F. The week-day church school. 

248 F78ms Fosdick, H. E. Meaning of service. 

220.9 G76 Grant, Elihu. Orient in Bible times. 

141 



232 G78 


261 G94 


136 H25 


173 H29 


131 H86 


172.4 172 


131 J13 


232.9 K41j 


150 M14 


268 M92 


131 M99 


237 R15 


174 R39 


226.3 R54 


220.9 R63 


177 S79 


231 S97 


131 W16 


352 A82 


352 B38 


347 B58 


352 B72 


331 B87 


374 C54 


351.3 E94 


396 F47 


351.7 F58 


332.7 H12 


379 H194 


351.3 H35 


364 H85 


368 H871 


368 H87p 


351.3 L57 


321 L95 


304 M 14 


374 R25d 


380 W39 


428 B29 


370.1 H78 


808 P37 


460 T27 


150 T67 


371 T85 



Graves, F. P. What did Jesus teach? 

Guild, R. B. Community programs for cooperating 

churches. 
Hartshorne, Hugh. Childhood and character. 
Haviland, M. S. Character training in childhood. 
Hudson, J. W. The truths we live by. 
*Irwin, Will. The next war. 
Jackson & Salisbury. Outwitting our nerves. 
Kent & Jenks. Jesus' principles of living. 
McDougall, William. Introduction to social psychology. 
Munkres, Alberta. Primary method in the church school. 
Myerson, Abraham. The nervous housewife. 
Randall, J. H. New light on immortality, 
Richards, Claude. Man of to-morrow. 
Robertson, A. T. Studies in Mark's gospel. 
Rogers, R. W. Great characters of the Old Testament. 
Starrett, H. E. Charm of fine manners. 
Swain, R. L. What and where is God? 
Walsh, J. J. Religion and health. 

GENERAL ECONOMICS 

* Ashley, R. L. The new civics. 
*Beard, C. A. American citizenship. 

Blakemore, A. W. Make your will. 

Bradford, E. S. Commission government in American cities. 
*Bullard, F. L. The public refuses to pay. 

Clark, T. A. Discipline and the derelict. 
*Ewart, J. A. Civil service manual. 3v. 

Filene, Catherine. Careers for women. 

Fitzpatrick, E. A. Budget making in a democracy. 

Hagerty, J. E. Mercantile credit. 

Hanifan, L. J. The community centre. 

Hecht, Solomon. Postoffice department examination 
instruction. 

Hoyt, F. C. Quicksands of youth. 
*Huebner, S. S. Life insurance. 
*Huebner, S. S. Property insurance. 

Leupp, F. E. How to prepare for a civil service exam- 
ination. 

Lowell, A. L. Greater European governments. 

McDougall, William. Is America safe for democracy? 

Reely, M. K. comp. Selected articles on disarmament. 

* Webster, W. C. General history of commerce. 

BOOKS ON EDUCATION 

Bascom, Leila. Elementary lessons in English idiom. 

Home, H. H. Teacher as artist. 

Pence, R. W. Manual of the mechanics of writing. 

Terry, T. P. Short-cut to Spanish. 

Trabue & Stockbridge. Measure your mind. 

Turner, E. A. Essentials of good teaching. 

142 



/ 
BOOKS ON SCIENCE 

540 B28 *Bartley, E. H. Text-book of medical and pharmaceu- 

tical chemistry. 

667 F29 Fay, I. W. Chemistry of the coal-tar dyes. 

523.8 043 Olcott, W. T. Field-book of the stars. 

530 S75 Spinney, L. B. Text-book of physics. 

540.3 T39 Thorpe, Sir Edward. Dictionary of applied chemistry 

2 v. 

FARM AND HOME MANAGEMENT 

Abel, M. H. Successful family life on a moderate in- 
come. 
*Curtis, R. S. Fundamentals of live-stock judging. 
Gay, C. W. Productive horse husbandry. 
Harper, M. W. Manual of farm animals. 
Head, Joseph. Everyday mouth hygiene. 
Lamon & Kinghorne. Practical poultry production. 
Lewis, H. R. Productive poultry husbandry. 
Luckiesh, Marion. Lighting the home. 
McCollum & Simmonds. American home diet. 
Martin, G. A. Make your own hats. 
Spaulding, R. H. Your dog and your cat. 
Washburn, F. L. The rabbit book. 

BUSINESS HANDBOOKS 

Adams, E. K. Women professional workers. 

Barrett, H. J. Modern methods in the office. 

Brisco, N. A. Fundamentals of salesmanship. 
*Davis & Lingham. Business English. 

Dean, E. O. Opportunities out of doors. 
*Huffcut, E. W. Elements of business law. 

Kilduff, E. J. How to choose and get a better job. 

Lewis, E. S. Getting the most out of business 

Maxwell, William. Training of a salesman. 
*Pratt, E. E. Course in foreign trade, llv. 
*Scovell, C. H. Cost accounting and burden application. 
*Spencer, M. L. News writing. 

Whitehead, Harold. Principles of salesmanship. 

MECHANICAL AND USEFUL ARTS 

Broemel, L. Sheet metal worker's manual. 

Bucher, E. E. Wireless experimenter's manual. 
*Davis R. E. Manual of surveying. 
*Hills, R. W. Machine drawing. 
*Hirshfeld & Ulbricht. Gas power. 
*Hodgson, F. T. Practical treatise on the steel square. 2v. 
*Horstmann & Tousley. Motion picture operation. 

Kuss, R. H. Steam boilers. 
*Macbeth-Evans Glass Co. Fifty years of glass-making. 

Manly, H. P. Automobile battery care. 

143 



640 A14 


636 C94 


636.7 G25 


636 H23 


613 H34 


636.5 L19 


636.5 L58 


645 L96 


641 M13 


646 M36„ 


636 S73 


636.9 W27 


396 A21 


658 B27 


659 B77 


658 D29 


174 D34 


347 H87 


174 K55 


658 L58 


659 M45t 


380 P88 


658 S44 


070 S74 


659 W58 


671 B78 


654 B85 


526 D29 


744 H55 


621.4 H61 


694 H66 


792 H78 


621.1 K96 


666 M12 


629.1 M31b 



677 N99 Nystrom, E. H. Textiles. 

629.1 P14mt Page, V. W. Modern motor truck. 

629.1 P14t Page, V. W. Model T Ford car. 

678 P31c Pearson, H. C. Crude rubber and compounding ingre- 

dients. 
678 P31r Pearson, H. C. Rubber machinery. 

694 T66 Townsend, Gilbert. Carpentry & joinery. 

678 T81 Tufford, H. H. Tires and vulcanizing. 

678 W58 Whitby, G. S. Plantation rubber and the testing of 

rubber. 
667 W61 Whittaker, C. M. Application of coal-tar dye stuffs. 

677 W88 Woolman & McGowan. Textiles. 



749 C23 

793 C76 

791 C76 
746 C81 
745 C85b 
745 C85 1 

794 D79 
793 F41 
738 H32 
796 H56 
793 H86 
796 J49 
716 K63 
793 K74 
740 L97 

792 M17 

793 M85 
715 P34 
796 R48 
740 S24 
796 V19 
796 W21 
793 W38g 



FINE ARTS 

Carrick, A. V. Collector's luck. 

Conger, M. L. Folk-story plays for children. 

Conklin, George. Ways of the circus. 

Corticelli Silk Mills. Lessons in crochet. 

Crane, Walter. Bases of design. 

Crane, Walter. Line and form. 

Draper, G. O. School, church, and home games. 

Ferris, Helen. Producing amateur entertainments. 

Hayden, Arthur. Chats on old Sheffield plate. 

Hilton, H. H. Modern golf. 

Hubbard, Eleanore. Little American history plays. 

Jessop, Elon. Motor camping book. 

Kirby, A. M. Daffodils, narcissus, and how to grow them. 

Knickerbocker, E. V. Plays for classroom interpretation. 

Lutz, E. G. Drawing made easy. 

Mclsaac, F. G. Tony Sarg marionette book. 

Moses, J. M. ed. Treasury of plays for children. 

Peets, Elbert. Practical tree repair. 

Ripley, G. S. Games for boys. 

Sargent & Miller. How children learn to draw c 

Vaile, P. A. The new golf. 

Wardlaw & Morrison. Basket-ball. 

Wolcott, T. H. Book of games and parties. 



LITERATURE, ESSAYS AND POETRY 

372.2 B15t Bailey, C. S. Tell me another story. 

822.08 B17h Baker, G. P. ed. Harvard plays; the 47 workshop. 2v. 

822.08 B17 Baker, G. P. ed. Modern American plays. 

822 B17p Baker, G. P. The Pilgrim spirit, a pageant. 

822 B27k Barrie, J. M. A kiss for Cinderella. 

824 B43h *Benson, A. C. House of quiet. 

824 B45s Bergengren, Ralph. Seven ages of man. 

843 B64c *Bordeaux, Henry. La chair et l'esprit. 

824 B796 *Broun, Hayward. Seeing things at night. 

843 B86 Buffum, D. L. ed. French short stories. 

824 C42u Chesterton, G. K. Uses of diversity. 



144 



808 C55 
808.9 D39 

016.8 G76 
824 G764 
372 H23 

808.9 K67 
827 L46a 

824 M81m 
824 M81p 
822.33 M86a 
822.33 M86t 
824 M48 - 
821 N87e 
372 035 
891 054r 
891 054t 
824 R29p 
824 S23c 

590 S42 

822.08 S53 

808.9 S61 
820.9 T85 

808.9 T97 
824 V28c 

821.08 W17 

808.9 W67 
821.08 W63 



Clark, T. A. When you write a letter. 

Deming & Bemis, comp. Pieces for every day the schools 
celebrate. 

Graham, Bessie, comp. The bookman's manual. 

Grandgent, C. H. Old and new. 

Harper, Wilhelmina, comp. Story-hour favorites. 
*Kleiser, Grenville. Humorous hits. 
*Leacock, Stephen. Arcadian adventures with the idle 

rich. 
*Morley, Christopher. Mince-pie. 
*Morley, Christopher. Pipefuls. 

Moulton, R„ G. Shakespeare as a dramatic artist. 

Moulton, R. G. Shakespeare as a dramatic thinker. 
*Newton, A. E. A magnificent farce, etc. 
*Noyes, Alfred. The elfin artist, etc. 

O'Grady & Throop, comp. Teacher's story-teller's book. 
*Omar Khayyam. The rose garden. 
*Omar Khayyam. Rubaiyat, with Persian text. 

Repplier, Agnes. Points of friction. 

Santayana, George. Character and opinion in the United 
States. 

Scoville, Samuel. Everyday adventures. 

Shea & Loving, eds. Fifty contemporary one-act plays. 
*Sindelar, J. C. ed. Lincoln Day entertainments. 

Turner & Sutherland. The development of Australian 
literature. 

Tyler, A. C. comp. Twenty-four unusual stories. 

Van Dyke, Henry. Camp-fires and guide-posts. 

Walters, L. D. O. comp. Anthology of recent poetry. 
* Williams, L. M. Up-to-the-minute monologues. 

Widdemer, Margaret. The haunted hour. 



917.12 B85 
919.4 B87 
917.44 B76 

910.4 B93 

917.5 C15 
917.94 C16 
915.69 C42 

914.5 C54 
917.44 E26 

917.29 F84 

919.6 F87 
917.3 G29 
917.3 G35 
914.2 H87. 

916.7 M33 
916.2 M33 
914.41 M85 



DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL 

Buchanan, Angus. Wild life in Canada. 
Buley, E. C. Australian life in town and country. 
"Brigham, A. P. Cape Cod and the old colony. 
Burns, W. N. Year with a whaler. 

Campbell, J. C. The southern highlander and his home. 
Canfield, C. D. ed. Diary of a forty-niner. 
Chesterton, G. K. The new Jerusalem. 
'Clark, F. E. Our fellow Italian citizens. 
Edwards, Agnes. The old coast road from Boston to 
Plymouth. 

Franck, H. A. Roaming through the West Indies. 
Freeman, L. R. In the tracks of the trades. 
George, W. L. Hail Columbia! 
Gibbs, Philip. People of destiny. 
Huish, M. B. American pilgrim's way in England. 
'Marcosson, I. F. An African adventure. 
: Margoliouth, D. S. Cairo, Jerusalem and Damascus, 
Mosher, A. M. Spell of Brittany. 



145 



910.4 P16 Paine, R. D. Lost ships and lonely seas. 

914.2 P23 Parks, Leighton. English ways and by-ways. 

917.3 R34t Rhodes, Harrison. American towns and people. 
917.41 S98 Sylvester, H. M. Maine pioneer settlements. 5v. 

919.4 T21 Taylor, Griffith. Australia. 

917.47 T66 Towns, C. H. Loafing down Long Island. 

917.44 W24 Warner, F. L. Pilgrim trails. 

919.4 W88 Woollcombe, H. S. Beneath the southern cross. 



92 A366 
92 A843 
92 B441 
92 B634 
92 R566b 
92 C213 
92 S513c 

92 F947 
92 L633d 
92 N161f 
92 E87f 
92 T585g 
92 J237 
92 H769 
92 L923k 
92 C723 
92 R324m 
92 M856 
92 P195 
92 R674ro 
920 S91 
92 V667s 
92 W699t 
920 W67w 



BIOGRAPHY 

Aldrich, L. W. Crowding memories. 

Asquith, Margot. Autobiography. 

Benson, E. F. Our family affairs. 

Bok, Edward. Americanization of Edward Bok. 

Burgess, W. H. John Robinson, the pastor of the Pilgrims. 

Carnegie, Andrew. Autobiography. 

Chamberlain, N. H. Samuel Sewall and the world he 
lived in. 

Clark, J. S. Life and letters of John Fiske. 2v. 

Drinkwater, John. Lincoln the world emancipator. 
*Fisher, Herbert. Napoleon. 

Memoirs of the Empress Eugenie. 2v. 
Reminiscences of Tolstoi. 
Letters. 2v. y 

Herbert Hoover. 
*Knox, W. F. The court of a saint. (Louis IX). 

Menzies, Lucy. St. Columba of Iona. 

Moses, Belle. Paul Revere. 

Moton, R. R. Finding a way out. 

Pannunzio, C. M. Soul of an immigrant. 

Robinson, C. R. My brother, Theodore Roosevelt. 

Strachey, Lytton. Eminent Victorians. 

Strachey, Lytton. Queen Victoria. 
*Tumulty, J. P. Woodrow Wilson as I know him. 

Williams, B. C. Our short story writers. 



*Fleury, Maurice. 
Gorky, Maxim. 
James, William. 
Kellogg, Vernon. 



HISTORY 

974 A21 Adams, J. T. Founding of New England. 

940 A82 Ashley, R. L. Early European civilization. 

913.42 A92 Ault, Norman. Life in ancient Britain. 

940.91 B43 *Benwell, H. A. History of the Yankee Division. 

930 B74 Breasted, James. Ancient times. 

974 B76 Bridgman, H. A. New England in the life of the world. 

942 C88 Cross, A. L. History of New England and Greater Britain. 

944 D29 Davis, W. S. History of France. 

937 D58r Dill, Samuel. Roman society in the last century of the 

western empire. 

940.91 D58 *Dillon, E. J. Inside story of the peace conference. 

942 D63o Ditchfield, P. H. Old village life. 

973 F55 Fite, E. D. History of the United States. 



146 



940.91 F71 Folks, Homer. Human costs of the war. 

973 F76 Forman, S. E. Advanced American history. 

973 H31 Haworth, P. L. The United States in our own time. 

940.91 H326 Hayes, C. J. H. Brief history of the Great War. 

940.91 H81 *House, E. M. ed. What really happened at Paris. 

974.46 H83 Howe, M. A. deW. Boston Common. 

940.91 L29 *Lansing, Robert. The peace negotiations. 

923.2 M67 Mirrors of Downing street. 

974.4 M82 Morison, S. E. Maritime history of Massachusetts. 

973 M98 Muzzey, D. S. An American history. 

940 R56r Robinson, J. H. ed. Readings in European history. 2v. 

940.91 T17 *Tardieu, Andre. The truth about the treaty. 

940.91 T21 *Taylor, E. G. New England in France, 1917-1919. 

940 W39 Webster, Hutton. Historical source book. 

900 W46 Wells, H. G. Outline of history. 

904 W45 Wells, H. G. Salvaging of civilization. 

973 W52 West, W. M. ed. Source book in American history. 



Ashford, Daisy. 
Bailey, Temple. 
Banning, Margaret. 
Bassett, S. W. 
Bindloss, Harold. 
Bindloss, Harold. 
Bindloss, Harold. 
Bindloss, Harold. 
Bosher, K. L. 
Bottome, Phyllis. 
Brown, Alice. 
Brown, E. A. 
Brownell, A. M. 
Bryant, Marguerite. 
Buckrose, Mrs. J. E. 
Chamberlain, G. A. 
Comstock, H. T. 
Connolly, J. B. 
Cooper, H. St. J. 
Crabb, Arthur 
Curwood, J. C. 
Curwood, J. C. 
Dawson, Coningsby. 
Day, Holman. 
Deland, Margaret 
Douglas, O. E. 
Farnol, Jeffery. 
Favre de Coulevain, 
Fenger, F. A. 
Fisher, D. C. 
Fletcher, J. S. 
Foote, J. T. 



Mile 



FICTION 

Her book. 

The trumpeter swan. 

Half loaves. 

Flood tide. 

The intriguers. 

Thurston of Orchard Valley. 

Vane of the timberlands. 

The wilderness mine. 

Kitty Canary. 

The crystal heart. 

Home-spun and gold. 

Journey's end. 

The thankful Spicers. 

A courageous marriage. 

Young hearts. 
Through stained glass. 

Shield of silence. 
*The trawler. 

Sunny Ducrow. 

Ghosts. 

The flaming forest. 

Valley of silent men. 

Kingdom round the corner. 

When Egypt went broke. 
*Promises of Alice. 

Penny plain. 
*Black Bartlemy's treasure. 

*Wonderful romance. 

The golden parrot. 

The brimming cup. 

The Chestermarcke instinct. 

Dumb-bell of Brookfield. 



147 



Fox, John, Jr. 
Gatlin, Dana. 
Gill more, I. H. 
Grey, Zane. 
Grey, Zane. 
Grey, Zane. 
Grimshaw, Beatrice. 
Haggard, H. R. 
Hannay, J. O. 
Hannay, J. O. 
Hawes, C. B. 
Hawes, C. B. 
Hawkins, A. H. 
Hay, Ian. 
Hay, James. 
Hbrkova, S. B. tr. 
Henry, O. 
Holding, Elisabeth. 
Hutchinson, A. S. M. 
Kelland, C. B. 
King, Basil. 
Lee, Jeanette. 
Lewis, Sinclair. 
Lincoln, J. C. 
Livingston, F. B. 
Locke, W. J. 
Lutz, G. L. H. 
Lutz, G. L. H. 
Macaulay, Rose. 
McCutcheon, G. B. 
McFarland, Raymond. 
McFee, William. 
MacGrath, Harold. 
Mackenzie, Compton. 
Mantle, Beatrice. 
Marshall, Archibald. 
Maxwell, W. B. 
Miller, A. D. 
Montgomery, L. M. 
Morley, Christopher. 
Munro, Neil. 
Mulder, Arnold. 
Mulford, C. E. 
Niven, Frederick. 
Onions, Oliver. 
Onions, Mrs. Oliver. 
Ostrander, Isabel. 
Overton, Grant. 
Poole, Ernest. 
Putnam, N. W. 
Reynolds, Mrs. Baillie. 
Rice, A. H. 



Erskine Dale, pioneer. 

Missy. 

Out of the air. 

Desert of wheat. 
*The last trail. 

Mysterious rider. 

The terrible island. 

The ancient Allan. 

Adventurers of the night. 

Our casualty. 

The great quest. 

The mutineers. 

Lucinda. 

The willing horse. 

The Melwood mystery. 

*Czechoslovak stories. 
*Options. 

Invincible Minnie. 

If winter comes. 

Youth challenges. 

The empty sack. 

The other Susan. 

Free air. 

Galusha the magnificent. 

The custard cup. 

The mountebank. 

Cloudy jewel. 

The tryst. 

Potterism. 

Quill's window. 

Sons of the sea. 

Captain Macedoine's daughter. 

Pagan madonna. 

Rich relatives. 

In the house of another. 

The hall and the grange. 
*In cotton wool. 

Manslaughter. 

Rilla of Ingleside. 

Kathleen. 
*Bud. b 

The sand doctor. 

Johnny Nelson. < 

Tale that is told. 

Case in camera. 

Sweet stranger. 
*Twenty-six clues. 

World without end. 
*Blind. 

It pays to smije. 

Also ran. 

Quin. 

148 



Richards, C. E. 
Rideout, H. M. 
Rinehart, M. R. 
Rinehart, M. R. 
Rinehart, M. R. 
Rohmer, Sax. 
Sidgwick, Ethel. 
Sime, J. G. 
Sinclair, B. W. 
Singmaster, Elsie. 
Smith, H. L. 
Snaith, J. C. 
Snaith, J. C. 
Somerville & Ross. 
Somerville & Ross. 
Stannard, Mrs. Arthur. 
Sterrett, F. R. 
Tarkington, Booth. 
Walpole, Hugh. 
Walpole, Hugh. 
Watts, M. S. 
Wharton, Edith. 
White, S. E. 
White, S. E. 
Williams, Valentine. 
Williams, W. W. 
Willsie, Honore. 
Wilson, H. L. 



A tenderfoot bride. 

Fernseed. 

Poor wise man. 

More Tish. 
*Sight unseen, the Confession. 
*Green eyes of Bast. 

Madam. 

Our little life. 

Poor man's rock. 

Ellen Levis. 

Agatha's aunt. 

The adventurous lady. 

Council of seven. 

Some experiences of an Irish R. M. 

Further experiences of an Irish R. M, 

The truth-tellers. 

Nancy goes to town. 

Alice Adams. 

The captives. 

The young enchanted. 

The noon-mark. 

Age of innocence. 

Claim jumpers. 

Rose dawn. 

*Okewood of the secret service. 

Goshen street. 

The enchanted canyon. 

The wrong twin. 



CHILDREN'S BOOKS — NON-FICTION 

808 B15m Bailey, C. S. Merry tales. 

92 L633ba Baldwin, James. Abraham Lincoln. 

656 B19 Baldwin & Livengood. Sailing the seas. 

793 B26 Barnum, M. D. Harper's book of little plays. 

973 B38h Beard & Bagley. History of the American people. 

918 B67 Bowman, Isaiah. South America. 

292 B85 Buckley, E. F. Children of the dawn. 

940.91 B91 Burke, Kathleen. Little heroes of France. 

973 C64m Coe, F. E. Makers of the nation. 

914.15 C71 Colum, Padraic. Boy in Eirinn. 

656 C88 Crump, Irving. Boys' book of railroads. 

914.97 D28 Davies, E. C. Boy in Serbia. 

973 D54 Dickson, M. S. American history. 

398.4 D65 * Dodge, Louis. Everychild. 

973 E93 Evans, L. B. America first. 

920 F22m Faris, J. T. Makers of our history. 

808 F94 Fryer, J. E. Stories of everyday friends. 

352 F94h Fryer, J. E. Stories of everydav heroes. 

352 F94w Fryer, J. E. Stories of everyday wonders. 

917.3 F95 Fultz, F. M. Out-of-door studies in geography. 2v. 

796 G44c *Girl Scouts. Campward ho ! 

973 G65c Gordy, W. F. Colonial days. 

149 



973 G65sl 
940.5 Hll 
938 Hll 
937 Hll 

940.1 Hll 
550 H31 

920.7 H78 
540 J42 
910 J61 
571 L26 

973.2 M15 
808.9 M22 
942 M34 
793 N87 
598.2 P27 
973.2 P92 
793 R37 

92 W274ri 

920.7 S64 

917.8 W56 
797 Y27 



Adams, Katherine. 
Ames, J. B. 
Ashmun, Margaret. 
Bassett, S. W. 
Bassett, S. W. 
Brown, A. F. 
Brown, E. A. 
Dyer, W. A. 
Gardner, E. W. 
Gilchrist, B. B. 
Gray, Joslyn. 
Heyliger, William. 
Holland, R. S. 
Irwin, I. H. 
Judson, C. I. 
Lisle, Clifton. 
Lofting, Hugh. 
Meader, S. W. 
Meigs, Cornelia 
Morris, Cora, comp. 
Newberry, Perry. 
Perkins, L. F. 
Phillips, E. C. 
Price, E. B. 
Schultz, J. W. 
Turner, Nancy. 
Wallace, Dillon. 
Wheeler, F. Rolt. 



Gordy, W. F. Stories of later American history. 
Haaren & Poland. Famous men of modern times. 
Haaren & Poland. Famous men of Greece. 
Haaren & Poland. Famous men of Rome. 
Haaren & Poland. Famous men of the middle ages. 
Hawksworth, Hallam. Strange adventures of a 

pebble. 
Horton, Edith. Group of famous women. 
Jenks, Tudor. Chemistry for young people. 
Johonnot, James. Geographical reader. 
Langford, George. Pic the weapon-maker. 
MacElroy, M. H. Work and play in colonial days. 
Macleod, Mary. Book of ballad stories. 
Marks, Jeannette. Children in the woods stories. 
Noyes & Ray. Little plays. 
Patteson, S. L. How to have bird neighbors. 
Prescott, D. R. Day in a colonial home. 
Rich, G. E. When Mother lets us make paper 

box furniture. 
Rideing, W. H. George Washington. 
Smith, E. S. ed. Heroines of history and legend. 
Wheeler, F. Rolt. Book of cowboys. 
Yates, R. F. Boy's book of model boats. 

STORIES FOR CHILDREN 

Midsummer. 
Torrance from Texas. 
Isabel Carleton at home. 
Paul and the printing press. 
Steve and the steam engine. 
Round Robin. 
The silver bear. 
Sons of liberty. 
Dena. 

Kit, Pat and a few boys. 
Bouncing Bet. 
High Benton-worker. 
Blackbeard's island 
Maida's little house. 
Camp at Gravel Point. 
Diamond rock. 
Story of Dr. Dolittle. 
The black buccaneer. 
The windy hill. 
Stories always new. 
Castaway island. 
The Puritan twins. 
Black-eyed Susan. 
Happy venture. 
In the great Apache forest. 
Zodiac town. 
Ragged inlet guards. 
Boy with the U. S. secret service. 
150 



REPORT OF CUSTODIAN 
JOHN CORNELL ART GALLERY 



To the Trustees of the Memorial Hall Library. 

Gentlemen: I herewith submit the report of the gallery for 
the twelve months ended December 31, 1921. 

The gallery was opened the first of May. At the October 
meeting of the trustees it was voted that the gallery should be 
opened Saturday afternoons during the winter months. 

The attendance for the year was 239. Of this number 81 
were adults, and 158 children, — an increase over that of 1920, 
when the record stood 63 adults and 119 children. 

The interest of the children has been about equally divided 
between the pictures and the stereographs. If views of the 
latter could be obtained showing birds in color they would be 
of much value to the children. Possibly some one in town may 
have just such views and would be glad to donate them to the 
gallery. 

The addition of a screen has been a useful feature. Through 
this medium it has been possible to exhibit a variety of pictures, 
including choice bits of architecture, picturesque scenes in and 
near France; also reproductions of the work of famous English 
artists, such as Reynolds, Gainsborough, and Romney. 

A most welcome gift of a set of world-renowned cathedrals,, 
eight in number, all photogravures, and most of them large, 
has recently been received from Mr. Virgil G. Harrington. 
These beautiful reproductions will be a source of pleasure to^ 
many visitors during the coming years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ABBIE S. DAVIS 

Custodian 

151 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



TWENTY- FIRST ANNUAL 
REPORT 



OF THE 



Board of Public Works 



EMBRACING THE THIRTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF 
WATER COMMISSIONERS AND TWENTY- 
FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF 
SEWER COMMISSIONERS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1921 



ANDOVER, MASS. 

THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1922 



'JOHN H. FLINT 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

1889—1899 

*JAMES P. BUTTERFIELD 
*FELIX G. HAYNES 



1893 



SEWER COMMISSIONERS 
1894 1894—1899 



*WM. S. JENKINS 
*JOHN L. SMITH 
CHARLES E. ABBOTT 

BOARD OF 

1899—1902 

*JOHN H. FLINT 
*WM. S. JENKINS 
*JOHN L. SMITH 
*JAMES P. BUTTERFIELD 
♦FELIX G. HAYNES 

1906—1907 

♦FELIX G. HAYNES 
*JOHN W. BELL, Treas. 
JAMES C. SAWYER, Sec'y 
*LEWIS T. HARDY 
*HARRY M. EAMES 

1908—1912 

*LEWIS T. HARDY 
♦JOHN W. BELL, Treas. 
JAMES C. SAWYER, Sec'y 
ANDREW McTERNEN 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS 

1914—1916 

THOS. E. RHODES ('19) 
BARNETT ROGERS ('16) 
*LEWIS T. HARDY ('16) 
ANDREW McTERNEN, Sec'y ('18) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas. ('18) 

1917—1918 

BARNETT ROGERS ('19) 
THOS. E. RHODES ('20) 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('18) 
CHAS. B. BALDWIN, Sec'y ('19) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas. ('18) 

1919—1920—1921 

BARNETT ROGERS ('22) ARTHUR T. BOUTWELL ( 

WILLIAM D. McINTYRE ('21) PHILIP L. HARDY Sec'y (' 

THOS. E. RHODES, Treas. ('23) 

SUPERINTENDENT 

FRANK L. COLE 
* Deceased. 



*WM. S. JENKINS 
*JOHN L. SMITH 
*JOHN E. SMITH 

PUBLIC WORKS 

1903—1906 

*JOHN L. SMITH 
♦FELIX G. HAYNES 
*JOHN W. BELL 
*LEWIS T. HARDY 
JAMES C. SAWYER 

1907—1908 

♦FELIX G. HAYNES 
♦JOHN W. BELL, Treas. 
JAMES C. SAWYER, Sec'y 
♦LEWIS T. HARDY 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

1913—1914 

♦LEWIS T. HARDY ('16) 
BARNETT ROGERS ('16) \ 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('15) 
THOS. E. RHODES, Sec'y ('14) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas.(15) 

1916—1917 

BARNETT ROGERS ('19) 
THOS. E. RHODES ('17) 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('18) 
CHAS. B. BALDWIN, Sec'y ('19) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS,Treas.('18) 

1918—1919 

BARNETT ROGERS ('22) 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('21) 
PHILIP L. HARDY ('21) 
CHAS. B. BALDWIN, Sec'y'('22) 
THOS. E. RHODES, Treas. '('20) 



'22) 
21) 






REPORT OF 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



To the Citizens of the Town of Andover, Mass. 

Your Board of Public Works herewith submits its annual re- 
port for the year ending December 31, 1921. 

This is the ninth annual report of the Board under its reorgani- 
zation and includes the thirty-third annual report of the water 
system, the twenty-fifth of the sewer system and the ninth of the 
Highway and Park Departments, since they have been under the 
jurisdiction of the Board of Public Works. 

Organization 

Mr. William Mclntyre and Philip L. Hardy were reelected to 
the Board for a term of three years. 

The Board met on March 14, 1921 and organized as follows: 

Chairman, Barnett Rogers. 

Treasurer, Thomas E. Rhodes. 

Secretary, Philip L. Hardy. 

Mr. Frank L. Cole was appointed as Superintendent and George 
Dick as his assistant. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

During the past year there was one extension made to the water 
system which the Town voted to install at the last annual Town 
meeting. This extension was made on Ballard vale Road, a 6" 
pipe being laid a' distance of 927 feet on which there is but one 
water consumer. There have been some extensions made in 
Shawsheen Village but the cost of these has been borne by the 
owners of the property. 

The appropriations for maintenance and construction were 
spent in the usual manner, that is the former was used for running 

3 



expenses of the system, repairs, etc., and the latter appropriation 
was used for the installation of new service pipes and meters. 

In view of the fact that the Board is recommending an issue of 
bonds, which if accepted at the Town meeting will incur an ex- 
pense to the Town this year, the amount of which can not be 
determined at this time, as it depends upon the time at which the 
work is carried out and the cost of same, which two factors will 
determine the interest charges which will be payable the ensuing 
year; and also in consideration of the extensive work being 
carried on ±n Shawsheen Village relative to the water system, the 
expense and income of which is difficult to estimate, the Board 
thought it wise to defer putting into operation the system of 
accounting recommended last year and is accordingly making its 
recommendations in the usual way and hereby recommend an 
appropriation of $20,000.00 for maintenance and the sum of 
$2000.00 for new construction for the use of the water department 
for 1922. 

The Board also recommends that the Town issue bonds to the 
amount of $40,000.00 for use of the water department. 

The reason we ask for these bonds is that it is imperative that 
the 6" main from the West Andover Church to High Street be 
replaced with a much larger main. At present this 6" main is 
entirely inadequate and under certain conditions a very serious 
situation might result. The cost of this work is estimated at 
approximately $35,000.00. The remaining $5,000.00 is to be 
used to make the necessary changes in the water system, such as 
the installation of an electrical unit at the Haggetts Pond Station 
which we feel would be necessary in the very near future. 

The Water Bonded Debt 

The bonded debt of the water system January 1, 1921 was 
$115,000.00. During the past year there has been paid from the 
Town Treasury $8,000.00, leaving a bonded debt on this system 
January 1, 1922 of $107,000.00. 

Of this indebtedness $40,000.00 is redeemable by the sinking 
fund which on January 1, 1922 amounted to $35,333.23. 

The sum of $750.00 should be appropriated for the sinking 
fund for the year 1922. 

4 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 

At the last annual Town meeting it was voted to install a 
sewer main on Poor and Main Streets, and also on Haverhill 
Street, and this work has been completed. This work on Poor 
and Main Streets was done by the Board and the Haverhill St. 
job was let out by contract for the sum of $9186.08 plus $8.60 a 
yard for ledgework. 

On account of the large amount of ledgework, and the increased 
length of the Haverhill Street job, It will be necessary to ask for 
an appropriation of $5748.08 to pay for the extra cost of this 
work. The total cost being $14,493.87 and the amount appro- 
priated was $8750.00, leaving a balance of $4.21. 

The sewer on Lowell Street which the Town, at a special meet- 
ing voted to construct is about one third complete. Work was 
stopped on this job on account of weather conditions, but it will 
be completed as soon as the weather permits. 

In compliance with a vote at the last Annual meeting, author- 
izing the Board to secure plans and estimates for the disposal of 
the town sewage, other than by filter beds, such plans and esti- 
mates have been received. The plan most practical and efficient 
is the one that takes the sewage direct to the Merrimac River. 
This plan has the endorsement of the Engineers of the State 
Board of Health and will cost approximately $200,000.00. We 
recommend this plan. 

Appropriation, March 1921 $1000.00 

Approved bill 850.00 



Balance $ 150.00 

If this plan is carried out the present filter beds will be done 
away with and of course this land will become a considerable asset 
to the Town. If the plan is not adopted by the Town it will mean 
the expenditure of about $100,000.00 to enlarge the present filter 
beds, upon which the State Board of Health will insist, as the 
present beds are much too small to care for the increasing sewage. 

The Board recommends the usual appropriation of $3000.00 
for maintenance of the sewer Department for the ensuing year. 



The Sewer Bonded Debt 

The bonded debt of the sewer system January 1, 1921 was 
$120,000.00. During the year 1921 $7000.00 was paid from the 
Town Treasury on this indebtedness leaving the total indebted- 
ness of the system on January 1, 1922, $113,000.00. 

Of this amount $30,000.00 is redeemable by the sinking fund 
which on January 1, 1922 amounted to $21,042.05. 

The sum of $1000.00 should be appropriated for the sinking 
fund for the year 1922. 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

During the past year we have built a considerable amount of 
cinder roads in the outlying parts of the Town as this method of 
caring for these roads seems to be very satisfactory. 

There has been a Tarvia Road built on Summer Street from 
Elm to Pine and also on Andover Street from residence of Joseph 
Stanley to the school house hill in Ballardvale. A detailed ac- 
count of the yardage and cost of these jobs will be found in the 
Superintendent's report. 

The tarvia roads already built and which required blanketing 
were, as is customary, g ; ven a coat of tar and sand to maintain 
them in as good condition as possible. 

Extensive repairs were found to be necessary on the Shawsheen 
Bridge in Ballardvale and also the Stevens Street Bridge at a 
cost of about $3000.00. 

For the ensuing year the Board recommends the appropriation 
of $60,000.00 for use of Highway Department, $30,000.00 of this 
for new construction and $30,000.00 for maintenance. 

The Main Street Highway from the square to Chapel Ave. is 
i'n very bad shape particularly on the west side. The large amounl 
of traffic which this road is called upon to serve, demands thai 
this be rebuilt of a more permanent type of construction than has 
been the case in the past. According to advice received by the 
Board it seems that if this work be undertaken immediately ii 
can be done at a less cost than if deferred, and as the road is ii 
very bad condition we recommend that the Town authorize th< 
expenditure of $100,000.00 to complete this work the ensuing year. 



Snow Removal 
The sum of $1834.00 was spent last year for the removal of 
snow and the Board has included in its appropriation for Highway 
maintenance the sum of $2,000.00 to care for this work the ensu- 
ing year. 

Sidewalks 

There have been several sidewalks constructed under the 
Betterment Act during the past year of which a detailed statement 
will be found in the Superintendent's report. 

Lowell Street 

The construction of Lowell Street was completed during the 
past year. 

We now have a Tarvia road from Shawsheen Village to the 
Tewksbury line and it is our hope that the State will take this 
road over and maintain it as one of its state Highways. The 
total cost of this job since the work was started in 1915 until the 
completion of same last year, amounted to $117,670.83. The 
Town bore only one-third of this expense, the remaining two- 
thirds being paid by the State and County in equal proportions. 
To give an idea of the increasing cost of carrying on work during 
the past few years, it is interesting to note the prices per yard of 
constructing this road since 1915. In 1915 the cost per yard 
amounted to $1.07. In 1916 this jumped to $1.36. In 1917, $1.62; 
in 1918, $2.24; in 1919, $2.20; in 1920, $3.10; and in 1921, $3.28. 

Park Department 

The sum of $1200.00 is recommended for care of the Park for 
the ensuing year. 

Signed, 

BARNETT ROGERS 
PHILIP L. HARDY 
THOMAS E. RHODES 
WILLIAM D. McINTYRE 
ARTHUR T. BOUTWELL 



REDEMPTION OF BONDS 



Dr. 

To redeem Water Loan No. 2 due 1922 

No. 3 " 1923 

No. 4 " 1925 

No. 5 " 1928 

Water Sinking Fund 

Cr. 

Balance Jan. 1, 1921 $33026. 14 

Appropriation March 1921 750 . 00 

Interest on deposits 1557.09 



$10000.00 

10000.00 

15000.00 

5000.00 



$35333.23 



Water Loan Deposits 



Andover National Bank 
Andover Savings Bank 

Dr. 
To redeem Sewer Bonds Due 1928 



$24795.83 
10537.40 



$35333.23 
$30000.00 



Sewer Sinking Fund 
Cr. 



Balance Jan 1, 1921 
Appropriation March 1921 
Interest on deposits 

Balance Jan. 1, 1922 



$19170.35 

1000.00 

871.70 



$21042.05 
$21042.05 



Sewer Loan Deposits 

Andover National Bank Book No. 2 $21042 . 05 

Note: In addition to the above bonds we have $67000.00 
Serial Water Bonds and $83000.00 Serial Sewer Bonds. 

Examined, W. H. Coleman \ Auditors 
J. S. Robertson J 



The Water Bonded Debt 

The Bonded Debt of the Water System January 1, 1921 was 
$115000.00. 

During the year 1921 there has been paid out, out of the Town 
Treasury $8000.00; leaving a bonded debt on this system Jan- 
uary 1, 1922 of $107000.00. Of this indebtedness $40000.00 is 
redeemable by the Sinking Fund, which on January 1, 1922 
amounted to $35333.23. 

The sum of $750.00 should be appropriated for the Sinking 
Fund for the year 1922. 

The Sewer Bonded Debt 

The Bonded Debt of the Sewer System January 1, 1921 was 
$120000.00. 

During the year 1921 $7000.00 was paid from the Town Treas- 
ury on this indebtedness, making the total indebtedness on 
January 1, 1922, $113000.00. Of this amount $30000.00 is re- 
deemable by the Sinking Fund which on January 1, 1922 amount- 
ed to $21042.05. 

The sum of $1000.00 should be asked for the Sinking Fund for 
the year 1922. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



To the Board of Public Works: — 

Gentlemen : — I submit the following report of the Public 
Works Department for the year ending December 31, 1921, 
making the Thirty-third of the Water System, Twenty-fifth of 
the Sewer System, and the Ninth of the Highways and Park De- 
partments, with a brief summary of work performed in each de- 
partment. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

This year there has been added to our pipe system 927 feet of 
6" C. I. pipe, as voted at our Annual Meeting in March. There 
were also two Fire Hydrants and 3-6" gates used on the Ballard 
Vale Road job. This work cost $1594.49 or $1.72 per foot. There 
has also been added in Shawsheen Village and divided as follows: 



Southerland street 
Warwick street 
Windsor street 
Kensington street 
York street 
Argyle street 
Balmoral street 
Riverinsa road 
Sterling street 
Dunbarton street 
Canterbury street 
Ballard vale road 
Previously reported 



Total 





HYDRANTS 


232 


1 


497 





291 





197 





1490 


2 


702 


1 


643 


1 


140 





625 


1 


277 


1 


563 


1 


927 


2 


270283 


378 


276867 




52.44 miles 


388 



10 



making the system, December 31st, 1921, 52.44 miles of pipe, 
38S hydrants. There were two connections made for fire Lines, 
these being 6" and both lines were metered, one going to Boiler 
House, and the other to New Mill. There were many more con- 
nections made and more to be made, which will mean in the near 
future that a 10" main must be laid from our large main at 
West Andover, down Lowell street, across Main and up Haver- 
hill street to High street, a distance of 10,560 feet. This would 
cost with necessary hydrants and gates, changing over from 
our 6" to the new 10" at present prices, about $34,000. It is 
necessary that this be done at once, as the Fire Underwriters 
have already recommended the same. 

Pumping Station number 1 at Haggetts Pond has been oper- 
ated during 1921, 365 days, using our steam plant 305 and our oil 
engine 60 days. We pumped 219,173,467 gallons of water and 
the pumping time 3,587 hrs. 45 min., making 600,475 gallons 
as a daily average. 

The station on Bancroft road has given good results. This sta- 
tion has been run by electricity with the exception of about ten 
days, when power was off. We then used our oil engine, which 
is in very good condition. This plant is only operated about 
thirty hours a week. 

During the summer, the Fire Underwriters were here and made 
some tests; pressures were taken and many recommendations 
were made. Some of these have been attended to and some 
will be impossible to carry out without a great deal of money 
being expended. The pressures taken were at the following 
places. 

Andover Square 73 

Park street 70 

Summer and Avon streets 59 

Maple and Walnut avenue 80 

Lowell street at Main 118 

Main and Union streets 110 

Harding and Main streets 108 

Pearson and Main streets 80 

Essex street near B. & M. RR. 120 

11 



Lowell street and High Plain road 75 

Argilla road and Andover street 125 

Andover and Centre streets, Ballardvale 114 

Ballardvale road and Main street 90 

Holt and Stinson roads 55 

Salem street 78 

Highland road 55 

Bartlet street and Chapel avenue 70 

Main, School and Phillips streets 30 

School and Abbot streets 75 

During the year we were called on account of twenty leaks, 
nine of these were joints partly blown; two for split pipes; and 
the remaining nine being on service pipe. One bad break, just 
outside our pumping station split a 14" Y and it was im- 
possible to get one anywhere in stock, so we made a temporary 
hitch and ordered a special one. This job is one that has both- 
ered a good deal and probably now we will have no more 
trouble from the same. 

Receipts for Water, 1919, $23,864.58 Gals, pumped 218,279,797 
* " " " 1920, 31,416.47 " " 254,727,887 

" 1921, 28,013.36 " " 219,173,467 

* Received from Lawrence $5,093.20; pumped 27,216,675 gallons. 

I would recommend the following sums for the year 1922. 

For maintenance 

Salaries and labor $11,000.00 

Coal 3,000.00 

Fuel oil 500.00 

Engine and cylinder 700.00 

Power No. 2 station 1,400.00 

Horse and car 600.00 

Miscellaneous 1,000.00 

Measuring device 1,000.00 

To start improvement on grounds 800.00 



$20,000.00 



12 



and for a 10" C. I. Main from the West Church down Lowell 
Street across Main Street up Haverhill to High Street, at a cost 
of about $34,000.00. Bonds should be issued for $40,000.00 as 
there is other work coming right along and we have no money for 
extensions. 

Service Pipe 

We received sixty-one applications, and laid sixty-three during 
1921, making 1657 now in use, or a distance of 130,144 feet. 102 
meters, varying in sizes from 5-8 to 6" were set and I would re- 
commend the same appropriation for 1922, i.e. $2000.00. 



Receipts for 1921 



For service pipes and meters 
Water Rates 

Town Treasurer, Water Rates 
Pipe account 



$28013.36 
9568.51 



$ 9568.51 
28013.36 



$37581.87 $37581.87 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 



Maintenance 

Only regular work, such as taking care of the Filter Beds, re- 
pairing stoppage, cleaning and flushing, was done this past year; 
for which I would recommend for the year 1922 the sum of 
$3000.00. 

House Connections 

Six applications were received for House connections. These 
were all laid, making a total of 762 now in use. 

Common Sewers 

The appropriation for Poor and Main Streets at last Town 
Meeting was $3500.00. 

1620 feet of 8" sewer was laid with necessary manholes for the 
sum of $2714.22, balance of $785.78. 

13 



Lowell Street work was started but owing to weather condition! 
was stopped until spring. 

Appropriation at Special Town Meeting $5000 . 0( 

Bills approved to Jan 1st. 3053 . 71 



Bal. $1946.2: 

Haverhill Street Sewer 

Appropriated, March 1921 $8,750.0( 

Bids were asked for this work and the successful bid 
der was Mr. Joseph McCarthy, the bid being $9186.08. 

Rock work $8.60 per yard extra. The town furnished all pipe 
brick and manhole rings and covers. A great amount of rock wai 
uncovered and it will be necessary to have $5748.08 appropriatioi 
in 1922 to pay for work already done under this contract. With 
out this the sewer would have been of no benefit to the thirty o: 
forty odd houses above the Boston & Maine underpass. 

Approved bills to Jan. 1st $8745. 79 leaving a balance of $4.2; 
with $5748.08 more to pay for work already done and contrac 
completed. 



14 



SUMMARY COST OF CONSTRUCTION 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



Designation 


Approved 
Bills 


Credits 


Net Cost 
1921 


Total 


ffice fixtures 

elemeters 

elephones 

earns 

ipe Distribution .... 

srvice Pipe 

/ater and Land .... 
action pipe . . 

eservoir 

oal Shed 

rrading Land 

/orkshop 

uildings at Pumping Station . 
umping plants .... 

onstruction Ex 

ools ........ 

Iaintenance . . . . . 


$ 

2319.21 
6583.44 

22713.52 
22.03 


$ 
4600.98 

4968.13 


$ 

2319.21 
1982.46 

17745.39 
22.03 


$ 561.75 

1311.63 

184.77 

583.65 

256724.23 

34258.10 

6687 . 23 

1309.46 

16985.82 

806.97 

1739.12 

1271.88 

9610.14 

47983.54 

9406.21 

3593.14 




$31638.20 


$9559.11 


$22069.09 


$393007.58 



SUMMARY COST OF CONSTRUCTION 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 



>ewer Main in|feet . 
slumber of Filter Beds . 
dumber of Sludge Beds 
oost to Abutters ' . 
^ost to Town 



54164 



28 
3 



$124519.78 

$187522.95 



54164 



31 



$312042.73 




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HIGHWAYS AND PARKS 



To the Board of Public Works: — 

Gentlemen: — I submit for your approval the Ninth annual 
report of the Highway Department for the year ending December 
31st, 1921. During January, February and March, we were 
sanding sidewalks, shoveling gutters and plowing, keeping catch 
basins opened. The snow cost this year was only $1834.12 
including the sand used on sidewalks the entire year, together 
with repairs on old plow and one new one, made by John L. Mor- 
rison. We now have ten plows and nine routes, which in any 
ordinary storm may be covered in four hours. When the frost 
was out of the ground we started cleaning up the streets and clear- 
ing out all catch basins. On completion of this we started patch- 
ing up our Tarvia Roads and the blanketing of same, which when 
we completed on May 10th, we started construction work on 
Lowell Street May 11th and completed this on August 18th, 1921. 
On August 19th we started Summer Street, finishing September 
22d. On Sept. 26th we started Andover Street to B. Vale and 
completed this Nov. 14th. Since then we have been patching, up 
gravel roads, cleaning catch basin, sanding sidewalks and general 
work. We also helped clean up brush, resulting from the Ice 
Storm, using three of our men and our team, to aid the Tree 
warden for about two weeks. 

Blanketing of Streets 

During the year 1921, 39,405 gallons of tarvia was used for this 

work, at a cost of $5910.75. Sand used for this work cost $1587.29. 

The cost of blanketing was kept this year on several different 

streets and found to be including patching, about .04J^ per yard. 

Bridges 
It was necessary to put in new timbers and replank the Stevens 
Street Bridge this year. The work was done by Mr. Charles- 

20 









Torrey and cost $711.77. The Ballard Vale Bridge on Andover 
Street had to be all new timbered and planked ; bids were asked 
for this and Mr. Torrey was awarded the job which cost $1590.00. 
I would say the Town furnished the paint for both of these 
bridges which were given two coats of asphalten paint, made 
especially for bridge work. 

The Central Street Bridge is in a very dangerous condition, the 
trusses are about ready to fall and the timbers are in very bad 
shape. There should be a new Cement bridge built there at once. 

Sidewalks 

During the past year there was set Six hundred and forty-three 
feet of curbing, four hundred and eight yards granolithic walk on 
Main Street from Stevens Street to the Shawsheen River Bridge, 
at a cost of $2236.84. Tar sidewalks were built on School, Locke, 
Punchard Avenue and Summer Streets. Gutters were patched 
on School and High Streets and Maple Avenue, and a great many 
driveways, either made new or patched, so that automobiles 
could get in and out. 

Construction 

Construction work was started on Lowell Street on May 11th 
and completed August the 18th. During that time we completed 
4549 feet of 18 foot road or 9098 square yards. There was con- 
siderable filling on this piece which made the cost higher than 
piece previously done. The total cost of the job was $29875.39. 
The table of cost will be found in the Expenditure sheet, which in- 
cludes $1100.00 for bills on the 1920 work. 

Summer Street was then taken up on August 19th and when 
finished on September 22d we had completed 5531 yards of road 
with necessary catch basin and piping. The cost of this work 
was $9372.90 or about $1.69 per yard. 

Andover Street was started on September 26th and completed 
the 14th of November. During that time we built 7472 yards of 
Tarvia road with necessary pipes for draining at a cost of $9985.73 
or about $1.34 per yard. 

21 



Ballard Vale District 

Only necessary repairs have been done in Mr. Haggerty's sec- 
tion this year, costing for teams and labor $2489.76. 

Ashes have been put on Woburn Street, Haggetts Pond Road, 
Bailey, River and Highland Roads, and Stinson Street. Many 
hundred loads have been scattered on the different streets through- 
out the town; some three or four loads and on others more. The 
cost of this work for the year was $7000.00. 

Recommendations : 



Maintenance 


Labor and teams 


$11000.00 


Tarvia B. and Sand 


4000.00 


Sid walks 


3000.00 


Gravel and ashes 


6000.00 


Snow 


2000.00 


Drain 


1000.00 


Keeping team and car 


1000.00 


Miscellaneous 


1000.00 


Bridges 


1000.00 




$30000.00 



I have made a careful study of Phillips Street, measuring the 
same and find that it will take about 3400 feet of curbing and 
7200 square yards of road to be built from Main to Central Streets, 
at an estimated cost of $19,500 . 00. Abbot Street between School 
and Phillips Streets, should be built at the same time which will 
mean about 3120 yards at a cost of $6500.00. The balance of our 
construction money should be spent on Essex Street, below the 
Boston and Maine R. R. crossing up Shawsheen Road toward the 
West Church, this would be to Stevens St., about $8000.00. River 
Road will have to be scarified and shaped up and a blanket coat. 
I would recommend $30000.00 for new work. 



22 



PARK DEPARTMENT 



During the year 1921 only the necessary work was done on the 
park, such as taking care of the lawns, walks and shrubbery. 

The athletic field had its usual care together with the boulders 
on Ridge Street. 



Appropriation March 1921 
Expenditures 



Same appropriation will be necessary in 1922. 



$1200.00 
1213.74 

13.74 
$1200.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Appropriation, March 1921 



Highway department, 


maint. 




$30000.00 


Highway department, 


const. 




30000.00 


Lowell Street 






5000.00 


County, Lowell Street 






9958.46 


State, Lowell Street 






9958.46 


Credits 


• 




4650.12 


Expenditures 








Maintenance 




$29091.89 




Construction 




25200.34 




Lowell Street 

Snow 

Tools 




29875.39 
1871.37 

223.55 




Bridges 




2301-77 




Drain 




906.08 


1 



Balance 



$89470.39 
96.65 



$89567.04 $89567.04 



23 



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Bridges 
Drains 


105.00 

85.55 

174.55 


Side- 
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Snow 


$1577.52 
7.00 

254.35 


13 a) 

IS 


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$7796.09 

2272.75 

58.32 

61.35 

1743.28 

14.90 

18.02 
588.00 
255.43 

41.85 
1033.50 
1740.20 
4141.37 

596.00 

24.64 

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.97 


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$11238.14 
592.71 

27.60 
90.09 
31.16 

96.20 
3106.00 
1877.60 

53.96 

109.55 
2337.43 
6119.54 

376.13 

34.75 
212.27 

1.21 


Names. 




















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Pay Rolls Labor and 1 
Boston and Maine . 
B. L. McDonald Co. 
Anderson and Bowmar 
E. P. Hall . . . 
Gray and Kendall . 
Arden Trustees . 
H. J. Stanchfield . 
W. I. Morse . . 
J. Brady . . . 
Pacific Mills . . 
R. L. Buchan . . ' 
Highway Dept. 
Etalio Belmessino 
J. E. Pitman 
John McDonough 
Barrett Mfg. Co. . 
Essex Trap Rock 
Porter Livingston . 
Joseph Vohn 
Hariz Motor Co. . 
John L. Morrison . 
John Shea . 
Dillon Mch, Co. . 
B. and L. Ex. 






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TOWN OF ANDOVER 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Receipts and Expenditures 




FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1922 



ANDOVER, MASS. 

THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1923 



CONTENTS 



Almshouse Expenses 


63 


Memorial Day 


56 


New Almshouse 


65 


Memorial Hall Library 


56, 130 


Relief out of 


66 


Military Aid 


64 


Aiding Mothers 


66 


Miscellaneous 


60 


Andover Post No. 8 


58 


Moth Superintendent's Report 


70 


Animal Inspector 


75 


Moth Suppression 


51 


Appropriations, 1922 


18 


Notes Given 


58 


Art Gallery 


152 


Notes Paid 


58 


Assessors' Report 


68 


Overseers of the Poor 


62 


Assets 


99 


Police 


48,71 


Auditors' Report 


102 


Printing and Stationery 


50 


Board of Health 


49,88 


Punchard Free School, Report 


of 


Board of Public Works 


Appendix 


Trustees 


103 


Sewer Sinking Funds 


55 


Retirement of Veterans 


57 


Water Sinking Funds 


55 


Schedule of Town Property 


77 


Bonds, Redemption of 


58 


Schools 


40 


Brush Fires 


47 


Selectmen's Report 


40 


Building Inspector's Report 


76 


Soldiers' Memorial 


59 


Collector's Account 


85 


Soldiers' Relief 


64 


Cornell Fund 


86 


Spring Grove Cemetery 


52,73 


County Tax 


55 


State Aid 


64 


Dog Tax 


56 


State and Highway Tax 


55 


Dump, Care of 


57 


Street Lighting 


54 


Fire Department 


46, 87 


Tax Collector 


84 


Finance Committee 


121 


Town House 


44 


G. A. R. Post 99 


56 


Town Meeting 


13 


Hay Scales 


54 


Town Meetings, special 27 


, 31, 36 


Insurance 


54 


Town Officers 


4,42 


Interest 


57 


Town Warrant 


117 


Jury List 


81 


Treasurer's Report 


94 


Liabilities 


94 


Tree Warden 


51,69 


Librarian's Report 


135 


War Memorial Committee 


106 



TOWN OFFICERS 1922 



Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor 



WALTER S. DONALD, Chairman 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN, Secretary 

Assessors 
WALTER S. DONALD, Chairman 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN, Secretary 

Town Clerk 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Town Treasurer 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Tax Collector 
WILLIAM B. CHEEVER 

School Committee 
FREDERICK E. CHEEVER 
EDWARD C. CONROY 
ALFRED E. STEARNS 
EVERETT C. HILTON 
MARY W. FRENCH 
DAVID R. LAWSON 
ROY H. BRADFORD 
DOUGLAS G. CRAWFORD 
W. DUDLEY YATES 

Superintendent of Schools 
HENRY C. SANBORN 



Term expires 1923 
" 1924 
" 1925 



Term expires 1925 
" 1924 

11 1925 



Term expires 


1923 


n n 


1923 


n << 


1923 


it a 


1924 


u u 


1924 


it it 


1924 


it (( 


1925 


it it 


1925 


a n 


1925 



Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund Commission 
THOMAS E. RHODES Term expires 1923 



PHILIP L. HARDY 
WILLIAM D. McINTYRE 
ARTHUR T. BOUTWELL 
EDWARD SHATTUCK 



1924 
1924 
1925 
1925 



Superintendent of Water, Sewer Department, Highways and Parks 
FRANK L. COLE 



Engineers of Fire Department 
CHARLES F. EMERSON, Chief 

LLEWELLYN D. POMEROY, Clerk 
HARRY E. WELLS 



Board of Health 
BANCROFT T. HAYNES 
FRANKLIN H. STACEY 
CHARLES E. ABBOTT, M.D. 

Chief of Police 
FRANK M. SMITH 



Term expires 1923 
" 1924 
" 1925 



Constables 



GEORGE W. MEARS 
FRANK M. SMITH 
GEORGE N. SPARKS 



Term expires 1923 
" 1923 
" 1923 



Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 
ALFRED E. STEARNS Term expires 1923 



BURTON S. FLAGG 

E. KENDALL JENKINS 

REV. FREDERICK A. WILSON 

FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 

NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 

*CHARLES U. BELL 



1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 



Trustees of Punchard Free School — Terms expire 1925 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL JOHN H. CAMPION 

MYRON E. GUTTERSON HARRY H. NOYES 

EDMOND E. HAMMOND 

Auditors 

JOHN S. ROBERTSON WALTER H. COLEMAN 

HARRY SELLARS 

* Deceased. 

5 



Trustees of Cornell Fund 

JOHN C. ANGUS Term expires 1923 

DR. WILLIAM D. WALKER " " 1924 

CHARLES N. MARLAND " " 1925 

Superintendent of Moth Department 
EDWARD H. BERRY 

Tree Warden 
EDWARD H. BERRY 

Moderator of Town Meetings 
ALFRED L. RIPLEY 

Registrars of Voters 
SAMUEL P. HULME JOHN F. HURLEY 

PATRICK J. SCOTT GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Clerk 

Trustees Spring Grove Cemetery 
WALTER I. MORSE DANIEL H. POOR 

FRED E. CHEEVER WARREN L. JOHNSON 

EVERETT M. LUNDGREN DAVID R. LAWSON 

JOHN W. STARK 

Street Lighting Committee 
WALTER H. COLEMAN HENRY J. GARDNER 

FREDERIC G. MOORE JOSEPH L. BURNS 

FRED G. CHENEY 

Finance Committee 
HENRYA.BODWELL, Chairman GEORGE ABBOT 
JOHN C. ANGUS, Secretary CHESTER W. HOLLAND 

EDWARD V. FRENCH GEORGE H. WINSLOW 

GEORGE L. AVERILL 



TOWN WARRANT 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ss. : To either of the Constables of the Town of An- 
dover: Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to 
vote in elections and in town affairs to meet and assemble at the 
Town House in voting Precinct One and the Old School House 
Ballard Vale in voting Precinct Two, in said Andover, on 
Monday, the sixth day of March, 1922, at 6 o'clock a.m., 
to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To elect a Moderator for one year, Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for one 
year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, one 
member of the Board of Assessors for three years, three members 
of the School Committee for three years, Five Trustees of Punch- 
ard Free School for three years, two members of the Board of 
Public Works for three years, one member of the Board of Health 
for three years, three Auditors of accounts for one year, three 
Constables for one year, one Trustee of Memorial Hall Library 
for seven years, one Tree Warden for one year and all town 
officers required by law to be elected by ballot. Also to take 
action on the following question, Shall licenses be granted for the 
sale of certain non-intoxicating beverages in this town? 

All to be voted for on one ballot. The polls will be open from 
6 o'clock a.m. to 5 o'clock p.m. 

After final action on the preceding article one, the said meet- 
ing shall stand adjourned by virtue of Section 20, Chapter 39 of 
the General Laws to Monday March 13th, at 1.30 o'clock p.m. 
at the Town Hall, then and there to act upon the following 
Articles, namely: 



Article 2. — To elect all other officers not required by law 
to be elected by ballot. 

Article 3. — To determine what sums of money shall be ap- 
propriated for Almshouse Expenses, Relief out of Almshouse, 
Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children, Board of Health, 
Brush Fires, Fire Department, Hay Scales, Highway Department, 
Insurance, Interest, Memorial Hall Library, Memorial Day, 
Post 99, G. A. R., Miscellaneous, Parks and Playsteads, Police, 
Printing and Stationery, Public Dump, Retirement of Veterans, 
Redemption of Water, Sewer, High School, and Shawsheen Bridge 
Bonds, Schools, Sewer Maintenance, Sewer Sinking Funds, 
Soldiers' Relief, Spring Grove Cemetery, State Aid, Street Light- 
ing, Town Officers, Town House, Tree Warden, Moth Depart- 
ment, Water Maintenance, Construction and Sinking Funds, 
and other town charges and expenses. 

Article 4. — To see if the town will approve the recommenda- 
tion of the Board of Public Works and vote to reconstruct the 
highway on Main Street from Chapel Avenue to Andover Square, 
with macadam pavement or other road material in accordance 
with plans and specifications prepared by the State Department 
of Public Works, Division of Highways. Also to see if the town 
will vote that said work of reconstruction be done by contract 
under the supervision of the Board of Public Works at an ex- 
pense not to exceed $100,000. Also to see if the town will vote 
that notes or bonds of the town be issued to raise funds for the 
payment of work undertaken under this article, payable annually 
in the years 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926 and 1927, in conformity with 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws. 

Article 5. — To see if the Town will authorize and direct the 
Board of Public Works to petition the legislature for authority 
to issue bonds or notes, outside the statutory limit to the amount 
of $40,000. to be denominated on the face thereof "Andover 
Water Loan, Act of 1922", said loan to be for the purpose of 
making necessary changes in and extending the present system 
of water works in the town of Andover under such terms and 



conditions as the General Court may provide, on petition of the 
Board of Public Works. 

Article 6. — To see if the town will authorize and direct the 
Board of Public Works to petition the Legislature for authority 
to borrow $200,000. outside the statutory limit of indebtedness, 
by bond issue or otherwise, for the following purposes: To con- 
struct and maintain a pipe line, in accordance with plans ap- 
proved by the State Board of Health, for the purpose of disposing 
of the sewage of the Town of Andover, said pipe line to extend 
from Andover through the City of Lawrence to the Merrimack 
River, and to authorize the purchase or taking of land In said 
Andover and Lawrence necessary for said site and to award and 
pay damages for said purchases or takings. On petition of the 
Board of Public Woiks. 

Article 7 . — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$15,000.00 as their share of the cost in the reconstruction of 
Main street by the State, through Shawsheen Village on petition 
of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 8. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$5,748.08 to pay the balance due on Haverhill Street Sewer on 
petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 9. — To hear the report of the committee on housing 
the inmates of the Town Farm and to see if the town will appro- 
priate the sum of $10,000. in addition to the $30,000. now on 
hand, received from the sale of the Town Farm property, for the 
purpose of erecting a new building and other necessary expenses. 

[Article 10. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
Three thousand ($3000) dollars to purchase the property in 
Whittier Court, adjacent to the PI ay stead, known as the Cun- 
ningham property, and consisting of approximately one (1) acre 
of land with the buildings thereon, on petition of Frederic S. Bout- 
well and others. 



Article 11. — To see if the town will authorize the Selectmen 
and the School Committee to serve as a joint committee to select 
a suitable lot of land for municipal or town purposes in the district 
known as Shawsheen Village. If the land that may be selected 
cannot be acquired by purchase, to authorize the Selectmen on 
behalf of the town to exercise the right of taking by eminent 
domain, awarding damages for land that may be taken, and 
making a report of their action at a special town meeting to be 
called not later than April 15, 1922, with a recommendation for 
an appropriation to cover the award and for such further action 
as may be necessary, on petition of the School Committee. 

Article 12. — To hear and act upon the report of the War 
Memorial Committee. 

Article 13. — To see if the town will, for the purpose of pro- 
viding a suitable headquarters for a post of the American Legion, 
approve the leasing of a building or part of a building which 
shall be under the direction and control of such post subject to 
such regulations as the town may adopt, and to see if the town 
will appropriate for the current year the sum of not more than 
$1500 therefor, as provided for in General Laws, Chapter 40, 
Section 9, on petition of the War Memorial Committee. 

Article 14. — To see if the town will adopt changes in the vot- 
ing precincts of the town as recommended by the Selectmen in 
a statement filed with the Town Clerk in accordance with the 
provisions of Section 7, Chapter 54 of the General Laws. 

Article 15. — To see if the Town will accept the provisions of 
Sections 42, 43 and 44 of Chapter 48 of the General Laws relating 
to the establishment of a fire department under the control of an 
officer to be known as the Chief of the Fire Department. 

Article 16. — To see if the town will accept as a town way, as 
laid out by the Selectmen, the street now known as Magnolia 
Avenue extending from the junction of Corbett Street and Poor 
Street, and running northerly 1148 feet and 39 feet in width to 
land now owned by James Mulligan, on petition of James Mul- 
ligan and others. 

10 



Article 17. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$150. for the purpose of engraving into the Pilgrim Memorial 
Monument at Provincetown the name of the Town of Andover 
and the year of its incorporation, on petition of John H. Soehrens 
and others. 

Article 18. — To hear and act on the report of the committee 
appointed to consider the matter of a representative town meeting 
for the Town of Andover. 

Article 19. — To fix the pay of the call firemen for the ensuing 
year. 

Article 20. — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 21. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in anticipation of the revenue of the 
current financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

Article 22. — To determine what disposition shall be made of 
unexpended appropriations. 

Article 23. — To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

Article 24. — To determine the amount of money to be raised 
by taxation the ensuing year. 

Article 25. — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof, seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your do- 
ings thereon, at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this twenty- third day of February, A.D. 
1922. 

WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Selectmen of Andover 
11 



Andover, March 6th, 1922 
Essex, ss. 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants 
of said town to meet at the time and places and for the purposes 
stated in said warrant by posting a true and attested copy of the 
same on the Town House, on each schoolhouse and in no less 
than five other public places, where bills and notices are usually 
posted, and by publication in the Andover Townsman. Said 
warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

FRANK M. SMITH, 

Constable 



12 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 6, 1922 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to vote in town affairs convened in Precincts One and 
Two in said Andover on Monday the Sixth day of March 1922, at 
six o'clock in the forenoon, agreeably to the requirements of the 
foregoing warrant, took up Article One and proceeded to vote for 
Town Officers and on the License question. 

The ballot boxes were found to be empty and registered 0000. 
The polls opened at 6 o'clock a.m. and closed at 5 o'clock p.m. 
The total number of ballots cast was 2306. Viz: Precinct One- 
2024, Precinct Two 282. 

The result of the balloting was as follows : 
Moderator — One year: 
Precincts 
1 2 

1507 183 Alfred L. Ripley 1690 

517 99 Blanks 616 

Town Clerk — One year : 

1571 207 George A. Higgins 1778 

453 75 Blanks 528 

Town Treasurer — One Year : 

1533 195 George A. Higgins 1728 

491 87 Blanks 578 



Selectmen — Three Years : 



280 


54 


Cora E. Abbott 


368 


54 


Martin Doherty 


1056 


143 


Andrew McTernen 


74 


2 


Timothy J. O'Sullivan, Jr. 


189 


20 


Thomas E. Rhodes 


57 


9 


Blanks 



334 

422 

1199 

76 
209 

66 



13 



266 


60 


Cora E. Abbott 


343 


46 


Martin Doherty 


1027 


138 


Andrew McTernen 


75 




Timothy J. O'Sullivan, Jr. 


201 


19 


Thomas E. Rhodes 


112 


19 


Blanks 



Assessor — Three Years : 

326 
389 
1165 
75 
220 
131 

Collector of Taxes — One Year: 

1561 210 William B. Cheever 1771 

463 72 Blanks 535 

School Committee — Three Years : 

1250 152 Roy H. Bradford 1402 

1322 136 Douglas G. Crawford 1458 

818 108 Horace D. Wood 926 

1006 78 W. Dudley Yates 1084 

1676 372 Blanks 2048 

Trustees Punchard Free School — Three Years: 

1399 173 Frederic S. Boutwell 1572 

1291 151 John H. Campion 1442 

1346 151 Myron E. Gutterson 1497 

1288 162 Edmond E. Hammond 1450 

1291 145 Harry H. Noyes 1436 

3505 628 Blanks 4133 

Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund Commission 
Three years : 

980 53 Arthur T. Boutwell 1033 

586 255 Edward P. Hall 841 

796 65 Barnett Rogers 861 

901 78 Edward Shattuck 979 

785 113 Blanks 898 

Board of Health — Three Years: 

1544 201 Charles E. Abbott 1745 

480 81 Blanks 561 

14 



Auditors of Accounts — One Year : 

1367 162 Walter H. Coleman 1529 
1448 164 John S. Robertson 1612 
1384 148 Harry Sellars 1532 
1873 372 Blanks 2245 

Constables — One Year: 

1300 152 George W. Mears 1452 

1392 159 Frank M. Smith 1551 

1368 214 George N. Sparks 1582 
2012 321 Blanks 2333 

Trustee of Memorial Hall Library — Seven Years: 

1478 169 Charles U. Bell 1647 

546 113 Blanks 659 

Tree Warden — One Year: 

976 129 Edward H. Berry 1105 

326 35 William M. Ross 361 

586 76 Robert A. Stack 662 

136 42 Blanks 178 

Shall Licenses be granted for the sale of certain Non-Intoxicating 
Beverages in this town? 

667 88 Yes 755 

909 115 No 1024 

448 79 Blanks 527 

All the foregoing officers and questions were voted on by ballot 
and the check lists were used. 



REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT ONE 

Andover, March 6th, 1922 
Polls opened at 6 a.m. and closed at 5 p.m. Ballot box regis- 
tered at opening 0000. Ballot box registered when closed 2022. 
Number of ballots cast 2024, including both male and female. 
Number of male votes cast 1254, number of female votes cast 
767. Number of ballots received 2954. Number of ballots re- 
turned 930. 

MARK M. KEANE, Clerk 

15 



REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT TWO 

Ballardvale, March 6, 1922 

Polls opened at 6 o'clock a.m. Clester Matthews in charge. 
Polls closed at 5 o'clock p.m. Ballot box registered at opening 
0000. Ballot box registered when polls closed 282. Number of 
ballots received 400. Number of ballots cast 282, number of 
ballots returned 118. Constable George N. Sparks on duty. 

JOSEPH P. LYNCH, Clerk 

After final action on Article One, the said meeting was ad- 
journed by virtue of Section 20, Chapter 39 of the General Laws, 
to Monday, March 13th, at 1.30 o'clock p.m. at the Town Hall. 

1.30 O'CLOCK P.M. MONDAY, MARCH 13TH, 1922. 
The Moderator declared : 
Alfred L. Ripley elected Moderator for one year. 
George A. Higgins elected Town Clerk for one year. 
George A. Higgins elected Town Treasurer for one year. 
Andrew McTernen elected Selectman for three years. 
Andrew McTernen elected Assessor for three years. 
William B. Cheever elected Collector of Taxes for one year. 
Roy H. Bradford elected School Committee for three years. 
Douglas G. Crawford elected School Committee for three years. 
W. Dudley Yates elected School Committee for three years. 

Frederic S. Boutwell elected Trustee Punchard Free School 
for three years. 

John H. Campion elected Trustee Punchard Free School for 
three years. 

Myron E. Gutterson elected Trustee Punchard Free School for 
three years. 

Edmond E. Hammond elected Trustee Punchard Free School 
for three years. 

16 



Harry H. Noyes elected Trustee Punchard Free School for 
three years. 

Arthur T. Boutwell elected Board of Public Works and Sinking 
Fund Commission for three years. 

Edward Shattuck elected Board of Public Works and Sinking 
Fund Commission for three years. 

Charles E. Abbott elected Board of Health for three years. 

Walter H. Coleman elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

John S. Robertson elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

Harry Sellars elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

Charles U. Bell elected Trustee of Memorial Hall Library for 
seven years. 

Edward H. Berry elected Tree Warden for one year. 

Before proceeding with Article 2, the Moderator with the 
consent of the meeting paid tribute to the late George H. Poor 
and the following resolutions presented by Hon. John N. Cole 
were unanimously adopted by a rising vote : 

The citizens of Andover, assembled in annual town meeting, 
desire to make acknowledgment of the long and honorable 
service to Andover activities rendered by the late George H. 
Poor. 

For more than a half century, his wise counsel and effective 
leadership contributed to the town's best progress. For a 
quarter century, he directed the town's affairs as moderator of its 
public meetings, presiding impartially, counselling wisely and 
directing unselfishly. 

Resolved : That the town has richly benefited by the service of 
this distinguished son, and hereby records its high appreciation of 
the part he long played in its life. 

Took up Article 2: and chose 

Seven Trustees Spring Grove Cemetery, for three years: 
Walter I. Morse, Fred E. Cheever, John W. Stark, Daniel H. 
Poor, Warren L. Johnson, David R. Lawson, Everett M. Lund- 
gren. 

17 



Chose Trustee of Cornell Fund for three years: C. Northey 

Marland. 

i 

Chose Street Lighting Committee for one year (appointed by 
Moderator): Walter H. Coleman, Fred G. Cheney, Henry J. 
Gardner, Joseph L. Burns, Frederic G. Moore. 

Chose Finance Committee for one year (appointed by Modera- 
tor) : George Abbot, Henry A Bodwell, Edward V. French, 
Chester W. Holland, George H. Winslow, John C. Angus, George 
L. Averill. 

Took up Article 3. 

Voted to appropriate the following stated sums of money : 



Almshouse 


$ 6000.00 


Almshouse, Relief Out of 


5000.00 


Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children 


2500.00 


Board of Health 


3300.00 


Brush Fires 


600.00 


Election and Registration 


1000.00 


Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital 


2700.00 


Fire Department (with receipts) 


23000.00 


Hay Scales 


125.00 


Highway Department 


60000.00 


Maintenance 


30000.00 


New Construction 


30000.00 


Interest 


14000.00 


Insurance 


5500.00 


Fire 


3000.00 


Workmen's Compensation 


2500.00 


Library 


3000.00 


Memorial Day 


550.00 


G. A. R. Post 99 


100.00 


Miscellaneous 


1200.00 


Parks and Playsteads 


1200.00 


Police Department 


11000.00 


(It being understood extra money appropriated be ex- 


pended for an additional traffic officer instead of atruck) 


Amount carried forward 


$20,627.00 



18 



Amount brought forward 


$20,627.00 


Printing and Stationery 


2000.00 


Public Dump 


75.00 


Retirement of Veterans 


300.00 


Retirement of Bonds 


15500.00 


Sewer 


7000.00 


High School 


6000.00 


Haverhill St. Bridge 


2500.00 


Schools 


103420.00 


Sewer Department 


4000.00 


Labor and power 


3000.00 


Sinking Fund 


1000.00 


Soldiers' Relief 


1500.00 


Spring Grove Cemetery (with receipts) 


2500.00 


State Aid 


1000.00 


Street Lighting 


8200.00 


Town Officers 


10000.00 


Town House 


3000.00 


Tree Warden and Moth Work 


12900.00 


Water Department (and Water Rates) 


6750.00 


Lowell Street Sewer 


5000.00 


Article 7 — (Main St.) 


15000.00 


Article 8 — (Haverhill St. Sewer) 


5748.08 


Article 9 — (Town House) 


10000.00 


Article 10 — (Cunningham Property) 


3000.00 


Article 13 — (American Legion) 


1500.00 


Article 17 — (Pilgrim Memorial) 


150.00 




$352318.08 


State Tax and Highway Tax (estimate) 


32000.00 


County Tax (estimate) 


20000.00 




$404318.08 



Took up Article 4. 

Voted, at 4.29 p.m., That the town reconstruct the highway 
on Main Street from Chapel Avenue to Andover Square with 
macadam pavement or other road material in accordance with 

19 



plans and specifications prepared by the State Department of 
Public Works, Division of Highways, and that said work of 
reconstruction be done by contract under the supervision of the 
Board of Public Works at an expense not to exceed $100,000.00. 
That for the purpose of reconstructing said highway the Town 
Treasurer is hereby authorized to issue and sell bonds or notes of 
the town to an amount not exceeding $100,000. to raise funds for 
the payment of work undertaken under this article, to be dated 
August 1, 1922, and payable $20,000. annually in the years 1923, 
1924, 1925, 1926 and 1927 in conformity with Chapter 44 of the 
General Laws, bearing interest at a rate not exceeding five (5) 
per cent per annum payable semi-annually. Said bonds or notes 
shall be denominated on the face thereof "Andover Highway 
Loan 1922," shall be signed by the Treasurer and counter- 
signed by a majority of the Selectmen and be under the seal of 
the town. Principal and interest of said bonds or notes shall be 
payable at such bank or trust company as the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, shall elect. Said bonds or notes may 
be sold at public or private sale at not less than their par value 
and shall be certified by a bank or trust company to be selected 
by the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen and con- 
tain such other statements and facts not inconsistent with this 
vote and in conformity with Chapter 44 of the General Laws. 
The vote stood 348 for and 4 against. 

Took up Article 5. 

Voted, at 4.38 p.m., That the Town authorize and direct the 
Board of Public Works to petition the legislature for authority 
to issue bonds or notes, outside the statutory limit to the amount 
of $40,000. to be denominated on the face thereof "Andover 
Water Loan, Act of 1922," said loan to be for the purpose of 
making necessary changes in and extending the present system of 
waterworks in the town of Andover under such terms and con- 
ditions as the General Court may provide. 

Took up Article 6. 

Voted at 4.45 p.m., That action on this article be postponed 
until the next town meeting. 

20 



Took up Article 7. 

Voted, at 4.47 p.m., That the town appropriate the sum of 
$15,000. as its share of the cost in the reconstruction of Main 
Street by the State, through Shawsheen Village. 

Took up Article 8. 

Voted, at 4.48 p.m., That the town appropriate the sum of 
$5748.08 to pay the balance due on Haverhill Street. 

Took up Article 9. 

Voted, at 5.23 p.m. After hearing the report of the committee 
on housing the inmates of the Town Farm it was voted to appro- 
priate the sum of $10,000. in addition to the $30,000. novv on 
hand, received from the sale of the Town Farm property, for the 
purpose of erecting a new building and other necessary expenses. 

Took up Article 10. 

Voted, at 5.25 p.m., To appropriate the sum of three thous- 
and ($3000.) dollars to purchase the property in Whittier Court, 
adjacent to the Plays tead, known as the Cunningham property, 
and consisting of approximately one (1) acre of land with the 
buildings thereon. 

Also that the town express its appreciation and thanks to those 
public-spirited citizens, who wisely acquired the above property, 
and then disregarding any desire or opportunity for profit, turned 
it over to the town at the purchase price. 

Took up Article 11. 

Voted, at 5.55 p.m., That the town authorize the Selectmen 
and the School Committee to serve as a joint committee to 
select a suitable lot of land for municipal or town purposes in the 
district known as Shawsheen Village and make a report of their 
action at a special town meeting to be called not later than 
April 15, 1922, with a recommendation for an appropriation and 
for such further action as may be necessary. 

Voted, at 5.58 p.m., To adjourn the meeting until 7.30 p.m. 

Took up Article 12. 

Voted, at 7.45 p.m., That the War Memorial Committee be 
continued on same conditions as before. 

21 



Took up Article 13. 

Voted, at 7.47 p.m., That the town for the purpose of pro- 
viding a suitable headquarters for a post of the American Legion, 
approve the leasing of a building or part of a building which shall 
be under the direction and control of such post subject to such 
regulations as the town may adopt, and that the town appropriate 
for the current year the sum of $1500. therefor, as provided for in 
General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 9. 

Took up Article 14. 

Voted, at 7.50 p.m., That the town adopt changes in the 
voting precincts of the town as recommended by the Selectmen in 
the following statement filed with the Town Clerk. 

VOTING PRECINCTS 

Selectmen's Refort 

In accordance with the vote of the town at a Special Meeting 
November 1st, 1921, that the Selectmen be requested to consider 
the need of establishing additional voting precincts, we have made 
changes in the present precincts in accordance with Section 7, 
Chapter 54 of the General Laws, and have divided the town into 
four (4) precincts and defined the limits and boundaries thereof as 
follows: 

Precinct Two: 

Beginning at a point in the centre of Lowell Street where the 
same intersects the Tewksbury line and running thence along the 
centre line of said Lowell Street in an easterly direction to a point 
where Bellevue Road enters Lowell Street; thence continuing in 
the same direction easterly to a point about 300 ft. south of 
Lowell Street; thence in a straight line northeasterly to a point 
in Argilla Road ; said point being about 400 ft. southerly from 
Lowell Street; thence easterly in a straight line to a point where 
Argilla Road enters Andover Street; thence in a southerly 
direction to a point where Porter Road enters Abbot Street; thence 
in a southeasterly direction to Ballardvale Road at a point about 
800 ft. westerly from Sunset Rock Road; thence southerly in a 

22 



straight line to a point in Woburn Street where the Wilmington 
Line crosses the same; thence westerly and southerly following 
the Wilmington line to the Tewksbury line; thence westerly, 
northerly and westerly following the Tewksbury line to the point 
of beginning. 

Precinct Three: 

Beginning at a point on Lowell Street where the Tewksbury 
line crosses the same at the northwesterly corner of Precinct 
Two; thence northwesterly along the Tewskbury line to the 
Merrimack River; thence following the Merrimack River in a 
general northeasterly direction to the Lawrence line; thence 
southerly along the Lawrence line to a corner; thence easterly 
along the Lawrence line to the Shawsheen River; thence follow- 
ing the Lawrence line and the North Andover line to a stone 
bound in Haverhill Street; thence southerly to a point in High 
Street where Burnham Road enters the same; thence westerly in 
a straight line to Stimpson's Bridge where Main Street crosses 
the Shawsheen River; thence in a southwesterly direction in a 
straight line to a point on Lincoln Street about 250 ft. southerly 
from Lowell Street; thence southwesterly to a point in Shaw- 
sheen Road about 300 ft. easterly from point where said Shaw- 
sheen Road enters Lowell Street; thence southerly to the north- 
westerly corner of Precinct Two; thence southwesterly and 
westerly following the northerly line of Precinct Two to point of 
beginning. 

Precinct Four: 

Beginning at a point in Woburn Street where the Wilmington 
line crosses the same at the southeasterly corner of Precinct 
Two; thence northeasterly and northerly along the easterly line 
of Precinct Two to a point in Andover Street where Argilla Road 
enters the same; thence northeasterly along Andover Street to a 
point where Central Street enters the same near Hartwell 
Abbott's Bridge; thence easterly and northerly along the 
centre of Central Street to School Street; thence along the 
centre of School Street to a point where Morton Street enters the 
same; thence easterly along the centre line of Morton Street to 

23 



the angle in the Street; thence continuing in the same direction 
to a point 250 ft. easterly from the house owned by Larkin; 
thence northeasterly in a straight line to a stone bound in High- 
land Road at the North Andover line; thence southeasterly 
following the North Andover line to the North Reading line; 
thence westerly and northwesterly following the North Reading 
and Wilmington lines to point of beginning. 

Precinct One: 

Bounded on the north by Precinct Three, on the south by 
Precinct Four, on the east by the town of North Andover, and on 
the west by Precinct Two. 

There are 2070 legal voters in Precinct One, 427 in Precinct 
Two, 473 in Precinct Three and 521 in Precinct Four. 

WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Selectmen of A ndover 
Received and filed, February 25th, 1922 

Attest: 

GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Town Clerk 
Took up Article 15. 
Voted, at 8.39 p.m., That article be stricken from the warrant. 

Took up Article 16. 

Voted, at 8.42 p.m., That the town accept as a town way, as 
laid out by the Selectmen, the street now known as Magnolia 
Avenue extending from the junction of Corbett Street and Poor 
Street, and running northerly 1148 feet and 39 feet in width to 
land now owned by James Mulligan. 

Took up Article 17. 

Voted, at 8.48 p.m., That the town appropriate the sum of 
$150. for the purpose of engraving into the Pilgrim Memorial 
Monument at Provincetown the name of the Town of Andover 
and the year of its incorporation. 

24 



Took up Article 18. 

Voted, at 9.09 p.m., That the report be accepted and the 
committee asked to continue their services and report at Annual 
Town Meeting. 

Took up Article 19. 

Voted at 9.17 p.m., That the pay of the call firemen be fixed 
at $125.00 per year and no one be employed as call fireman who 
is not at least 20 hours per day in town. 

Took up Article 20. 

Voted, at 9.19 p.m., That the taxes be colected by the Col- 
lector, that he receive a salary of $1800.00 per year and that 
interest be charged at the rate of 6 per cent per annum from 
October 15th on all taxes remaining unpaid after November 1st. 

Took up Article 21. 

Voted, at 9.20 p.m., That the Town Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning January 1st, 1922, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable within one year, any debt or debts 
incurred under this vote to be paid from the revenue of said 
financial year. 

Took up Article 22. 

Voted, at 9.21 p.m., That all unexpended appropriations be 
turned into the treasury. 

Took up Article 23. 

Voted, at 9.23 p.m., That the report of the Town Officers be 
accepted. 

Took up Article 24. 

Voted, at 9.24 p.m., To raise by taxation $287,000. and also 
an amount sufficient to meet the State and County taxes after 
deducting receipts from the State Income tax. 

25 



Took up Article 25. 

Voted, at 9.25 p.m., That the Board of Public Works be re- 
quested to investigate the flowage of water in Rogers Brook and 
intersecting streams and report at the next annual town meeting 
some plan for preventing flooding of adjacent roads, sidewalks, 
land and cellars. 

Voted, at 9.29 p.m., That the meeting be dissolved. 

The foregoing is a true copy of the warrant and of the officers' 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings of the regular 
and adjourned meetings. 

Attest: 

GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Town Clerk 



26 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 15, 1922 
WARRANT 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ss.: To either of the Constables of the Town of An- 
dover: Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in town affairs to meet and assemble at the Town House 
in said Andover, on Saturday, the Fifteenth day of April, 1922 at 
7.30 o'clock p.m., to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To hear and act upon the report of the joint com- 
mittee authorized by the annual town meeting to select a suitable 
lot of land for municipal or town purposes in the district known as 
Shawsheen Village, to make an appropriation, if necessary, or 
take such further action as may be deemed expedient. 

Article 2. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$1200. in addition to the amount already appropriated for the 
Police Department for the purpose of paying the expenses of a 
day off for regular patrolmen and for the purchase of a motor- 
cycle for the new traffic officer. 

Article 3. — To see if the town will vote to instruct the Select- 
men to release a certain right of way for the maintenance of 
drainage pipes over the premises of Albert L. Hall and Clyde A. 
White, located on the southerly side of Park Street, in said town, 
on petition of Raymond L. Buchan and others. 

Article 4. — To act on any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof seven days at least before the time 
of said meeting as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

27 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this sixth day of April, A.D. 1922. 

WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Selectmen of A ndover 



Andover, Mass., April 15, 1922 
Essex, ss. 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabi- 
tants of said town to meet at the time and place and for the 
purposes stated in said warrant by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same on the Town House, on each schoolhouse and in 
no less than five other public places, where bills and notices are 
usually posted, and by publication in the Andover Townsman. 
Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

FRANK M. SMITH 

Constable 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to vote in town affairs convened in the Town House in 
said Andover, on Saturday, the Fifteenth day of April, 1922 at 
7.30 o'clock in the evening, agreeably to the requirements of the 
foregoing warrant, Moderator Alfred L. Ripley presided and read 
the warrant. 

Took up Article 1. 

Voted, at 7.43 p.m., To accept and adopt the report of the 
joint committee authorized by the Annual Town Meeting to 
select a suitable lot of land for municipal or town purposes in 
Shawsheen Village. The report was as follows: 

In accordance with the vote at the recent annual town meeting 
the selectmen and school committee organized, with Mr. Walter 
Donald as chairman, as a joint committee to select a schoolhouse 
lot in Shawsheen Village, determine its value and report at a 

28 



special town meeting to be held not later than April 15, 1922. 
Several meetings of this committee have been held and a thorough 
survey of the situation has been made. 

The first consideration of the probable increase, due to the 
contemplated rapid development of the Village, in the number of 
children, whose accommodation will require a very large building 
or a group of buildings, also the conviction that a modern school 
building needs ample play-grounds and athletic facilities, led 
immediately to the conclusion that the site of the present building 
is insufficient to care for the future needs and that it would be a 
wise policy for the town to secure at least ten acres of land in the 
vicinity of the present center of school population. 

The present center of school population was found to be in the 
vicinity of the junction of North Main Street and Warwick 
Street. Careful consideration given the prospective development 
of the Village on both sides of Main Street showed that the future 
would probably bring little, if any, change in the distribution of 
the population. Proximity to the railroad, the line of the Eastern 
Massachusetts Street Railway Company and the thoroughfares 
over which there is heavy traffic, was unanimously agreed upon as 
a serious and ever threatening danger to the safety and even the 
lives of the children and, therefore, as far as possible to be 
avoided. Drainage and grading, two extremely important 
factors in the location of school lots, were also discussed and due 
consideration was given to the splendid type of buildings already 
exemplified in the present development. 

As a result of these deliberations the joint committee has, after 
a thorough survey of the Village, arrived at the conclusion that 
the most suitable lot which would fulfill the above conditions is 
located at the corner formed by the junction of Poor Street and 
Warwick Street Extension. Representatives of the committee 
interviewed the owners of this property, whom they found un- 
willing to set prices. The committee's unwillingness at the 
present time to recommend the seizure of land, also the will of the 
town as expressed by its vote on the matter at the annual town 
meeting, and the present impossibility of making a purchase, 
brought the situation to a dead-lock, and no land can be secured 
until there have been further negotiations. And the committee 

29 



therefore recommend that they be continued in power to report 
at some future town meeting. 

Took up Article 2. 

Voted, at 7.45 p.m., To appropriate the sum of $1200. for the 
Police Department for the purpose of paying the expenses of a 
day off for regular patrolmen and for the purchase of a motor- 
cycle for the new traffic officer. It was also voted that it was the 
sense of the meeting that the Selectmen give further considera- 
tion to the matter of time off for the police and report at the next 
annual town meeting. 

Took up Article 3. 

Voted, at 7.50 p.m., That, in consideration of one dollar and 
other valuable consideration, the town instruct the Selectmen 
to release a certain right of way for the maintenance of drainage 
pipes over the premises of Albert L. Hall and Clyde A. White 
located on the southerly side of Park Street, in said town. 

Took up Article 4. 

Voted, at 7.51 p.m., That the meeting be dissolved. 
The foregoing is a true copy of the warrant and of the Officers' 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

Attest: 

GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Town Clerk 



30 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 29, 1922 
WARRANT 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ss.: To either of the Constables of the Town of An- 
dover, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to 
vote in town affairs to meet and assemble at the Town House in 
said Andover, on Monday, the Twenty-ninth day of May, 1922, 
at 8 o'clock p.m., to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To see if the town will vote to issue bonds or notes 
of the town in the aggregate amount of forty thousand ($40,000.) 
dollars for the purpose of re-laying and extending its water mains 
and improving its water distribution facilities, as authorized by 
Chapter 308 Acts of 1922, on petition of the Board of Public 
Works. 

Article 2. — To see if the town will authorize and direct the 
Board of Public Works to petition the Legislature of 1923 for 
authority to borrow $150,000. outside the statutory limit of 
indebtedness, by bond issue or otherwise, for the following 
purposes: To construct and maintain a pipe line, in accordance 
with plans approved by the State Board of Health, for the 
purpose of disposing of the sewage of the Town of Andover, said 
pipe line to extend from Andover through the City of Lawrence 
to the Merrimack River, and to authorize the purchase or taking 
of land in said Andover and Lawrence necessary for said site and 
to award and pay damages for said purchases or takings, on 
petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 3. — To see if the town will vote to extend the water 
main on Corbett Street a distance of 1500 ft., and appropriate 
the sum of $4000. to pay for the same, on petition of Edward 
Topping and others. 

31 



Article 4. • — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$1000. for the Brush Fire Department, in addition to the 
amount appropriated at the Annual Town Meeting, to pay for 
necessary expenses already incurred and for other charges during 
the balance of the year. 

Article 5. — To see if the town will authorize the discontinu- 
ance of that part of Chapel Avenue extending from the easterly 
side of Bartlet Street to Salem Street, on petition of James C. 
Sawyer and others. 

Article 6. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$1800. to cover the expense of additional street lighting made 
necessary by the placing of wires underground on Main Street 
from Andover Square to Chapel Avenue, on petition of the 
Street Lighting Committee 

Article 7. — To act on any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof, seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this Eighteenth day of May, A.D. 
1922. 

WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Selectmen of A ndover 



Andover, Mass., May 29, 1922 
Essex, ss. 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of 
the Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabi- 
tants of said town to meet at the time and place and for the 
purposes stated in said warrant by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same on the Town House, on each schoolhouse and in 

32 



no less than five other public places, where bills and notices are 
usually posted, and by publication in the Andover Townsman. 
Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

FRANK M. SMITH, 

Constable 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to vote in town affairs convened in the Town House in 
said Andover on Monday, the twenty-ninth day of May, 1922, at 
8 o'clock in the evening agreeably to the requirements of the 
foregoing warrant, Moderator Alfred L. Ripley presided and read 
the warrant. 

Took up Article 1. 

Voted, at 8.16 p.m., That by virtue and in pursuance of 
Chapter 308, Acts of 1922, and for the purposes mentioned 
therein, viz.: for relaying and extending the town's water main 
and improving its water distribution facilities, the sum of forty 
thousand ($40,000.) dollars be and hereby is appropriated and to 
raise said amount the Town Treasurer is hereby authorized to 
issue and sell bonds or notes of the town in said principal amount 
of forty thousand ($40,000.) dollars. Said bonds or notes shall be 
denominated on the face thereof "Andover Water Loan, Act of 
1922," shall be signed by the Treasurer and countersigned by a 
majority of the Board of Selectmen and of the Board of Public 
Works, shall bear interest at a rate not exceeding five (5) per 
cent per annum, payable semi-annually and be under the seal 
of the town. Said bonds or notes shall be dated July 1, 1922 and 
be payable $4000. annually in the years 1923 to 1932 inclusive, so 
that the whole loan shall be payable by annual payments in not 
exceeding ten (10) years. Principal and interest of said bonds or 
notes shall be payable at such bank or trust company as the 
Treasurer may determine. Said bonds or notes may be sold at 
public or private sale at not less than their par value, shall be 
certified by a bank or trust company to be selected by the 
Treasurer and contain such recitals not inconsistent with legal 
requirements as the Treasurer may determine. Yeas 86, Nays 0. 
Also voted that from the proceeds of the above sale the Board of 

33 



Public Works is authorized and directed to make such changes 
in and extensions to the water system as it may deem expedient. 

Took up Article 2. 

Voted, at 9.36 p.m., To authorize and direct the Board of 
Public Works to petition the Legislature of 1923 for authority to 
borrow $150,000. outside the statutory limit of indebtedness, by 
bond issue or otherwise for the purpose of constructing and 
maintaining a pipe line as may be approved by the State Board 
of Health, for the disposal of the sewage of the Town of Andover, 
said pipe line to extend from Andover through the City of 
Lawrence to the Merrimack River, or for constructing any other 
system of sewage disposal approved by the State Board of 
Health, and for any other legislation that may be necessary to 
carry out the provisions of this article. 

Voted, at 9.39 p.m., That the Board of Public Works be 
directed to investigate the problem of the Town sewers, their 
location and discharge and to employ necessary expert advice 
and give public hearings thereon and for this purpose they be 
authorized to expend a sum not exceeding five thousand dollars. 

Took up Article 3. 

Voted, at 9.42 p.m., That the extension of the water main on 
Corbett Street be referred to the Board of Public Works. 

Took up Article 4. 

Voted, at 9.48 p.m., That the sum of $1000. be appropriated 
for the Brush Fire Department, in addition to the amount 
appropriated at the Annual Town Meeting for expenses already 
incurred and other charges during the balance of the year. 

Took up Article 5. 

' Voted, at 9.49 p.m., That all that portion of Chapel Avenue, 
a private way laid out by the Trustees of Phillips Academy and 
heretofore used by the public, extending from the easterly end of 
Bartlet Street, at its intersection with said Chapel Avenue, and 
between said Bartlet Street and Salem Street, be and the same is 
hereby discontinued. 

34 



Took up Article 6. 

Voted, at 10.15 p.m., That the sum of $600. be appropriated 
to cover the expense of additional street lighting made necessary 
and deemed advisable by the reconstruction of Main Street, said 
sum to be for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1922, and that 
it be the sense of the meeting that the system as proposed by the 
Street Lighting Committee be endorsed. 

Took up Article 7. 

Voted, at 10.17 p.m., That the Selectmen with the aid and 
advice of the Finance Committee be requested to take further 
steps looking to a relocation of street railway wires on Main 
Street and that any expense be taken from Miscellaneous appro- 
priation, if such is available. 

Voted, at 10.18 p.m., That the meeting be dissolved. 

The foregoing is a true copy of the warrant and of the officers' 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

Attest: 

GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Town Clerk 



35 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, NOVEMBER 13, 1922 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ss. : To either of the Constables of the Town of An- 
dover, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to 
vote in town affairs to meet and assemble at the Town House in 
said Andover, on Monday, the thirteenth day of November, 1922, 
at 7.30 o'clock p.m., to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To hear and act upon the report of the Joint 
Committee, of the School Committee and Selectmen, chosen to 
consider the question of a suitable site for a school building in 
Shawsheen Village. 

Article 2. — To see if the town will accept the gift of the 
American Woolen Company of a plot of land of approximately 
five acres bounded by Corbett Road, Poor Street, Magnolia 
Avenue, Middle Street and Allen Street as set forth in the letter of 
William M. Wood, President, to the Board of Selectmen and 
School Committee, dated August 1, 1922, such plot to be used for 
school purposes, on petition of the School Committee and 
Selectmen. 

Article 3. — To see if the town will authorize the School Com- 
mittee to employ an architect to examine the lot and make pre- 
liminary plans for a school building thereon and appropriate a 
sum not exceeding one thousand dollars ($1000) therefor, on 
petition of the School Committee and the Selectmen. 

Article 4. — - To see if the town will vote to change the name 
of Warwick Street in the Shawsheen Village section of the town 
to "William Street," on petition of Granville K. Cutler and others. 

Article 5. — To see if the town will authorize the Selectmen to 
have the buildings, recently purchased of the Cunningham heirs 
on Whittier Court, razed or otherwise disposed of. 

36 



Article 6. — To see if the town will vote to accept the offer of 
Leonidas Hamel of a strip of land ten (10) feet wide, running the 
entire length of the northeastern side of his land abutting the 
Filter Bed Road, so-called, a roadway 30 feet wide running from 
Haverhill Street to the Filter Bed Lot, so-called, and now owned 
by the Town. The forty (40) feet road thus created to be put 
into shape for a Town Road to be accepted as such, and appro- 
priate a sum of money therefor. Said road to be known as Frye 
Road, on petition of Leonidas Hamel and others. 

Article 7. — To see if the town will vote to authorize and 
instruct the Selectmen to set apart a strip of land fifty (50) feet 
in width on the extreme southeastern boundary of the land now 
owned by the town and known as the Filter Bed Lot. Said strip 
to run the entire distance from the wall of the B. & M. R. R. to 
the wall on land of Charlotte M. Hill, along the line of the land 
of Edward Fleming, Leonidas Hamel, and American Woolen 
Company. Said Charlotte M. Hill to donate the land to con- 
tinue said way across her land to connect with the way on City of 
Lawrence land, and now running to Salem Turnpike, so-called. 
Said way thus laid out to be known as Den Rock Way, and to be 
put in condition as a street and so accepted as a street when the 
citizens in some future Town Meeting may decide, on petition 
of Leonidas Hamel and others. 

Article 8. — To act on any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof, seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this second day of November, A.D. 
1922. 

WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Selectmen of A ndovtr 
37 



Andover, November 13, 1922 
Essex, ss. 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of 
the Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the in- 
habitants of said town to meet at the time and place and for the 
purposes stated in said warrant by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same on the Town House, on each schoolhouse and in 
no less than five other public places, where bills and notices are 
usually posted and by publication in the Andover Townsman. 
Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

FRANK M. SMITH, Constable 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to vote in town affairs convened in the Town House in 
said Andover, on Monday the Thirteenth day of November, 
1922 at 7.30 o'clock in the evening, agreeably to the requirements 
of the foregoing warrant, Moderator Alfred L. Ripley presided 
and read the warrant. 

Before taking up Article 1 of the warrant, Moderator Alfred L. 
Ripley, with the consent of the meeting, referred feelingly to the 
deaths of two prominent citizens of the town, Hon. John N. Cole 
and Judge Charles U. Bell, and Dr. Alfred E. Stearns paid a 
splendid tribute to their activities in public and private affairs and 
reminded the citizens of the great loss sustained. 

Took up Article 1. 

Voted, at 7.58 p.m., To accept the report of the joint com- 
mittee as read by the Chairman, Dr. E. C. Conroy. 

Took up Article 2. 

Voted, at 9.45 p.m., To accept the gift of the American 
Woolen Company of a plot of land of approximately five acres, 
bounded by Corbett Street, Poor Street, Magnolia Avenue, 
Middle Street and Allen Street as set forth in the letter of 
William M. Wood, President, to the Board of Selectmen and 
School Committee, dated August 1, 1922, such plot to be used for 
school purposes. 

38 



Took up Article 3. 

Voted, at 9.50 p.m., To authorize the School Committee to 
employ an architect to examine the lot and make preliminary 
plans for a school building thereon and to appropriate a sum not 
exceeding one thousand dollars ($1000.) therefor, and that the 
Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be author- 
ized, if necessary, to borrow said sum on note of the town, the 
same to be paid from the tax levy of 1923. 

Took up Article 4. 

Voted, at 9.52 p.m., To change the name of Warwick Street 
in Shawsheen Village section of the town to "William Street." 

Took up Article 5. 

Voted, at 9.53 p.m., To authorize the Selectmen to have the 
buildings, recently purchased of the Cunningham heirs on 
Whittier Court, razed or otherwise disposed of. 

Took up Articles 6 and 7. 

Voted, at 9.55 p.m., That both articles be stricken from the 
warrant. 

Voted, at 9.56 p.m., That the meeting be dissolved. 
The foregoing is a true copy of the warrant and of the officers' 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings "of the meet- 
ing. 

Attest: 

GEORGE A. HIGGINS, 

Town Clerk 



39 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT 



SCHOOLS 



GENERAL EXPENSES 



ries : 

Superintendent 
Attendance Officer 
Clerk 


$3800.00 
103.60 
424.00 


$4327.60 
298.45 


Office and Miscellaneous 


298.45 



4626.05 



EXPENSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Supervisors : 
Salaries 
Traveling Expenses 

Teachers : 
High 
Elementary 

Textbooks : 
High 
Elementary 

Supplies : 
High 
Elementary 



Amount carried forward 



4128.16 
73.00 



15640.81 


4201 


.16 


47342.57 








62983 


.38 


545.71 






1391.08 








1936 


.79 


1151.03 


1992.57 








3143 


.60 



$76890.98 



40 



EXPENSES OF OPERATION 

Amount brought forward $76890.98 

Janitors 7088.91 

Fuel 5808.11 

Miscellaneous 689 . 95 

13586.97 

MAINTENANCE 

Repairs 4653.26 

4653.26 

AUXILIARY AGENCIES 

Health 1425.15 

Transportation 5732.97 

7158.12 



MISCELLANEOUS 
Tuition 624.47 

Sundries 1295.40 

1919.87 

NEW EQUIPMENT 

New Equipment 414.75 414.75 

SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND 
EXPENDITURES 
Appropriation $103420. 00 

Receipts 1207.38 

104627.38 

Total Expenditures 104623 . 95 

Balance 3.43 



41 



TOWN OFFICERS 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 

Walter S. Donald, Chairman, Selectman 

and Assessor 
Walter S. Donald, expenses 
Charles Bowman, Selectman and Assessor 
Andrew McTernen, Selectman and Assessor 
George A. Higgins, Town Clerk 
George A. Higgins, Town Treasurer 
George A. Higgins, expenses 
William B. Cheever, Tax Collector 
Edith P. Sellars, Clerk 
William C. Crowley, Sealer, weights and 

measures 
Joseph I. Pitman, Building Inspector 
Daniel J. Murphy, Town Counsel 
Walter H. Coleman, Auditor 
John Robertson, Auditor 
Harry Sellars, Auditor 
Smart & Flagg, Agents, Surety Bonds 
Lilla D. Stott, probate and real estate 

returns 
C. M. Hewes, clerical work 
H. C. Higgins, clerical work 
Board of Assessors, expenses 
F. & E. Check Writer Sales Co., check 

protector 
Auto List Pub. Co., auto list 
Bank & Office Equipment Co., cabinet 
Banker & Tradesman, subscription 
Charles F. Emerson, auto hire 

Amount carried forward 



$10< 


)00.00 


$900,000 




34.65 




800.00 




r 800.00 




1200.00 




1200.00 




33.90 




1800.00 




1118.00 


• 


222.54 




499.92 




500.00 




75.00 




75.00 




100.00 




180.00 




74.80 




38.10 




25.00 




25.00 




23.00 




12.00 




37.75 




7.00 




20.00 




$9823.66 





42 



Amount brought forward $9823 . 66 $10000. 00 

Division of Accounts, certif. of notes 22 . 00 

Walter J. Morrissey, auto hire 35.50 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 4 . 35 

J. H. McDonald, P.M., envelopes 2. 18 

M. J. Doyle Transportation Co. 1.00 



Total expenditure $ 9866 . 69 

Balance 133.31 



$10000.00 $10000.00 



43 



TOWN HOUSE 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 $3000.00 

George W. Mears, Janitor 

Lawrence Gas Co., 

C. A. Hill & Co., electrical supplies 

And over Coal Co., fuel 

B. L. McDonald Co., fuel 

M. T. Walsh, plumbing repairs 

Board of Public Works 

Buchan & McNally, repairs 

James Smith, labor 

James Holt, painting 

David M. May, police duty 

Walter I. Morse, hardware 

Gray and Kendall, repairs 

William C. Brown, labor 

H. I. Dallman Co., duster, brushes 

Peoples' Ice Co., ice 

Energy Electric Co., electric bulbs 

Charles F. Emerson, carting 

Cheshire Chemical Co., dust void 

Fire Department, use of horses 

John K. Tuohy, luster rite 

Cornelius Eldred, labor 

Royal Murphy, labor 

John Madden, labor 

Patrick Reilly, labor 

Annie F. Brown, laundry 

John Ferguson, repairing clock 

Beach Soap Co., soap 

W. H. Sylvester, tuning piano 



Amount carried forward 



$840.00 


345. 


23 


95. 


14 


130.35 


304. 


76 


157. 


68 


102. 


77 


63. 


17 


71. 


10 


56.60 


73. 


50 


46. 


53 


54 


26 


37. 


00 


24. 


65 


12 


00 


15 


.00 


15 


.50 


9 


.00 


14 


.40 


10 


.00 


8 


.10 


3 


.60 


2 


.25 


2 


.25 


3 


.00 


3 


.00 


6 


.06 


5 


.00 


$2511.90 



44 



Amount brought forward 

Inez E. Thorning, labor 
Charles N. Smart, ventilators 
J. E. Pitman, repairs 
Cudahy Packing Co., soap 
Daniel P. Webster, police duty 
Albert W. Lowe, germicide 
Monument Mills, supplies 
Badger Fire Extinguisher Co., 3 extin- 
guishers 
Bank & Office Equip. Co., 2 steel cases 
C. S. Buchan, telephone table 
Charles J. Francis, sundries 
J. W. Richardson, repairs 
Boston & Lawrence Dispatch, freight 
Frank G. Emery, disinfectant 
H. L. Hiland, sweeper 
Co-operative Grocery store, ammonia 
Theo. Muise, repairing flag 
E. T. Hethrington, salt 
Anderson & Bowman, scraper 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



$2511.90 $3' 


000.00 


2.00 




17.50 




23.05 




9.15 




42.50 




2.00 




16.50 




40.50 




9.00 




6.00 




2.40 




2.96 




1.48 




3.00 




3.25 




1.06 




1.50 




.75 




.50 




$2697.00 




303.00 





$3000.00 $3000.00 



45 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation, March 6, 


1922 




S23000.00 


Earnings Dept. teams 






1470.05 


Salaries, Engineers 




S800.00 




Wages, permanent men 




11369.26 




Wages, call men 




2805.00 




Wages, fire alarm 




408.60 




Horses and care of same 




1063.35 




Equipment and repairs 




2486.58 




Fuel and Light 




928. 88 




Maintenance of buildings 


and grounds 


1163.94 




Fire Alarm 




2254.69 




Miscellaneous Expenses 




687.40 




Total expenditures 


$23967.70 




Balance 




502.35 





$24470.05 S24470.05 



BRUSH FIRES 


$1465.50 
32.40 
35.21 




Appropriation, March 6, 

Special Appropriation 

Pay Rolls 

Walter I. Morse, shovels 

Lunches 


1922 


$600.00 
1000.00 


Total expenditures 
Balance 


1533.11 
66.89 





$1600.00 $1600.00 



47 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 




$11000.00 


Special Appropriation 




1200.00 


Salary, Chief 


$1872.00 




Pay Roll — patrolmen 


7629.86 




Wages, Specials 


909.09 




Automobile hire 


556.00 




Equipment and repairs 


519.20 




Telephones 


143 . 24 




Motorcycle 


604.50 




Light 


55.57 




Drowning accident 


80.00 




Miscellaneous 


236.69 




Total expenditure 


12606.15 




Overdrawn 




406.15 



$12606.15 $12606.15 



48 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 

Lotta Johnson, salary 

Lotta Johnson, use of car 

Lotta Johnson, inspector of meat 

Charles H. Newton, Animal Inspector 

Charles H. Newton, use of horse and 

team 
Joseph Nolan, Plumbing Inspector 
John S. Buchan, Assistant Plumbing 

Inspector 
Dr. Charles E. Abbott, salary 
Dr. Charles E. Abbott, fumigation 
Franklin H. Stacey, salary 
Franklin H. Stacey, fumigation & supplies 
B. T. Haynes, salary 
B. T. Haynes, fumigation 
Essex Sanatorium, board 
Lakeville Sanatorium, board 
Westfield Sanatorium, board 
J. H. Campion & Co., provisions 
The Andover Press, printing 
Removing contagious patient 
Albert W. Lowe, fumigators 
John Fraize, killing cats 

Total expenditure 
Overdrawn 





$3300.00 


$1500.00 




200.00 




200.00 




202.50 




121.50 




318.00 




20.00 




75.00 




93.00 


i 


50.00 




174.33 




50.00 




3.00 




308.60 




104.00 




103.00 




6.09 




47.65 




15.60 




4.17 




7.00 




$3603.44 






303.44 



$3603.44 $3603.44 



49 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 $2000.00 

The Andover Press, advertising, print- 
ing and supplies $1621 . 27 
J. H. McDonald, P. M., stamped enve- 
lopes 171.47 
Hobbs & Warren, blanks 36 . 89 
Adams, Cushing & Foster, record books 26.75 
Burroughs Adding Machine Co., services 12.02 
Library Bureau, cards 19.06 
Miller Bryant & Pierce Co., carbon paper 15. 75 
Becker & Co., stationery 12 . 25 
Wright & Potter Printing Co., tax blanks 14. 75 
H. M. Meserve & Co., blotters 8.90 
Birmingham Pen Co., pens 5.35 
P. B. Murphy, dog licenses 3.50 
James Barrie, stamp pads 3.00 
Commissioner of Public Safety, license 

books 2.55 
The Chicataubut Press, Veterans' abate- 
ment blanks 2.50 
A. W. Brownell Corp. tax tables 1 . 50 
Lubron Rubber Co., rubber bands 1.50 

Total expenditure $1959 . 01 

Balance 40.99 



$2000.00 $2000.00 



50 



TREE WARDEN AND MOTH DEPARTMENT 



• 


fREE WARDEN 




Edward H. Berry, tree warden 


$1307.81 


Pay rolls 




5882.73 


Team hire 




694.33 


Truck hire 




165.38 


Trees, rock maples 




70.00 


Equipment 




215.02 


Repairs 




90.95 


Miscellaneous supplies 




89.30 


Edward H. Berry, expenses 


18.59 


Freight 




28.23 


Printing 




20.50 


Total 


8582.84 




MOTH WORK 




Appropriation, March 6, 


1922 


12900.00 


Edward H. Berry, Supt. 




$294.54 


Pay Rolls 




3421.19 


Equipment 




431.41 


Rent 




120.00 


Team hire 




883.37 


Truck hire 




51.00 


Supplies, lead, creosote 




985.94 


Repairs 




273.47 


Freight 




15.08 


Printing 




11 .00 


E. H. Berry, expenses 




7.90 


Total 


6494.90 


Receipts to balance 




2177.74 



Total Expenditures 



$15077.74 $15077.74 



51 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



Appropriation March 13, 1922 

Sale of lots 

Care of lots 

Perpetual care 

Interments and use of tomb 

Foundations 

Sundries, sale of wood, mowers, etc. 

Int. on deposits 

Pay rolls 

Board of Public Works, pipe & water 

Edith P. Sellars, Clerk 

John F. McDonough, cinders 

Elmer F. Conkey, horse & team 

Walter I. Morse, hardware 

Walter I. Morse, power lawn mower 

J. H. Play don, plants 

C. S. Buchan, canvas cover 

Buchan & McNally, drain tile & supplies 

Reade Mfg. Co., herbicide 

Boston Pipe & Fittings Co., pipe 

R. S. Wilson, tractor work 

Frank E. Dodge, cement 

Warren F. Howe, cleaning stones 

Philip L. Hardy, cement 

John Shea, seed 

American Vault Works, markers 

Anderson & Bowman, repairing frills 

J. E. Pitman, labor & supplies 

George D. Millett, plants 

Gray and Kendall, filing saw 

Amount carried forward 





$2500.00 




479.00 




1026.00 




410.00 




482 . 00 




201.87 




35.00 




13.27 


$3711.50 




126.24 




100.00 




150.50 




309.50 




35.81 




227.30 




34.90 




25.00 




43.40 




36.66 




87.51 




15.00 




17.70 




39.00 




18.00 




12.75 




14.52 




14.55 




25.12 




5.00 




2.15 





$5052.11 $5147.14 



52 



Amount brought forward 


$5052.11 $5 


147.14 


George Seymour, fuse 


2.50 




F. A. Swan ton, stamps 


9.00 




Holland Construction Co., dynamite 


1.25 




John L. Morrison, repairing plow 


8.50 




B. & M. R.R., freight 


5.87 




The Andover Press, record cards 


10.50 




Allied Arts Pub. Co., subscription 


8.00 




E. W. Pitman Co., land tile 


5.50 




Balance 


43.91 





$5147.14 $5147.14 



53 



INSURANCE 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 $3000.00 

Appropriation, Workmen's Compensation 2500.00 

Smart & Flagg, Agents $2928 . 43 

Merrimack Mut. Fire Ins. Co. 1651.06 



Total expenditure 
Balance 



$4579.49 
920.51 



HAY SCALES 



$5500.00 $5500.00 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 




$125.00 


Receipts 




50.00 


William C. Brown, weigher 


$100.00 




Balance 


75.00 





$175.00 $175.00 



STREET LIGHTING 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 
Special Appropriation 
Lawrence Gas Company 
Balance 


$8200.00 
600.00 
$8100.42 
699.58 



$8800.00 $8800.00 



54 



SEWER SINKING FUND 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 $1000.00 

William D. Mclntyre, Treas. Sink. Fund $1000.00 



$1000.00 $1000.00 



STATE TAX AND HIGHWAY TAX 



Andover's proportion of State Tax 

Andover's proportion of Highway Tax 

Bank Tax 

Civilian War Poll Tax 

Bank Tax, Equalization claims 

Corporation Tax, Equalization claims 

Treasurer of Commonwealth 



$24000.00 

2738.88 

2370.06 

7452.00 

38.86 

301.88 



$36901.68 



$36901.68 $36901.68 



COUNTY TAX 



Andover's proportion of County Tax 
Walter P. Babb, County Treas. 



$19151.19 



$19151.19 



55 



19151.19 19151.19 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 
Frederic S. Boutwell, Treas. 



$3000.00 



$3000.00 



DOG TAX 



$3000.00 $3000.00 



Received from County Treasurer S494 . 60 

Paid F. S. Boutwell, Treas. Memorial Hall $494.60 



s $494.60 S494.60 



MEMORIAL DAY 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 
Charles U. Bell, Quartermaster 



S550.00 



$550.00 



$550.00 $550.00 



POST 99, G. A. R. 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 
Charles U. Bell, Quartermaster 



$100.00 



$100.00 



$100.00 $100.00 



56 



RETIREMENT OF VETERANS 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 
Paid to Veteran 



$300.00 



$300.00 



PUBLIC DUMP 



$300.00 $300.00 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 
Olof Benson, Keeper 


$75.00 


$75.00 




$75.00 

$3240.00 

1900.00 

2980.00 

593 . 76 

5411.05 


$75.00 


INTEREST 




Appropriation, March 6, 1922 
Interest received on deposits 
Paid 162 High School Bond coupons 
Paid 75 Sewer Bond coupons 
Paid 149 Sewer Bond coupons 
Paid 30 Shawsheen Bridge coupons 
Interest on revenue notes 


$14000.00 
1240.09 


Total expenditure 
Balance 


14124.81 
1115.28 





$15240.09 $15240.09 



57 



NOTES GIVEN 



Andover National Bank, Notes 27-28, Rate $4.40 $20000.00 



Andover National Bank, Note 29 " 4.35 

Andover National Bank, Note 30 " 4. 20 

Andover National Bank, Notes 31-36 " 3 . 92 

Andover National Bank, Notes 37-39 " 3.57 



NOTES PAID 



25000.00 
100000.00 
100000.00 

50000.00 

$295000.00 



Andover National Bank 



$295000.00 



REDEMPTION OF BONDS 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 


$15500.00 


Six High School Bonds 


$6000.00 


Seven Sewer Bonds 


7000. 00 


Shawsheen Bridge Bonds 


2500.00 



$15500.00 $15500.00 



ANDOVER POST NO. 8, AMERICAN LEGION 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 
John L. Dugan, Treasurer 
Balance 



$1500.00 



$528.28 
971.72 



$1500.00 $1500.00 



58 



SOLDIERS' MEMORIAL COMMITTEE 



Balance, Jan. 1, 1922 
John Nolen, Landscape architect 
Balance 



$2000.00 



$800.00 
1200.00 



$2000.00 $2000.00 



PILGRIM MEMORIAL TABLET 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 
Theodore S. Nickerson, engraving 
Balance 



$150.00 



$120.00 
30.00 



$150.00 $150.00 



WAR MEMORIAL BOOK 



Balance, Jan. 1, 1922 

J. H. McDonald, P.M., postage 

C. H. Newman, photographs 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



$2.81 


3 


00 


5 


.81 


61 


09 



$66.90 



$66.90 $66.90 



59 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 

J. E. Pitman, building inspector 
J. E. Pitman, repairs 
Herbert Clarke, repairs 
W. J. Morrissey, auto hire 
Board of Public Works, water 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 
Alvah P. Wright, field driver 
C. W. Holland, damage to auto 
J. H. Playdon, flowers 
William F. Gledhill, fish warden 
W. & L. E. Gurley, sealer's supplies 
H. M. Meserve & Co. sealer's supplies 
American Railway Express Co., freight 
John A. Riley, supplies 
Andover National Bank, deposit box 
Samson Murdock Co., directory 
Dr. P. J. Look, return of births 
Dr. W. D. Walker, return of births 
Dr. J. J. Daly, return of births 
Dr. E. C. Conroy, return of births 
Dr. E. D. Lane, return of births 
Dr. W. V. Grant, return of births 
Dr. C. W. Scott, return of birth 
Dr. T. J. Cullinane, return of birth 
Dr. F. A. Cregg, return of births 
Dr. J.J. Deacy, return of births 
Dr. W. R. Hoffman, return of births 
Dr. H. H. Nevers, return of births 
Everett M. Lundgren, return of deaths 

■Amount carried forward 





$1200.00 


200. 


00 


9. 


18 


206.60 


51. 


25 


13. 


31 


14. 


95 


25. 


00 


106.30 


10. 


00 


10 


.00 


48 


.66 


11 


.45 


7, 


.81 


6 


.75 


5.00 


5 


.00 


9 


.75 


9 


.00 


3 


.75 




.75 


4 


.00 




.75 




.25 




.25 


1 


.00 




.50 




.50 




.50 


18 


.50 



$780.76 



60 



Amount brought forward $780.76 

M. J. Mahoney, return of deaths 5 . 00 

E. L. Bennett, return of deaths 2.00 

J. J. Breen, return of deaths .50 

Alfred J. Martel, return of deaths . 75 

Joseph H. Couture & Son, return of deaths 1 . 00 

Edgerley & Bessom, return of deaths .50 

Lyle Brothers, batteries . 50 

Registry of deeds, recording 1 . 38 



$1200.00 



Total expenditure 
Balance 



792.39 
407.61 



$1200.00 $1200.00 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



The Overseers of the Poor submit the following report for the 
year ending December 31, 1922. 

At the last annual Town meeting it was voted to build a new 
Almshouse on the southerly end of Carmel reservation. The 
Selectmen were empowered to add two associate members to 
this building committee and Mrs. Fred A. Swanton and Perley 
F. Gilbert were chosen. After many unavoidable delays the 
home was completed and occupied on January 24, 1923. 

In order to keep within the appropriation your committee were 
obliged to cut down the original plans and before we had finished 
found it would be absolutely essential to replace some of the 
things that we eliminated at first. The State Inspector also 
ordered some additions and these with other necessary changes 
will have to be provided for through an appropriation. We 
would also recommend a sufficient sum to build a barn and garage 
combined. We hope in the near future to be able to run the 
home at less expense as everything is very convenient. The in- 
mates show satisfaction and pleasure in their new home. The 
Outside Relief continues to be about the same from year to 
year. The present matron, Mrs. Fred A. Swanton, is an assurance 
that the home and the inmates will be well cared for under her 
wise and efficient management. 

WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Overseers of the Poor 



62 



ALMSHOUSE EXPENSES 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 




$6000. 00 


Receipts 




619.03 


Mrs. F. A. Swanton, matron 


875.00 




Wages, employees 


1404.00 




Groceries and provisions 


2073.53 




Hay and grain 


290.43 




Fuel and light 


930.71 




Clothing and supplies 


215.21 




Equipment 


285.82 




Maintenance, buildings and grounds 


110.28 




Medicine and medical aid 


106.18 




Town physician 


100.00 




Water 


50.44 




Telephone 


10.45 




Funeral expenses 


100.00 




Miscellaneous 


161.03 




Total expenditure 


6713.08 




Overdrawn 




94.05 



$6713.08 $6713.08 



63 



SOLDIERS* RELIEF 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 

Total expenditure 
Balance 


$1500.00 

$1441.05 
58.95 



$1500.00 $1500.00 



STATE AID 




Appropriation, March 6, 1922 


$1000.00 


Total expenditure 


$516.00 


Balance 


484.00 



$1000.00 $1000.00 



MILITARY AID 



No appropriation 

Total expenditure 
Overdrawn 



$75.00 



$75.00 



$75.00 $75.00 



64 



NEW ALMSHOUSE 



Appropriations 

Interest on Deposits 

E. W. Pitman Co., contract 

W. H. Welch Co., plumbing and heating 

C. A. Hill, electrical work 

Perley F. Gilbert, architect 

Board of Public Works 

M. McDonough Co., grading 

McCray Refrigerator Co. 

E. F. Conkey, grading 

B. L. McDonald, coal 

Emil M. Teichert Co., papering 
Frank E. Dodge, cement work 
Stedman Products Co., Rubber flooring 

C. S. Buchan, linoleum 
A. M. Colby, lettering 

Dana W. Clark, engineering work 
Boston & Maine R.R., freight 
Andover Townsman, advertising 
Lawrence Eagle, advertising 
Telegram Publishing Co., advertising 
W. J. Morrissey, auto hire 
Andrew McTernen, expenses 

Total expenditure 
Balance 





40300.00 




1028.87 


$28937.00 


5573. 


66 


900. 


29 


2167. 


,83 


504.80 


636 


.24 


290.72 


150.00 


199.30 


115 


.00 


180 


.00 


831 


.00 


644 


.35 


8 


.00 


36 


.00 


9 


.28 


3 


.60 


12 


.00 


12. 


00 


30. 


00 


5, 


,00 


41246. 


07 


82. 


80 



$41328.87 $41328.87 



65 



OUTSIDE RELIEF 



Appropriation, March 6, 


1922 








$5000.00 


Paid out of Almshouse 
Paid other cities and tov 
Paid account of cities an 
Paid State 
Paid account of State 


ms 

d towns 


$1133.41 
29.21 


$3540.96 

891.69 

29.21 

368.28 

1133.41 




Total expenditure 
Due from State 
Due from cities 


5963 . 28 
1162.62 












Net expenditure 
Balance 


4800.66 
199.34 

$5000.00 






$5000.00 



AIDING MOTHERS WITH DEPENDENT CHILDREN 



Appropriation, March 6, 1922 




$2500.00 


Town cases 




3057.13 


Paid other cities and towns 




291.99 


Paid account other towns 




1475.50 


Total expenditure 


4824.62 


Due from towns 


485.34 




Due from State 


994.13 




Received from State 


499.54 




Received from towns 


539.67 


2518.68 






Net expenditure 


2305.94 


Balance 




194.06 



$2500.00 $2500.00 



66 



CASH REPORT OF ANDOVER TOWN FARM 



Received for board from H. 


F. 


Swan ton 


$125.00 


Received for board from L. 


E. 


Sanborn 


$242 . 00 


Received for farm tools 






115.00 


Received for harnesses 






20.00 


Received for pork 






47.40 


Received for hay 






69.63 


Total receipts 


$619.03 


Paid Town Treasurer to balance 





$619.03 



STATISTICS OF ANDOVER TOWN FARM 

Number of inmates January 1, 1922 9 

Number admitted during year 4 

Number sent to Danvers 1 

Number of deaths 2 

Number of inmates January 1, 1923 10 

Number between 60 and 70 years of age 5 

Number between 70 and 80 years of age 3 

Number between 80 and 90 years of age 2 



67 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



We herewith submit our annual report : 
Number of males assessed 2484. 



Personal estate 


$2616195.00 




Real estate 


9349375.00 








$11965570.00 


Poll tax 


$12420.00 




Tax on personal estate 


73253.46 




Tax on real estate 


261782.50 




Rate of taxation per $1000 - 


- $28.00 


$347455.96 


Number of 






Horses assessed 




463 


Cows assessed 




989 


Neat cattle assessed 




214 


Sheep assessed 




10 


Swine assessed 




90 


Fowl assessed 




16752 


Dwellings assessed 




1922 


Acres of land assessed 




17807 



WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Assessors of Andover 



68 



REPORT OF TREE WARDEN 



This has been a hard year for the Tree Department, but the 
situation has been well taken care of and the trees in the resi- 
dential section of the town are in good condition. 

We have done about fifteen miles of roadside cutting and have 
many miles to do. The work of cutting broken limbs and over- 
hanging brush must be done in order to insure the safety of the 
public. 

There is also a lot of work to be done on the trees in the out- 
lying districts. 

In order to carry on the work of this department. I ask that 
the sum of $6000.00 be appropriated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD H. BERRY 

Tree Warden 



69 



REPORT OF MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 



I herewith submit my report of the Moth Department for year 
ending December 31, 1922. 

The moth situation in Andover certainly looks very favorable. 
There are at least fifty percent less moths than last year, and with 
the same earnest co-operation of the property owners we shall be 
able to keep them on the decrease. 

In order to do the spraying thoroughly this year, we must have 
one new machine as one of the sprayers is beyond repair and one 
more season seems to be the limit for the other one. 

To carry on the work of this department, I ask the sum of 
$9000.00 be appropriated, one new sprayer to be bought out of 
this amount. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD H. BERRY 

Moth Superintendent 



70 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



REPORT OF CHIEF 

To the Board of Selectmen: 
Gentlemen: — 

I herewith submit the report of the Police Department for 
the year ending Dec. 31, 1922. 

Whole number of arrests 216. Males 210 Females 6 

Offenses for Which Arrests Were Made 

Drunk 41 

Drunk and disorderly 3 

Violation of Town By-Law 1 1 

Fishing on the Lord's Day 5 

Violation Fish and Game Law 3 

Violation Liquor Law 4 

Violation of Motor Vehicle Law 94 

Adultery 2 

Insane 6 

Larceny 4 

Assault with dangerous weapon 3 

Assault 8 

Assault on wife 6 

Wandered from home 1 

Vagrancy 3 

Manslaughter 3 

On suspicion 1 

Setting fires without permit 3 

Operating automobile under the influence of liquor 7 

Trespass 3 

Having loaded revolver in possession 2 

Breaking and Entering 1 

Town Traffic Law 2 

71 



Lewdness 2 

Violation Board of Health Law 1 

Default 1 

Obtaining money under false pretense 1 

Total 216 

DISPOSITION OF CASES 

Probation 1 

On File 10 

Discharged 22 

Committed to Danvers Hospital 6 

Committed to State Infirmary, Tewksbury, 3 

Committed to House of Correction 6 

Suspended sentence to House of Correction 6 

Suspended sentence to State Farm 3 

Returned to Parents 3 

Continued for Sentence 7 

Arrested for out of town officers 3 

Held for Grand Jury 4 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Fines paid in lower court $2 192 . 00 

Fines paid in Superior Court 395.00 

Value of Property stolen 1240 . 00 

Value of Property recovered 810.00 

Value of Police Equipment 1800 . 00 

Dead bodies cared for 9 

Doors left opon and secured 98 

SUPERIOR COURT FINDINGS 

No Bill Found 4 

Cases Pending 8 

On Probation 4 

Respectfully submitted 

FRANK M. SMITH 

Chief of Police 
72 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



The trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery submit the following- 
report: — 

The Trustees have held several meetings all of which have been 
well attended. 

The cemetery has been kept up to the same high standard as 
heretofore. 

About $1600.00 has been spent on the East side. Several 
acres have been cleared and seeded, making many available lots. 
Water has been piped up to the top of the hill and the meter 
changed. Over 400 feet of drain tiling has been laid. 

The pines on both sides of the path have been cut down, this 
being necessary on account of many of them having died, and the 
others showed signs of "pine blister." 

Shrubbery will be planted along both banks and thereby 
beautify what has been an ugly site. 

The tomb has proved very satisfactory and has been used a 
great deal this winter. 

WARREN L. JOHNSON, Chairman 

WALTER I. MORSE 

FRED E. CHEEVER 

JOHN W. STARK 

DANIEL H. POOR 

DAVID R. LAWSON 

EVERETT M. LUNDGREN 

Fred E. Chee\er, Clerk of Board of Trustees. 



73 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT 

To the Board of Trustees : 

I herewith submit my annual report as Superintendent of 
Spring Grove Cemetery for the year ending December 31, 1922. 

We have completed the road on the east side of the cemetery 
running from the main entrance to the lower end, so that it 
is now possible to drive around the entire grounds. The water- 
works have been extended nearly to the top of the hill, and a 
drain about 400 feet long has been put in to provide much- 
needed drainage. 

Fifteen lots have been graded ready for immediate use, while 
we have seeded three acres to grass and have also broken up a 
large piece of ground for future development. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED A. SWANTON 

Superintendent 



STATISTICS OF SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 

Number of lots sold as per last report 542 

Number of lots sold in 1922 8 

Total number of lots sold 550 

Total number of single graves sold 197 

Number of interments as per last report , 1587 

Number of interments in 1922 44 

Total number of interments 1631 



74 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S REPORT 



To the Board of Selectmen: — 

Gentlemen: — I hereby submit my report for the time 
beginning November 15, 1921, and ending December 31, 1922. 

Number of cattle inspected 1419 

Number of stables inspected 151 
Number of cows condemned because affected with 

tuberculosis 26 
Number of stables disinfected 20 
Interstate cattle identified and released from quar- 
antine 104 
Number of dogs placed in quarantine and held for 

observation after they had bitten persons 8 

Number of dogs affected with rabies 1 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES H. NEWTON 

Inspector of Animals 



75 



REPORT OF BUILDING INSPECTOR 



To the Board of Selectmen: — 












Gentlemen: — I herewith submit 


my 


report of the Building 


Inspector's Department from December 3 1 


L, 1921 to December 31, 


1922. 












Additions 


21 


Estimated cost 


$40450 


Alterations 


11 




< i 


" 


19500 


Dwellings 


95 




it 


a 


622400 


Two tenements 


7 




t t 


11 


44500 


Garages 


28 




" 


it 


16415 


Camps 


6 




li 


1 1 


4450 


Stores 


6 




it 


n 


19600 


Henhouses 


6 




a 


n 


1700 


Barns 


3 




u 


it 


2200 


Dormitories 


2 




t i 


it 


86000 


Creameries 






i i 


a 


40000 


Baseball cages 






a 


a 


50000 


Office buildings 






" 


i t 


250000 


Recitation buildings 






a 


a 


200000 


Memorial towers 






a 


a 


55000 


Manufactories 






a 


1 1 


451300 


Dyeing and finishing 






a 


a 


120000 


Storehouses 






it 


it 


350000 


Grandstands 






a 


n 


10500 


Almshouses 






a 


n 


29000 


Miscellaneous 


4 




a 


a 


4200 



Total 



200 



$2417215 



Respectfully submitted 

JOSEPH I. PITMAN 

Building Inspector 
76 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY 



Town House 


$47000.00 




Fixtures 


3000.00 




12200 feet land 


15900.00 




Engine house, storehouse and barn 


25000.00 




12200 feet land 


10000.00 


$100900.00 






Memorial Hall 


30000.00 




22318 feet land 


12000.00 


42000.00 






Engine House, Ballard vale 


6000.00 




Shed 


200.00 




H' acre land 


.300.00 


6500.00 






Punchard High School Buildings 


125000.00 




4 acres land 


8000.00 


133000.00 






John Dove Schoolhouse 


25000.00 




Heating plant, Jackson Schoolhouse 


30000.00 




Stowe Schoolhouse 


31000.00 




3% acres land 


6000.00 


92000.00 






Bradlee Schoolhouse, Ballard vale 


23000.00 




1 acre land 


500.00 


23500.00 


Richardson Schoolhouse 


7000.00 


Yi acre land 


400.00 


7400.00 


Indian Ridge Schoolhouse 


17000.00 


1 acre land 


800.00 


17800.00 

, i 






Amount carried forward 


$423100.00 



77 



Amount brought forward 



$423100.00 



West Centre Schoolhouse 
Y2 acre (land 

North District Schoolhouse 
Y2 acre l an d 

Bailey District Schoolhouse 
Y2 acre l an d 

Osgood District Schoolhouse 
Yi acre land 

Old Schoolhouse, Ballardvale 
Y acre l an d 



$5000.00 
300.00 



5000.00 


150. 


00 


3000. 


00 


100.00 


2000. 


00 


100. 


00 


4500. 


00 


500.00 



5300.00 



5150.00 



3100.00 



2100.00 



5000.00 



Almshouse, Carmel Street 


40000.00 




3 J/2 acres land, Carmel Street 


1000.00 




Personal Property at Almshouse 


2100.00 




9 acres land, Burnham Road 


2500.00 


45600.00 






9 acres land, Indian Ridge (gravel pit) 


3000.00 




38 acres land, Carmel Woods Reserva- 






tion 


5700.00 




173751 feet land, Central Park 


15000.00 




Band Stand 


1000.00 




73^2 acres land, Plays tead 


6500.00 




20J/2 acres land, Plays tead, Ballardvale 


1000.00 




41J/2 acres land, Spring Grove Cemetery 


10000.00 




Receiving tomb and toolhouse 


6000.00 


48200.00 


Andover Board of Public Works 




Pipe lines and fountains 


294000.00 




Pumping station and buildings 


42500.00 




Coal shed 


700.00 




3 acres land 


800.00 




Amount carried forward 


$537550.00 



78 



Amount brought forward 

Two reservoirs 
4}/£ acres land 

28 acres land, Boston Ice Co., Haggetts 
Pond 

Personal Property, Water Department 

Workshop, Lewis Street 

Old Stable, Lewis Street 

Barn and shed, Lewis Street 

47467 feet land, Lewis Street 

House, Engineer's 

Pump house, east side of No. Main Street 

Steam road roller 

3 sleds 

1 auto 

3 horses 

Carts and harnesses 

Sewer System (30 acres Filter Beds) 

Punchard School Fund 

Memorial Hall, Permanent Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, John Cornell 
Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, John Byers 
Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, Book Funds 

Memorial Hall Library and furniture 

Memorial Hall Library, Edward Tay- 
lor Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, Isaac E. Gid- 
dings Fund 

Memorial Hall Library, Woman's Chris- 
tian Temperance Union 

Memorial Hall Library, Phillips Fund 



A mount carried forward 





$537550.00 


$16000.00 




2350.00 




2500.00 






358850.00 
8500.00 




1600.00 




1000.00 




3000.00 




3000.00 




3500.00 




5000.00 




4000.00 




75.00 




300.00 




800.00 




300.00 




333225.00 






355800.00 
76854.28 




46600.00 




9371.32 




10000.00 




17400.00 




10000.00 




500.00 




3000.00 




100.00 




3200.00 






100171.32 






$1437725.60 



79 



Amount brought forward 




$1437725.60 


Motor combination Chemical truck 


$5300.00 




Motor combination pump and truck 


9000.00 




Light truck 


800.00 




Hook and ladder 


1000.00 




Two hose wagons 


1000.00 




Hose sled 


60.00 




Four horses 


800.00 




Hay scales 


350.00 


18310.00 






Weights and measures 


350.00 




Fire alarm apparatus 


8000.00 




4000 feet hose 


2500.00 


10850.00 
5000.00 


Moth Department — Sprayers and tools 






$1471885.60 



80 



TOWN OF ANDOVER — JURY LIST 



Abbott, Newton S. 
Armitage, Charles H. 
Averill, George L. 
Bailey, Henry B. 
Bailey, Samuel H. 
Bancroft, William A. 
Bassett, Arthur W. 
Baxter, George H. 
Barrett, Patrick J. 
Boutwell, Everett S. 
Burns, David F. 
Cates, A. Lincoln 
Cannon, Gordon R. 
Carter, Donald W. 
Carter, George M. 
Clark, Herbert 
Chase, Herbert F. 
Cheever, Fred E. 
Cole, Roscoe K. 
Comeau, Arthur N. 
Cole, Joseph F. 
Cutler, Howard A. 
Dove, Percival 
Doyle, Thomas J. 
Disbrow, George W. 
Dunnells, George C. 
Fairweather, James D. 
Flanders, Charles W. 
Fleming, Edward Jr. 
Flint, Edwin M. 
Flaherty, Michael J. 
Garland, George M. 



Carpenter 

Operative 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Retired 

Clerk 

Gardener 

Ins. Collector 

Farmer 

Signal Operator 

Gardener 

Salesman 

Manager 

Farmer 

Carpenter 

Storekeeper 

Bookkeeper 

Carpenter 

Carpenter 

Retired 

Clerk 

Retired 

Fireman 

Farmer 

Watchman 

Gardener 

Restaurateur 

Chauffeur 

Farmer 

Spinner 

Electrician 



River Rd. 

123 Haverhill St. 

Reservation St. 

High Plain Rd. 

Porter Rd. 

Lowell June. 

Hidden Rd. 

43 Lowell St. 

88 Chestnut St. 

Pleasant St. 

Chester St. 

47 Whittier St. 

54 Salem St. 

Balmoral St. 

High Plain Rd. 

Tewksbury St. 

Summer St. 

Bancroft Rd. 

115 Elm St. 

Highland Rd. 

Hidden Rd. 

9 Abbot St. 

Salem St. 

Holt Rd. 

Chandler Rd. 

19 Haverhill St. 

15 Abbot St. 

13 Chestnut St. 

54 Haverhill St. 

Pleasant St. 

River St. 

Prospect Hill Rd. 



81 



Gordon, Alexander 
Greenwood, Milton 
Hannon, Patrick J. 
Hannon, Laurence J. 
Harrington, Daniel F. 
Hill, Charles A. 
Hill, Paul 
Hill, Ira B. 
Holt, George A. 
Holt, John V. 
Holt, George E. 
Holland, Alfred C. 
Hovey, James H. 
Jaques, Robert 
Keane, Mark M. 
Kendall, Frank H. E. 
Kyle, James 
Lawson, John B. 
Lee, Harry F. 
Leslie, David C. 
Lockhead, Robert 
Lynch, Joseph P. 
Mahoney, Timothy J. 
May, George M. 
McDonald, Frank S. 
McGovern, Clarence F. 
Mclntyre, William D. 
Miller, George R. 
Mosher, James R. 
Morrissey, William B. 
Nason, Harry C. 
Newton, Charles M. 
Nolan, Joseph P. 
Noyes, John L. 
O'Connell, Walter J. 
O'Donnell, Hugh F. 
O'Donnell, John A. 
O'Hara, Robert W. 
Petrie, George B. 



Belt Maker 
Farmer 
Retired 

Rubber Worker 
Farmer 
Electrician 
Farmer 

Nigh Watchman 
Carpenter 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Printer 
Carpenter 
Farmer 
Clerk 
Carpenter 
Overseer 
Machinist 
Farmer 
Retired 

Rubber Worker 
Switchman 
Clerk 
Painter 
P. O. Clerk 
Renderer 
Clerk 
Salesman 
Clerk 
Electrician 
Carpenter 
Poultry Business 
Plumber 
Farmer 
Clerk 
Moulder 
Switchman 
Rubber Worker 
Janitor 
82 



82 Poor St. 
Hidden Rd. 
Florence St. 
63 High St. 
Osgood St. 
13 Chestnut St. 
Jenkins Rd. 
Lupine Rd. 
8 Summer St. 
74 Bartlet St. 
66 Chestnut St. 
Lowell June. 
Main St. 
River St. 
Moraine St. 
7 Chestnut St. 
75 Elm St. 
9 Chestnut St. 
Pleasant St. 
Red Spring Rd. 
80 Summer St. 
Tewksbury St. 
Whittier St. 
Main St. 
129 Chestnut St. 
North St. 
Tewksbury St. 
Center St. 
Balmoral St. 
66 Poor St. 
Clark Rd. 
Boutwell Rd. 
7 Cuba St. 
Love joy Rd. 
81 Chestnut 
Center St. 
Marland St. 
Lincoln St. 
Chickering Ct. 



Pike, Warren G. 
Pitman, Joseph I. 
Piatt, Henry W. 
Purcell, James F. 
Reilly, Bernard J. 
Remmes, Joseph T. 
Rennie, George 
Riley, John A. 
Riley, Joseph A. 
Robinson, William C. 
Roggemann, Edward 
Scott, David M. 
Shaw, George 
Shaw, Irving R. 
Sherry, Frank J. 
Sherry, Richard 
Stott, Joseph E. 
Stewart, James 
Taylor, Loren E. 
Todd, Henry 
Trow, Henry J. 
Turner, Patrick 
Tut tie, Benjamin B. 
Valentine, Franklin 
Walker, Salmond C. 
Walker, George D. 
Whitman, David 0. 
Woodhead, Edmund S. 



Farmer 

Carpenter 

Overseer 

Baker 

Gardener 

Electrician 

Farmer 

Retired 

Wool Sorter 

Blacksmith 

Clerk 

Warp Dresser 

Retired 

Wool Sorter 

Pattern Maker 

Moulder 

Clerk 

Retired 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Wool Sorter 

Polisher 

Retired 

Clerk 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Rubber Worker 

Carpenter 



Laurel Lane 

17 Summer St. 

Center St. 

36 Elm St. 

79 Haverhill St. 

Missionary Lane 

Argilla Rd. 

Center St. 

Center St. 

427 No. Main St. 

99 Elm St. 

19 Avon St. 

Andover St. 

High St. 

Andover St. 

Chester St. 

High St. 

Red Spring Rd. 

11 Washington Ave. 

60 Poor St. 

River St. 

Andover St. 

Florence St. 

20 Elm St. 

Chester St. 

Lowell St. 

9 Pine St. 

Corbett St. 



83 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR 



To the Board of Assessors: — 

The following is the Report of the Collector of Taxes for the 
year ending December 30, 1922. 



1919 



Amount as per warrant 

Added to warrant 

Interest 

Collected taxes 

Interest 

Abated 



$189.55 

25.24 

190.33 



$378.28 

1.60 

25.24 



$405.12 $405.12 



1920 



Amount as per warrant 
Added to warrant 
Moth Work 
Interest 
Collected taxes 
Collected Moth Work 
Collected Interest 
Abated 
Uncollected 



$ 


10622.06 




4.67 


f 


89.10 




984.32 


$9302 . 08 




89.10 




984.32 




520.56 




804.09 





$11700.15 $11700.15 



84 



1921 



Amount as per warrant 
Added to warrant 
Moth Work 
Interest 

Collected Taxes 
Collected Moth Work 
Collected Interest 
Abated 
Uncollected 



Amount as per warrant 

Added to warrant 

Moth Work 

Interest 

Amount collected 

Moth work 

Interest 

Abated 

Uncollected 



1922 



$41345.91 

16.47 

289.68 

1100.63 



$25906.92 

289.68 

1100.63 

392.73 

15062.73 



$42752.69 


$42752.69 




$347455.96 




122.64 




3608.66 




168.85 


$299349.10 




3608 . 66 




168.85 




1474.00 




46755.50 





$351356.11 $351356.11 



SUMMARY COLLECTOR'S CASH ACCOUNT, 1922 

Amount Collected and Paid to Town Treasurer 





Taxes 


Moth Work 


Interest 


Total 


1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
Interest on Dep. 


$ 189.55 

9302.08 

25906.92 

299349.10 


89.10 

289.68 

3608.66 


$ 25.24 

984.32 

1100.63 

168.85 

230.20 


$ 214.79 

10375.50 

27297.23 

303126.61 

230.20 




$334747.65 


$3987.44 


$2509.24 


$341244.33 



85 



CORNELL FUND 



Receipts 
Amount of Fund 
Deposited in Savings Banks 
Balance from last year 
Income 


$52.01 
245 . 00 


$5000.00 
5000.00 

297.01 


Expenditures 
For coal and wood 
Cash on hand 


$152.26 
144.75 



$297.01 

JOHN C. ANGUS 
CHARLES N. MARLAND 
W. D. WALKER 

Trustees 



86 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Andover. 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit the report of the Andover 
Fire Department from January 1, 1922 to December 31, 1922. 

During this time the Department has answered 127 bell and 
30 still alarms. 

We have laid 11450 feet of 2^-inch hose, 1760 feet of %-inch 
hose, using 883 gallons of Chemical and 300 feet of ladders. 

Value of buildings and contents where fires have occurred 
$178,100: loss on buildings and contents $24,462, mostly covered 
by insurance. The Department consists of one Combination 
Hose and Chemical, one Combination Hose, Chemical and Pump, 
one Hose Wagon, two Sleds, two Tip Carts, four sets Double 
Harness, one Horse- Drawn Ladder Truck, one Exercise Wagon, 
one Brush Fire Truck, 5000 feet 23^-inch Hose. 

This year the batteries have been replaced with new batteries 
and rack. 

The receipts of the Department for the past year were 
$1,470.05. The appropriation was $23,000, making a total of 
$24,470.05. 

The expenses of the year were $23,967.70, leaving a balance of 
$502.35. 

As we cannot by law use the earnings of the Department, we 
recommend the sum of $24,000. We also recommend the pur- 
chase of a new motor-driven Ladder Truck. 

CHARLES F. EMERSON 

Chief Engineer 



87 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



The duties of the Board of Health for the past year have been 
on the whole of a routine nature. We have received about the 
ordinary number of complaints but far less than usual have been 
of an anonymous nature, which shows that the Public does not 
consider the work of the Board in a partisan spirit, but a Board 
which desires at all times to act in an impartial manner, its first 
object being the public welfare, and not the settlement of diffi- 
culties that are of a personal nature. 

It is said that infant mortality is a fair index of health con- 
ditions in a community. If this be so, then Andover has reason 
to congratulate itself on the work accomplished by its Board of 
Health Nurse and its District Nurse. 

The incidence of catarrhal diseases of an influenzal type during 
the Fall and Winter months has added greatly to the number of 
cases of pneumonia and other serious forms of illness, but feel 
that the work of the Board of Health in its effort to keep up good 
sanitary conditions has had an effect in lowering the mortality 
rate. 

The question of garbage disposal is a serious one, and in so far 
as we are able to advise at this time remains an open question. 
We have had considerable correspondence with cities and towns 
in regard to the matter but have gained but little of particular 
value for the situation in our own town. 

We call particular attention to the report of the active work 
of our nurse, and trust she may have the co-operation of our 
townspeople in the work which we are sure is of inestimable 
value to the town and of additional helpfulness to the Board. 

We have used our best endeavors to further the betterment of 
sewerage conditions in the town as a whole and particularly in 
the Shawsheen district, and we trust that should the new plan 

88 



for direct entrance into the Merrimack river be passed by the 
Legislature it may be immediately adopted by the town. 

We desire to tender our thanks to the Police Department for 
their help in maintaining quarantine and to the physicians of 
the town for their prompt return of vital statistics. 

CHARLES E. ABBOTT, M.D. 
FRANKLIN H. STACEY, Ph.C. 
BANCROFT T. HAYNES 



89 



ACTING MILK INSPECTOR'S REPORT 



To the Board of Health. 

There having been no applications for the position, I have felt 
it my duty to continue as acting milk inspector. It has taken 
considerable time, but I feel that the work is very necessary and 
that some one should do it. 

During the year I have examined 89 samples of milk and of 
these have tested 78 doubtful ones with the Babcock machine. 
My plan has been to first examine with the lactoscope and then 
run the sample if there was any doubt. This year I found more 
samples below standard than ever before. Night and morning 
samples were run on the mixed milk from some dairies and from 
individual cows, thereby showing where the fault was. This 
trouble was remedied by the owner adding cows which gave 
richer milk, thereby bringing the standard up. Found no samples 
of milk sold in Andover which were watered or contained preser- 
vatives. 

In company with one of the state inspectors one dairy was 
visited where we found watered milk. As this milk was not sold 
or offered for sale in Andover the case was prosecuted in Law- 
rence and the man found guilty. 

Paid S3 visits to barns where cows were kept and found con- 
ditions improved. 

Respectfully submitted 

FRANKLIN H. STACEY, Ph.C. 

Acting Inspector 



90 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH NURSE, 
AGENT AND CLERK 



To the Board of Health. 

The past year has been in most respects a very satisfactory 
year as far as freedom from serious epidemics is concerned. 

There have been 328 cases of contagious diseases reported, 
classified and compared with previous years as follows: 





1922 


1921 


1920 


Influenza 


125 




171 


Tuberculosis 


11 


10 


18 


Incephalitis Lethargica 






1 


Typhoid Fever 




6 


2 


Scarlet Fever 


15 


36 


8 


Diphtheria 


16 


21 


15 


Chicken Pox 


14 


25 


20 


Whooping cough 


75 


2 


17 


Measles 


44 


358 


31 


Mumps 


7 


5 


13 


Suppurative Conjunctivitis 




1 




Lobar pneumonia 


14 


4 




Tetanus 








Anterio Poliomyelitis 


2 


3 


1 


German Measles 


1 






Septic Sore Throat 


2 






Ophthalmia Neonatorum 


1 






Gonorrhea 


1 







328 
Deaths from Contagious Diseases 

1922 1921 1922 1921 

Tuberculosis 5 6 Lobar Pneumonia 3 2 

Typhoid Fever 1 Scarlet Fever 1 

Tetanus 2 Diphtheria 3 

Measles 1 

91 



It was most gratifying this year to know that, in spite of the 
fact that in 1921 there was the greatest number of typhoid cases 
for many years, we have had none this year, which shows the 
effect of careful oversight in regard to antiseptic treatment of 
patient and secretions. 

During the year I made 1620 sick calls and many miscel- 
laneous calls as follows: 

Accident, emergency and obstetrical 17 

Erysipelas 19 

Carcinoma 1 

Diphtheria cultures for diagnosis 42 

Diphtheria cultures for release 9 

Dressings 44 

Gangrene 2 

The most striking fact of the year was the decrease in the 
infant mortality. For many years Andover has had what would 
be considered, in view of the type of people and environment, a 
very high death rate among infants: in 1920 we had 25 deaths 
under one year, in 1921, 22, and this year 12, which places Ando- 
ver in a very enviable position. I have made 214 child -welfare 
and prenatal visits. 

I have found by inquiring that there has been a steady de- 
crease in the number of cases of dysentery and diarrhoea in the 
town. This is no doubt due to several reasons; more sewers, 
better sanitary conditions on the premises, connections of 
sewers, and education as to hygiene and care. 

Number of sanitary visits and inspections were 392 for the 
year. Have received during the year 216 complaints which have 
all been investigated. Many were well founded and the nuisances 
were abated. Several were clearly spite cases, while several were 
cases for civil action between the parties interested. In some 
cases it has been necessary to consult the town counsel for advice. 
Several complaints were investigated which were clearly offensive 
to the eye but could not be classified as detrimental to the public 
health. 

In all cases, I have tried to settle by persuasion rather than by 
prosecution, but found it necessary to try one case in court. The 
party was given opportunity to abate the nuisance, which was done. 

92 



I wish to call attention to the fact that the pollution of any 
stream or body of water by depositing therein dead animals or 
decaying vegetable matter is a serious offence. At the time of the 
overflow of Stony Brook last spring many dead animals were re- 
moved from the water course after the water had subsided. Over 
two hundred complaints were received this year in regard to the 
collection or non-collection of garbage. I was unable to advise 
in any way except that all material should be buried or burned. 
In regard to the collection of garbage I have written the Boards 
of Health in many cities and towns and have not thus far re- 
ceived any information which would be of practical value to the 
town of Andover. 

All communicable diseases must be reported to the local 
Board of Health. Any person concealing a contagious or in- 
fectious disease, that is reportable by law, will be prosecuted ac- 
cordingly. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOTTA JOHNSON, R.N. 



INSPECTOR OF SLAUGHTERING 



To the Board of Health. 

Gentlemen : 

During the past year I inspected and passed as suitable 
for food: 

Cattle 1 Sheep 5 

Calves 93 Hogs 112 

Respectfully submitted , 

LOTTA JOHNSON, R.N. 

Inspector 



93 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Liabilities 

Water Bonds, 4% (13000 due 1923) $59000. 00 

Water Bonds, 3^% (3000 due 1923) 32000. 00 

Water Bonds 4 3 4% (4000 due 1923) 40000. 00 

Sewer Bonds 4% (5000 due 1923) 70000. 00 

Sewer Bonds, 5% (2000 due 1923) 36000.00 

High School Loan, 4% (6000 due 1923) 75000.00 
Shawsheen Bridge Loan, 4%% (2500 due 

1923) 10000.00 

Main St. Loan 4^% (20000 due 1923) 100000. 00 



Assets 

Cash , General Fund $5424 . 42 

Cash, Water Loan 6882 . 97 

Cash, Special Sewer Survey 3437.66 

Cash, Main Street Loan 1 140. 29 

Cash, No. Main St., Appropriation 15000.00 

Cash, Soldiers' Memorial Committee 1200.00 

Uncollected taxes 62622.32 

Uncollected Moth Work 905 . 30 

Commonwealth, State Aid 516.00 

Commonwealth, Military Aid 75.00 

Commonwealth, Temporary Aid 1133.41 



$422000.00 



33085.34 



63527.62 



1724.41 



A mount carried forward 



94 



$98337.37 



Amount brought forward 




$98337.37 


Cities, Temporary Aid 


29.21 




Towns, Mothers' Aid 


485.34 




Commonwealth, Mothers' Aid 


994.13 




Sewer Assessments 


11:246.52 




Water Rates due January 1, 1923 


8523.34 




Sinking Funds 


50414.51 


71693.05 
251969.58 


Balance against Town 






$422000.00 



95 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 



Dr. 
Balance Jan. 1, 1922, General Fund 
Balance Jan. 1, 1922, Town Farm Sale 
Balance Jan. 1, 1922, Water Loan 
Balance Jan. 1, 1922 Sewer Loan 
Balance Jan. 1, 1922, War Memorial Book 
Balance Jan. 1, 1922, Town Farm Committee 
Balance Jan. 1, 1922, Soldiers' Memorial Committee 
Commonwealth, Corporation Tax 
Commonwealth, Bank Tax 
Commonwealth, Income Tax, 1919 
Commonwealth, Income Tax, 1920 
Commonwealth, Income Tax, 1921 
Commonwealth, Income Tax, 1922 
Commonwealth, General School Fund 
Commonwealth, Civilian War Poll Tax 
Commonwealth, Reimbursement Land Taxes 
Commonwealth, Soldiers' Exemption 
Commonwealth, Street Railway Tax 
Commonwealth, School Tuition 
Commonwealth, Industrial Schools 
Commonwealth, Mothers' Aid 
Commonwealth, Temporary Aid 
Commonwealth, Public Works, Moth Work 
Commonwealth, Hawkers' Licenses 
Commonwealth, State Aid 
Commonwealth, Military Aid 
Essex County, Dog Tax 
Essex County, Killing Dogs 
Andover National Bank, Notes 
Collector's Department, Taxes 
Collector's Department, Interest on Taxes 
Collector's Department, Moth Work 
Collector's Department, Interest on Deposits 
Board of Public Works, Water Rates 
Board of Public Works, Service Pipe 
Board of Public Works, Refund Water Dept. 
Board of Public Works, Highway Dept. 
Board of Public Works, Sidewalk Assessment 
Board of Public Works, Main St. 

Amount carried forward 



$20526.48 


30145 


.23 


2707 


.38 


2533 


.81 


66 


.90 


300 


.00 


2000 


.00 


23340.47 


9954 


.76 


46 


.25 


323 


.75 


1942 


.50 


17665 


.63 


8711 


.42 


9 


.00 


179.42 


45 


.51 


251 


.97 


719 


.73 


240 


.15 


749 


.33 


318 


.40 


85. 


.43 


112 


.00 


558 


.00 


75, 


.00 


494 


.60 


41 


.00 


275000.00 


334747 . 


65 


2279. 


04 


3987.44 


230. 


20 


31831. 


38 


18495 . 


48 




18 


3041. 


55 


122. 


00 


304. 


74 


$794183.78 



96 



account with the town of Andover 

Cr. 



Orders paid 




Town Officers 


$9866.69 


Town House 


2697.00 


Police Department 


12606.15 


Fire Department 


23967.70 


Brush Fires 


1533.11 


Spring Grove Cemetery 


5103.23 


Almshouse Expenses 


6713.08 


New Almshouse 


41246.07 


Mother's Aid 


4824.62 


Relief Out 


5963 . 28 


Soldiers' Relief 


1441 . 05 


State Aid 


516.00 


Military Aid 


75.00 


Highway Department 


63790.51 


Main Street 


99164.45 


Tree Warden 


8582.84 


Moth Department 


6494.90 


Public Dump 


75.00 


Street Lighting 


8100.42 


Hay Scales 


100.00 


Sewer Department, Maintenance 


3189.59 


Sewer Department, Construction 


8778.82 


Sewer Department, House Connection 


944.48 


Special Sewer, Survey 


1562.34 


Sewer Sinking Funds 


1000.00 


Water Department, Maintenance 


24545.98 


Water Department, Construction 


56131.89 


Water Loan Bonds 


16000.00 


Water Loan Interest 


4475.00 


Water Sinking Funds 


750.00 


Schools 


104623.95 


Park 


1193.54 


Redemption of Sewer Bonds 


7000.00 


Redemption of High School Bonds 


6000.00 


Shawsheen Bridge Loan 


2500.00 


Interest 


14124.81 


Board of Health 


3603.44 


Amount carried forward 


$559284.94 



97 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 

Dr. 

Amount brought forward $794183 . 78 

Sewer Department, Assessments 3410.46 

Sewer Department, Interest on Assessments 20. 14 

Sewer Department, House Connections 1530.43 

Town House, Rentals 640.50 

Fire Department, Use of horses, etc. 1047.05 

Fire Department, Fire Alarm Boxes 300.00 

Fire Department, Sale of Engine 75 . 00 

Fire Department, Liability Ins. 48.00 

Almshouse 619.03 

Towns, Mothers' Aid 810.67 

Spring Grove Cemetery, Sale and Care of Lots 2647 . 14 

Outside Relief, Reimbursement 473.50 

Hay Scales 50.00 

W. C. Crowley, Sealer's Fees 97.54 

School Dept., Tuition and Supplies 247.50 

George A. Higgins, Town Clerk's Fees 225.45 

Old Schoolhouse, Ballardvale, Rents 250.00 

Cunningham Property, Rent 6.00 

Trial Justice Court, Fines 1180.50 

Tree Warden's Dept. 260. 00 

Board of Health, Licenses 33.50 

Board of Health, Town of Middleton 21 . 09 

Phillips Academy, Street Lighting 230. 00 

Show Licenses 25 . 00 

Peter Dugan, Cunningham Buildings 200.00 

Auto Dealers, Licenses 62.50 

Druggist License 1 . 00 

Albert Hall & Clyde White, release 1 . 00 

Sinking Fund, Water Bond Redemption 10000.00 

Water Loan Bonds 40000 . 00 

Water Loan Bonds, Premium and Interest 393 . 93 

Main Street Loan 100000. 00 

Main Street Loan, Premium and Interest 962.50 

Andover National Bank, Interest on Deposits 1240.09 

Andover National Bank, Almshouse Fund 1028.87 

Smart & Flagg, Cancelled Insurance 15.58 



Total Receipts 



$962337.75 



98 



account with the town of Andover 



Cr. 

A mount brought forward 

Miscellaneous 

Andover Post No. 8 American Legion 

Memorial Hall Library 

Memorial Hall Library, Dog Tax 

Retirement of Veterans 

War Memorial Book 

Memorial Day 

Post 99, G. A. R. 

Printing and Stationery 

Insurance 

Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital 

Election and Registration 

Cunningham Property 

Pilgrim Monument 

Memorial Committee 

County Tax 

Commonwealth, Bank Tax 

Commonwealth, Corp. Tax 

Commonwealth, State Tax 

Commonweal th , Highway Tax 

Commonwealth, War Poll Tax 

Andover National Bank, Notes 

Total expenditures 

Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1923 
General Fund 
Water Loan 
Special Sewer Survey 
Main St. Loan 
No. Main St. Appropriation 
Soldiers' Memorial Committee 



$559284.94 


792 


.39 


528 


.28 


3000.00 


494 


.60 


300 


.00 


5 


.81 


550 


.00 


100.00 


1959 


.01 


4579 


.49 


1371 


.87 


1313 


15 


3000 


.00 


120. 


.00 


800.00 


19151, 


,19 


2408 


,92 


301 


,88 


24000. 


00 


2738. 


,88 


7452. 


00 


295000. 


00 


$929252.41 


5424. 


42 


6882. 


97 


3437. 


66 


1140. 


29 


15000. 


00 


1200. 


00 


$962337.75 



99 



Richardson Fund — Shawsheen Village School 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1922 $1447.33 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 73 . 24 

$1520.57 

Cr. 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank $1520 . 57 

$1520.57 

Draper Fund — School 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1922 $1083.75 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 54 . 82 

— — $1138.57 

Cr. 
Deposit, Andover Savings Bank $1138.57 $1138.57 

— $1138.57 

Edward Taylor Fund — Fuel 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1922 $301.60 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 15 . 24 

$316.84 

Cr. 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank $316.84 

— — — $316.84 



Varnum Lincoln Spelling 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1922 
Andover Savings Bank, interest 


Fund 

$543.40 
26.47 


$569.87 
$569.87 


Cr. 
H. C Sanborn, Supt. of Schools 
Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 


$20.00 
549.87 



100 



Isaac Giddings Burial Ground Fund 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1922 $1000.00 
Andover Savings Bank, interest 50.62 


$1050.62 
$1050.62 


Cr. 
F. H. Foster, Treas., South Cemetery 
Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 


50.62 
1000.00 



Dr. Edward C. Conroy School Fund 

Dr. 
Balance, January 1, 1922 $250.00 

$250.00 

Cr. 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank $250.00 

$250.00 

Cemetery Fund 

Perpetual Care 

Dr. 
Balance, January 1, 1922 $28003.87 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 1456.21 

Deposits for Perpetual Care 2275 . 00 

$31735.08 



Cr. 

Spring Grove Cemetery, for care of lots $410. 00 

Private Cemeteries, for care of lots 712 . 00 

Deposits, Andover Savings Bank 30613 . 08 



$31735.08 



101 



AUDITORS' CERTIFICATE 



We have examined the accounts of the several town officers 
and find them correctly cast, with satisfactory vouchers for all 
payments. 

The Town Treasurer has on deposit in Andover National 
Bank and cash on hand : 



General Fund 


$5424.42 


Water Loan 


6882.97 


Special Sewer Survey 


3437.66 


Main Street Loan 


1140.29 


No. Main Street Appropriation 


15000.00 


Soldier's Memorial Committee 


1200.00 




$33085.34 



JOHN S. ROBERTSON 
WALTER H. COLEMAN 
HARRY SELLARS 

A uditors 



102 



PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 



Rev. CHARLES W. HENRY, President 
HARRY H. NOYES, Clerk and Treasurer 

Rev. E. VICTOR BIGELOW MYRON E. GUTTERSON 
Rev. NEWMAN MATTHEWS FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 
EDMOND E. HAMMOND JOHN H. CAMPION 



103 



REPORT OF TREASURER 



PRINCIPAL FUND 






January 1, 1922 






Cash in Banks $10911.21 




Real Estate, Mortgages and Bonds 


65943.07 




Transferred from Income Account 


145.72 








$77000.00 


December 31, 1922 






Cash in banks 


6911.53 




Real estate, mortgages and bonds 


70088.47 


77000.00 






January 1, 1922 






Cash in banks 


10911.21 




Mortgages paid during year 


5695.00 




Transferred from income account 


145.72 


16751.93 


December 31, 1922 




Invested in new mortgages and bonds 


9840.40 




Cash in bank 


6911.53 


16751.93 


INCOME 




January 1, 1922 






Cash in bank 


1267.72 




Interest and rents 


4331.15 


5598.87 


EXPENDITURES 




N. C. Hamblin, Principal 


800.00 




Helen DeM. Dunn, instructor 


1550.00 




Hazel Underwood, instructor 


1600.00 




Rogers & Angus, insurance 


25.00 




Andover National Bank — box rent 


5.00 





Amount carried forward 



$3980.00 



104 



Amount brought forward $3980.00 

Harry H. Noyes, treasurer 200.00 

Transferred to principal account 145.72 

Interest on bonds 59 . 00 

Balance 1214.15 



BARNARD FUND 




January 1, 1922 




Cash in bank 


25.50 


Dividends 


40.00 


Prizes awarded 




First 


20.00 


Second 


12.00 


Third 


8.00 


December 31, Cash in bank 


25.50 


DRAPER FUND 




January 1, 1922 




Cash in bank 


1443.22 


Dividends 


71.52 


Scholarship — Dorothy M. Ryley 


30.00 


Minerva Ramsdell 


60.00 


Cash in And over Savings Bank 


1424.74 


GOLDSMITH FUND 




January 1, 1922 




Cash in Bank 


263.47 


Dividends 


13.32 


Prizes awarded 


10.00 


December 31, 1922 




Cash in Andover Savings Bank 


266.79 



5598.87 



65.50 



65.50 



1514.74 



1514.74 



276.79 



276.79 

HARRY H. NOYES, Treasurer 
105 



REPORT OF WAR MEMORIAL COMMITTEE 



Andover, Mass., Feb. 15, 1923 
This Committee was appointed in March, 1921, to consider 
plans for the taking of a suitable site to provide for the con- 
struction of a worthy memorial to citizens of Andover who 
served in the World War, to be so located as to possibly form part 
of a civic center in connection with such further additions and 
improvements as the Jown may later approve. 

Such a commission necessitated study of some general ques- 
tions of town planning and consideration of the needs of Andover 
in the next twenty-five years to provide for natural expansion 
and for the development of the finest and soundest town spirit. 
We reported in February, 1922, that we had found everywhere 
a desire for a better type of memorial than those selected com- 
monly in the past, with a very general feeling that careful thought 
should be given to the whole subject and hasty conclusions 
avoided. In considering the future needs of Andover our studies 
had then shown that a new Public Library, a larger and better 
Town Hall, better quarters for the town officials and for com- 
munity and civic activities would soon be necessary; and that 
there would be many advantages in grouping such important 
public buildings as undoubtedly must be erected in the near fu- 
ture with the War Memorial as the central feature, thus bring- 
ing together the main public interests in a well worked out town 
center. 

In order to accomplish this result it is necessary to adopt today 
a general plan of development into which each step as made year 
after year will fit, so that eventually the completed work will 
form an harmonious whole and be of large permanent benefit 
to the town. The Committee, therefore, sought expert advice 
and after thorough investigation employed Mr. John Nolen, 
Town Planner of large experience, and his associate, Mr. Philip 
W. Foster, a former Andover boy. We discussed with them the 

106 



work we had done and the general lines of development which we 
believed should be followed and asked them to apply their 
wide experience to the working out of these ideas to meet the 
conditions in Andover in the best possible way. They have 
done this thoroughly, their report is attached and a careful 
reading of it is urged. 

The main objects it is desired to accomplish are to provide 
additional highways and open spaces to meet the needs of 
modern traffic, secure excellent sites and settings for future 
public and semi-public buildings and to furnish attractive space 
for business expansion sure to come with the rapid growth of the 
town. This can be done readily by giving Bartlet Street better 
outlets at each end and by opening up some space on Park 
Street. The plan attached shows the proposal clearly and the 
report of Messrs. Nolen and Foster explains the details and gives 
sound reasons for the development proposed. 

If this general scheme of replanning is adopted we recommend 
that the whole broad improvement be dedicated as the Andover 
War Memorial and then that a finely designed tower, fountain or 
other distinct memorial of like character, be set up on the ex- 
cellent site which would be provided by the division of Bartlet 
Street, to bear witness permanently that it is in this large way 
that Andover is to recall forever the acts of its citizens who have 
served in the wars of the nation. Obviously the exact form of 
this special memorial cannot be determined until the main 
features of the whole development are decided upon. It is believed 
that this distinct memorial should be mainly provided by 
private subscriptions so that all may have a direct part in it. 

It will be seen that our aim has been to look into the future in a 
comprehensive way so that each step in growth and new con- 
struction will form part of a final broad plan. If growth occurs 
without such an outlook and in the ordinary piecemeal way the 
result will fall far short of the possibilities and with no ultimate 
gain financially. It is, however, appreciated that with the large 
expenditures probably necessary this year, it would not be wise 
to provide for any outlay for this plan at present. The Commit- 
tee, nevertheless, has given consideration to the methods which 
could be adopted for carrying out such a plan. We find that 
under the so-called excess condemnation act, the town could 

107 



obtain adequate authority from the Legislature for the carrying 
out of the plan in such a way as to control the entire development 
and prevent the construction of unsightly buildings which would 
spoil the whole effect. The land not used by the town can then 
be sold under reasonable restrictions so as to defray ultimately 
a considerable part of the cost of the improvements. 

The Committee believes it for the best interest of Andover 
to now adopt the broad plan of development described herein 
and provides for carrying it out as the needs of the town require 
and as the finances of the town justify expenditures for such 
work. We hope the citizens will see the great advantages that 
such a development would be to Andover and give every possible 
help to insure the final success of the whole scheme. 

Recommendations 

The following action is advised at the March meeting: 

1. To approve the general plan of development proposed 
and make it the policy of the town to carry it out at such 
times and in such ways as the voters of the town decide from 
year to year and 

2. To continue a Committee to work out the best method 
of putting the plan into effect gradually, petition the Legis- 
lature for any powers the town may need to act definitely, 
present an estimate of the cost to insure the final carrying 
out of the plan, and suggest the specific form of the distinct 
memorial when the main features of the development are 
established. 

Our town now has the opportunity to adopt a far-sighted plan 
for guiding its future growth so that Andover will continue to 
be one of the most beautiful towns in New England. Expansion 
may be made to harmonize with natural advantages while pro- 
viding the best possible conditions for modern traffic, business 
activities and community cooperation and all with ultimate 
financial gain to the town because it provides for the most 
effective utilization of the center areas. This is Andover's 
chance to build in the wisest ways for the years to come. It 
makes the War Memorial idea the moving force in giving Ando- 

108 



ver that type of development which will be a constant aid to a 
finer town life and to the maintenance of the best Andover spirit. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(Signed) E. V. FRENCH, Chairman 
JOHN F. O'CONNELL 
HENRY A. BODWELL 
BURTON S. FLAGG 
E. BARTON CHAPIN 
WALTER M. LAMONT 

War Memorial Commitee 

Prof. Forbes took active part in much of the Committee work 
but due to absence in Europe has been unable to consider and 
sign this report. 

The details of the plan are described fully in the report of 
Messrs. Nolen and Foster which follows: 

15 February, 1923. 
Andover War Memorial Committee 
Andover, Massachusetts 
Gentlemen: 

After the Civil War a great wave of public feeling swept over 
the country and the love for those who had fallen in the struggle 
and the appreciation of their sacrifice was expressed in lasting 
form in Soldiers' Monuments and Memorial Halls. These dotted 
the country over but unfortunately, for the most part, were far 
from artistic and decidedly unworthy to express the sentiment 
for which they stood. They were located on open lots easily 
acquired or on triangles at street intersections without regard for 
the developments on the surrounding properties. In spite of this 
lesson of the past, many of our communities are today making 
similar mistakes in the placing of their Memorial Buildings and 
Monuments. It was largely to prevent just such conditions, the 
result of hurried decisions, that induced the French Government 
to pass an act prohibiting the erection of monuments until 
ten years after the close of the World War. 

The decision of the Andover Committee to study the possibili- 
ties in and the probable future development of the center of the 

109 



town before making its recommendations as to the exact form, 
character and location of the proposed war memorial for Andover 
is one that should be highly commended. It is with this two-fold 
purpose in mind that we have made our study of the situation 
and have prepared plans that would not only show what Andover 
has in store if properly and thoughtfully developed to cope with 
the future, but also suggests various opportunities for the loca- 
tion and construction of a war memorial that would be a contin- 
ual source of pride and inspiration to the generations that are to 
come. Whether the final decision is for a memorial building, a 
worth-while fountain, a monument, a memorial open space or 
square, it can be placed with an assurance that it will fit into and 
become a part of the Andover of the future, and be a permanent 
institution. 

The following brief report, on the question of a war memorial 
and the relation of its possible location to future developments in 
the center of the Town of Andover, is submitted to your commit- 
tee in further explanation and argument to the plans that have 
been prepared. 

Andover is one of the oldest towns in the state, having been 
incorporated in 1646. The center of the village of over two 
centuries ago is practically the same center of today, but the 
conditions and requirements of 1923 are considerably different 
from anything that was even dreamed of in the early days. 

In the hundred years from 1800 to 1900 Andover grew slowly 
from a small village to a town of 6,813, but in the last few years 
since the war, has fast been approaching the small city class. 
There is some difference of opinion as to the exact figure for the 
present population but 9,000 seems to be a fair assumption; 
the final official 1920 census figure being 8,268. 

Not so very many years back, well this side of the earliest 
memories of the oldest inhabitant, Elm Square and Main Street 
were open and spacious places free from car tracks and motor 
trucks and adequate for all the traffic of the time. Hitching- 
posts and rings were plentiful and "parking space " easy to find at 
almost any time except perhaps on Town Meetings day or the 
night of the minstrel show. 

Also in those days there was an open park space in the center 
of town, a green triangle in front of the Elm House, where con- 

110 



certs given by the local band and other entertainments were held, 
not to mention the itinerant fakir who enlivened the life of the 
Square almost every week during the summer with his small 
shows and exhortations to buy rattle-snake oil or handkerchiefs 
for the whole family for the sum of twenty-five cents. 

Those days have gone and with them the only real open green 
space in the center of town. The streets are no longer adequate 
to take care of modern traffic, the business section of town is 
cramped and seeks an outlet and the entire structure is in need 
of replanning and reconstruction ; not a radical unheaval of exist- 
ing conditions and present investments but a gradual expansion 
and growth along definite thought out lines to meet the needs of 
the time and the demands of the future. 

There is a present tendency in modern life toward decentraliz- 
ation. The automobile has made it practicable for people to 
live at a distance from their work and this trend is particularly 
noticeable in crowded industrial centers. Andover is more and 
more destined to become a residential center for people whose 
business is in Lawrence and Boston. The nearness to Lawrence 
and the development of Shawsheen Village will cause a rapid 
growth in population in the next few years and any plans for the 
future should look forward to a community of 18,000 to 20,000 
in the next twenty-five years. To take care of this coming 
growth expansion will have to be made in all directions, wider 
streets, new residential property, new streets, more shops, and 
schools, churches and public buildings. 

Topographically the center of Andover is peculiar. The present 
center is on the edge of a sharp hillside, so that expansion of the 
business to the north along Main Street or west on Essex or 
Central Streets is practically out of the question. Certain 
business developments have taken place along these streets but a 
business district will tend to avoid such conditions and is seldom 
successful under them unless other possibilities are lacking. 
Expansion to the south is far from desirable because of the 
present high-class residence property here located. The intro- 
duction of the present commercial garage into this section is 
without doubt a mistake as viewed from the standpoint of the 
district and the town as a whole. 

The only opportunity then for business to expand in a satis- 
Ill 



factory way, is to the east. Here fortunately we find ideal con- 
ditions and real possibilities. The entire area bounded by Elm 
Street, Main Street, Punchard Avenue, Whittier, Park and 
Florence Streets has a street elevation that varies only about 
eight feet, while the elevations at Park and Main Streets, Park 
and Florence Streets, Whittier and Bartlet Streets and Chestnut 
and Main Streets has a difference of less than one foot. Such 
a condition is in sharp contrast with the grade of Essex Street, for 
example, where there is a difference of 70 feet between the Rail- 
road Station and Elm Square. 

This particular area is also in the direction of the future growth 
of the town and will be nearer the future center of population. 
The large acreage holdings of both Abbot Academy and Phillips 
Academy to the south interrupt a continuous growth in this 
direction, and beyond, over the top of the hill, there is a tendency 
to hold the property in larger tracts. The steep river valley to 
the west and northwest, with its railroad and mill development, 
discourages expansion in this direction. North of the town, how- 
ever and east are large tracts suitable and available for housing 
purposes, and these lands are bound to come into development 
within the next few years. Moreover this section of town is 
most convenient to Lawrence and to Shawsheen Village. 

Again, another factor that makes this Park Street a desirable 
one in whicn to do replanning is the low assessed value of both 
land and buildings, and the lack of any structure of real value. 
Here it is possible to effect street changes that will not only 
greatly improve general traffic conditions but will produce better 
business property and make available for intensive use land that 
is now idle property and practically inaccessible. 

Therefore, we believe that it is within this area that the future 
of Andover is held, and in planning for its development the first 
consideration has been circulation. 

There is only one traffic outlet to the south from Andover 
center, Main Street being the only street running through this 
south section of town. Over this highway is a steady stream of 
traffic from the Boston Metropolitan District to Lawrence, 
Manchester and Haverhill and beyond to the mountains and 
beaches. 

What Andover needs to relieve this situation on the Main 

112 



Street, at the center is a local parallel street that will divert a 
part of the through traffic and provide for the local use about 
town. Bartlet Street is such a parallel street but without proper 
connection to either end. Therefore the problem is to replan 
in such a way as to give it an outlet to north and south and there- 
by provide for the present Haverhill traffic and much of the 
future High Street traffic due to Shawsheen Village as well as 
local business that now passes back and forth through the 
Square. 

The plan proposed divides Bartlet Street at Park Street, one 
branch extending east connecting with Elm Street at Florence 
Street, the other extending west connecting with Elm Street at 
High Street. The first would pick up the Haverhill traffic and 
the second connect with the upper road to Shawsheen Village and 
Lawrence. At the southern end of Bartlet Street, traffic would 
reach Main Street through Chapel Avenue and there should also 
be provided an outlet to the east passing south of Rabbits Pond 
and continuing to Highland Road and Salem Street. 

As a further improvement in the local circulation system, we 
have shown on the plan two streets leading out from the general 
center of town and opening up the territory to the southeast, an 
area extending from upper Bartlet Street around to Chestnut 
Street that is practically unbuilt upon. The first of these is an 
extension from Whittier Street following the valley at the rear 
of the School properties and passing east of Rabbits Pond and 
connecting with Salem Street. The other proposal is to build a 
double parkway street with the brook retained in a central 
planting area, from the Park to Highland Road and on to Salem 
Street, following for the most part the natural brook valley. 

This opening up of Bartlet Street together with the new 
streets leading into this area will form a business district extend- 
ing from Elm to Chestnut Streets arid from Florence to Main 
Streets. The frontage available for business use would be about 
twice that now occupied which would be not an excessive pro- 
vision for the future population. A district such as this for 
business use would have many advantages over the present one- 
street arrangement. 

To open up the center of the proposed business district and 
provide adequate street room and an appropriate setting for the 

113 



public buildings proposed we have shown Bartlet Street widened 
to 100 feet between Chestnut and Park Streets, and have shown 
a similar treatment south from Park Street just to the rear of the 
present Town Hall. The problem of providing adequate parking 
space for automobiles in the center of our towns and cities is 
already one of first magnitude. It presents itself in two forms, 
first, the provision for the ordinary daily business and the 
parking of cars of those whose offices and shops are in the central 
district, and second, provision for adequate parking for machines 
on special occasions. Both of these conditions would be well 
provided for in the proposed plan and at the same time the 
areas used for parking would be out of line of through traffic. 

The triangle formed by the two new streets and Elm Street 
would become the social center of the town. The dominating 
site, at the point of the triangle, on the axis of Bartlet Street, 
should be reserved for a future important Public Building. This 
location is an exceptional one and a building here located would 
have a dominant place in the life of the town. The Free Church 
now occupies a part of this area and it is suggested that the lots 
to the east and west would be used for social, fraternal or other 
semi-public buildings which would tie in with the new Masonic 
location at the junction of Elm and High Streets. 

To the east of Bartlet Street we have shown locations for other 
public buildings which would connect up the buildings on the 
triangle just mentioned with the Park and the school buildings 
on Bartlet Street. The sites shown would be suitable for a new 
Fire Station, Post Office or other similar building. There is" 
some feeling that the present Town Hall will in years to come be 
inadequate and could then be torn down and the future Town 
Hall be a part of this proposed building group. The present site 
would be left open and become a part of the business center. 
Two other well located sites for public or semi-public buildings 
are shown, one at the head of Park Street, where we have sug- 
gested a building of this character, and the other at the head of 
Florence Street on which site we have suggested a possible future 
Auditorium. If it was felt that an Auditorium was not neces- 
sary the same site could be turned over for commercial purposes 
and would be an excellent location, handy to the center of town, 
for a public garage. 

114 



Another excellent location for a public building is the site on 
Bartlet Street at the head of Whittier Street. This property 
would be especially suitable for a Library because of its nearness 
to the schools. 

Other schemes for the grouping of public buildings in Andover 
have been proposed in the past and have been based usually 
on the idea of acquiring a block and grouping the buildings 
thereon. Such an arrangement provides open space for the 
buildings and gives an opportunity for bringing the various units 
into harmony. It does not, however, improve the circulation 
problem nor does it give opportunity for placing buildings at the 
end of streets and thus obtain the advantages of a long vista. 
Most public buildings have to be seen at such short distances 
that much of the effect and beauty is lost. 

A word as to the cost of the proposed schemes as based on the 
total assessed valuations of the property that would be affected is 
necessary. The assessed value of land and buildings affected by 
the proposed scheme between Elm and Park Streets and east to 
Florence Street is $60,950. This does not include the church 
property which of course would not be disturbed. The land and 
buildings affected by the proposed public building property east 
from Bartlet Street and including the Auditorium site is $38,050. 
The property on the west side of Bartlet Street, from Chestnut 
Street to Park Street, has an assessed valuation of $21,400. The 
town property including the Fire Station and the town yard is 
valued at $50,000. This makes a total valuation for all land and 
buildings, not now the property of the town, affected by the 
proposed scheme, of $120,400. 

In return for this expenditure the town would obtain building 
sites for all the important buildings which will be needed for many 
years. In addition there would be for sale a site for the Post 
Office, and two other large lots suitable for fraternity or similar 
semi-public buildings, and above all approximately 1,100 front 
feet of store and shop property. Using the same assessed valu- 
ation figures as are used for similarly located property, the new 
frontage would be worth, on an average, at least $60.00 per front 
foot. In contrast with these figures it would be well to note that 
the block bounded by Chestnut, Bartlet and Main Streets and 
Punchard Avenue has an assessed valuation of $123,100, and that 

115 



this area, under previous plans, was all to be used for public 
property. Had this scheme been carried out it would have added 
very little value that could have been assessed directly against 
adjacent properties. 

In carrying out such a scheme as the one we have proposed for 
the development of the center of Andover it will have to be under- 
taken in a broad comprehensive way looking toward the future, 
and the keeping in mind advantages that will come to the town 
as a whole. To do such a piece of work in a small way and with 
a narrow outlook, compromising with petty local interests would 
almost surely result in a failure, or at best only a partial success. 
Probably the best method of procedure would be to have the 
work done by a commission with sufficient power and authority 
to handle all the details of the problem. 

If Andover can carry out this proposed plan of development, 
the center can easily become one of the most attractive business 
locations in the State. With such a scheme everything that is 
well done as years go on will add to the beauty of the town, and 
any memorial, here erected, will for all time be in a setting 
worthy of its character and meaning. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PHILIP W. FOSTER 
JOHN NOLEN 



116 



TOWN WARRANT 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ss.: To either of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town w 10 are qualified 
to vote in elections and in town affairs to meet and assemble at 
the designated polling places in Precincts One, Two, Three and 
Four, viz: The Town House in Precinct One; the Old School 
House, Ballardvale, in Precinct Two; the Boys' Club House, 
Shawsheen Village, in Precinct Three; and the Phillips Club 
House, School Street, in Precinct Four, in said Andover, on 
Monday, The Fifth Day of March, 1923, at 6 o'clock a.m., 
to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To elect a Moderator for one year, Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for one 
year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, 
one member of the Board of Assessors for three years, three 
members of the School Committee for three years, one member 
of the Board of Public Works for three years, one member of 
the Board of Health for three years, three Auditors of Accounts 
for one year, three Constables for one year, one Trustee of 
Memorial Hall Library for seven years, one Trustee of Memorial 
Hall Library for six years (to fill vacancy), one Tree Warden 
for one year and all town officers required by law to be elected 
by ballot. Also to take action on the following questions: 
Shall licences be granted for the sale of certain non-intoxicating 
beverages in this town? "Shall the town petition for the instal- 
lation of an accounting system by the Commonwealth? (This 
question is submitted under the provisions of Chapter 516, 
Acts of 1922.)" 

117 . 



All to be voted for on one ballot. The polls will be open 
from 6 o'clock a.m. to 5 o'clock p.m. 

After final action on the preceding Article one, the said meeting 
shall stand adjourned by virtue of Section 20, Chapter 39, of 
the General Laws, to Monday, March 12th, at 1.30 o'clock p.m. 
at the Town Hall, then and there to act upon the following 
Articles, namely: 

Article 2. — To elect all other officers not required by law to 
be elected by ballot. 

Article 3. — To determine what sums of money shall be appro- 
priated for Almshouse Expenses, Relief out of Almshouse, 
Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children, Board of Health, 
Brush Fires, Fire Department, Hay Scales, Highway Depart- 
ment, Insurance, Interest, Memorial Hall Library, Memorial 
Day, Post 99, G.A.R., Miscellaneous, Parks and Playsteads, 
Police, Printing and Stationery, Election and Registration, 
Public Dump, Retirement of Veterans, Redemption of Water, 
Sewer, High School, Main Street and Shawsheen Bridge Bonds, 
Schools, Sewer Maintenance, Sewer Sinking Funds, Soldiers' 
Relief, Spring Grove Cemetery, State Aid, Street Lighting, 
Town Officers, Town House, Tree Warden, Moth Department, 
Water Maintenance, Construction and Sinking Funds, Andover 
Post No. 8, American Legion, and other town charges and 
expenses. 

Article 4. — To see if the town will vote to appropriate the 
sum of $6000.00 to pay the unpaid bills contracted by the Alms- 
house Building Committee, and to build a combination Barn 
and Garage, on petition of the Selectmen. 

Article 5.- — To see if the Town will vote to purchase a com- 
bination truck and ambulance for the use of the Police Depart- 
ment and appropriate the sum of $700.00 for the same, on 
petition of the Selectmen. 

Article 6. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$14,157.15 in addition to the balance on hand of $1140.29 to pay 
for bills due for extra work done in the reconstruction of Main 
Street, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 7. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$10,000.00 for granolithic sidewalks on either side of Main 

■ 118 



Street and do necessary grading, on petition of the Board of 
Public Works. 

Article 8. — To see if the Town will accept the provisions of 
an Act of the Legislature of 1923 "Authorizing the Town of 
Andover to construct an Outfall Sewer for the Disposal of its 
Sewage." 

Also to see if the Town will vote to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town in the aggregate amount of one hundred and fifty thousand 
($150,000.) dollars for the purpose of paying the necessary 
expenses and liabilities incurred under this act, the indebtedness 
under this act to be in excess of the statutory limit, but, except 
as otherwise provided therein, subject to Chapter Forty-four 
of the General Laws, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 9. — To see if the Town will authorize and direct the 
School Committee to petition the General Court of 1923 for 
authority to borrow the sum of two hundred and sixty-eight 
thousand ($268,000.) dollars outside the statutory limit of in- 
debtedness, by bond issue or otherwise, for the following purposes. 

To grade and loam the lot and to build and equip a new 
grammar school building, to be located on the land given by the 
American Woolen Company and accepted by the town, situated 
at the junction of and between Corbett Street and Magnolia 
Avenue, on petition of the School Committee. 

Article 10. — To see if the Town will vote to purchase a Motor 
Ladder Truck for the Fire Department and appropriate a sum 
of $15,000.00 for the same, on petition of William C. Crowley 
and others. 

Article 11 — To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to extend the water main from the present termina- 
tion of same on Corbett Street at premises of Antonio Catanzaro, 
a distance of seventeen hundred (1700) feet along said Corbett 
Street to the main entrance to the Sacred Heart Cemetery, 
and appropriate a sum of money sufficient therefor, on petition 
of Edward Topping and others. 

Article 12. — To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of 
$10,000.00 to lay a 6-inch water main on Chandler Road, to the 
residence of William F. Trauschke and others, on petition of 
William F. Trauschke and others. 

119 



Article 13. — To see if the Town will accept the provisions 
of Section 85 of Chapter 32 of the General Laws of Massachu- 
setts entitled "Pensions for Policemen and Firemen," on petition 
of Colver J. Stone and others. 

Article 14 — To hear and act on the report of the War Memo- 
rial Committee. 

Article 15 — To see if t le Town will deed back to the Boston & 
Maine Railroad a certain piece of land situated in Ballard Vale, 
deeded to the town from the said Boston & Maine Railroad 
September 16th, 1871, on the express condition that neither the 
land nor the building thereon be used for any other purpose 
than housing fire apparatus, on petition of the Selectmen. 

Article 16. — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 17. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in anticipation of the revenue of the 
current financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

Article 18. — To determine what disposition shall be made of 
unexpended appropriations. 

Article 19. — To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

Article 20. — To determine the amount of money to be raised 
by taxation the ensuing year. 

Article 21.- — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof, seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this twenty-first day of February, 
A.D. 1923. 

WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Selectmen of A ndover 



120 



RECOMMENDATIONS OF FINANCE 
COMMITTEE 



Efficient work by the committee is rendered difficult by the 
crowding of important questions of town policy into a very few 
days before the date on which our report must be printed. 

Proper investigation and discussion of the problems pre- 
sented is impossible, and as we are expected to make definite 
recommendations to the town, it follows that our report on 
matters of large import must be the result of hasty judgment 
rather than careful deliberation. This is unfair alike to the town, 
those presenting the problems, and to the Finance Committee. 

We have called attention to this matter in previous reports 
and as a corrective measure had intended to insert an article 
in the warrant for an amendment to the by-laws, requiring all 
information on articles to be presented at least one month prior 
to the town meeting, but we find that proposed amendments to 
town by-laws require the approval of the Attorney General and it 
was not possible to secure his approval before the town meeting. 

It would be of great value to the town to have all budgets, and 
plans, presented earlier than this so that the complete Town 
Report could be issued a month before the Town Meeting. 
Thus, the whole business of the town could be studied by the 
voters and intelligent conclusions drawn. We hope that with 
the co-operation of all Town Departments this may be accom- 
plished. 

Following are the recommendations of the Finance Committee 
on the matters submitted to it:. 



121 



Almshouse $6600.00 

This is $600 more than appropriated last year 
and is added this year for the reason that 
almshouse receipts like the receipts of all town 
departments, must now be returned to the 
general treasury. 

Almshouse Relief out 

This is the same amount as was appropriated 
last year. 

Aiding Mothers with Dependent children 

Board of Health 

Brush Fires 

Elections and Registration 

Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital 

This is the amount the town of And over has 
been assessed by the County for running ex- 
penses of this institution. 

Fire Department 

Last year the cost of maintaining the Fire 
Department was $23,967.00. 

G. A. R. 

Hay Scales 

Highway Department 
Maintenance 
New construction 
It is the recommendation of the Finance Com- 
mittee that the appropriation for new street 
construction shall be the same as last year, 
namely $30,000, and that the appropriation 
for maintenance shall be $40,000 instead of 
$30,000 which was the appropriation last year. 
This increase is urged because of the cost of 
snow removal. 

Interest 17500.00 

Insurance 6000.00 

Amount carried forward $139778.50 



5000.00 



2500.00 
3600.00 
1000.00 
600.00 
2823.50 



23930.00 



100.00 
125.00 

40000.00 
30000.00 



122 



Amount brought forward 



$139778.50 



Fire $3500.00 

Workmen's Compensation 2500.00 

Library 

This is an increase of $1000 over the amount 
appropriated last year. 

Memorial Day 

Miscellaneous 

Parks and Playsteads 

Police Department 

Last year this department was maintained at a 
cost of $12,606.15 and an increased appropria- 
tion is recommended to premit the employment 
of an additional officer in Shawsheen Village. 

Printing and Stationery 

Public Dump 

Retirement of Veterans 

Retirement of Bonds 

Sewer $7000.00 

High School 6000.00 

Shawsheen Bridge 2500 . 00 

Main St. Construction 20000. 00 

Schools 

This is an increase of $8463.00 over the appro- 
priation of last year and is represented by the 
provisions for an increase in the teaching corps 
in Shawsheen Village. 

Sewer Department 

Labor and Power $3 000 . 00 

Sinking Fund 1000.00 

Soldiers' Relief 

Military Aid 

This appropriation is for the relief of veterans 
of the World War and any disbursement made 
on this account is reimbursed by the State. 

Amount carried forward 



4000.00 



550.00 

1200.00 

1200.00 

14500.00 



2000.00 

75.00 

300.00 

35500.00 



111883.00 



4000.00 



1500.00 
200.00 



$316686.50 



123 



600.00 
$10000.00 



10400.00 
15000.00 



Amount brought forward $316686.50 

Spring Grove Cemetery 5200.00 

Last year the town appropriated under this 
item, $2500 and the receipts from the sale of 
lots. These receipts average about $2600 
yearly and as they must now be returned to 
the general treasury an appropriation of 
$5200 is recommended. 

State Aid 

Street Lighting 

This appropriation is increased about $1800 
over the amount voted last year and this increase 
is due almost wholly to the added cost of light- 
ing Main Street. 

Town Officers 

Tree Warden and Moth Work 

This year the town will be required by the 
Commonwealth to spend approximately $5000 
on moth work and in addition a new 
sprayer which will cost $2250 is needed in 
this department, so that a total of $7250 is 
recommended for moth work. For tree work 
the sum of $7750 is recommended. It has been 
the practice in past years to make an appro- 
priation for both town and private tree work 
without designating the amount to be spent 
on the town's trees and on roadside cutting. 
The Finance Committee recommends that $3750 
be spent on town work and $4000 on private 
work, this latter amount to be returned to 
the Town treasury. 

Water Department $37000. 00 

Water Department, Service Pipe 2500.00 

$397386.50 



124 



The Finance Committee respectfully recommends the 
following action regarding the articles in the warrant: — 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum 
of $6000.00 to pay unpaid bills contracted by the Almshouse 
Building Committee, and to build a combination Barn and 
Garage, on petition of the Selectmen. 
(Approved. — The appropriation of $40000 made at the 
last town meeting was insufficient to complete the almshouse 
due mainly to changes and additions insisted upon by 
officials of the State. The sum required to complete the build- 
ing is $3000 and an additional sum of $3000 is asked in order 
to build a barn and a garage and to do necessary grading. 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to purchase a combination 
truck and ambulance for the use of the Police Department 
and appropriate the sum of $700 for the same, on petition of 
the Selectmen. 

(Approved — This item came before the last Town Meeting 
in the budget of the Police department.) 

Article 6. To. see if the Town will appropriate the sum of $14,- 
157.15 in addition to the balance on hand of $1140.29 to pay 
for bills due for extra work done in the reconstruction of 
Main Street, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 
(Approved — During the course of construction work on 
Main Street it was found necessary to reconstruct several 
water channels and also to make a new covering over 
Stony brook where the brook crosses Main Street, contin- 
gencies not looked for when the construction contract was 
entered into. This work accounts for the greater part of the 
amount asked for in the Article although the contract 
itself calls for some $4000 more than the town appropriated 
for the work.) 

Article 7. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of $10,- 
000.00 for granolithic sidewalks on either side of Main 
Street and do necessary grading, on petition of the Board 
of Public Works. 

(Approved ■ — It is understood by the Finance Committee 
that these walks are to replace the sidewalks ruined when 
Main Street was rebuilt last year.) 

125 



Article 8. To see if the Town will accept the provisions of an Act 
of the Legislature of 1923 "Authorizing the Town of Ando- 
ver to construct an Outfall Sewer for the Disposal of its 
Sewage." 

Also to see if the Town will vote to issue bonds or notes 
of the town in the aggregate amount of one hundred and 
fifty thousand ($150,000) dollars for the purpose of paying 
the necessary expenses and liabilities incurred under this 
act, the indebtedness under this act to be in excess of the 
statutory limit, but, except as otherwise provided therein, 
subject to Chapter Forty-Four of the General Laws, on 
petition of the Board of Public Works. 

(Approved — The Finance Committee believes that the plan 
of an outfall sewer system as described in the report of 
Weston and Sampson, the engineers employed by the 
Board of Public Works, is the best solution of this problem. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will authorize and direct the School 
Committee to petition the General Court of 1923 for autho- 
rity to borrow the sum of two hundred sixty-eight thousand 
($268,000) dollars outside the statutory limit of indebted- 
ness, by bond issue or otherwise, for the following purposes: 
To grade and loam the lot and to build and equip a new 
grammar school building, to be located on the land given by 
the American Woolen Company and accepted by the town, 
situated at the junction of and between Corbett and Mag- 
nolia Avenue, on petition of the School Committee. 
(This project was brought before the Finance Committee 
too late for an investigation that would admit of a report 
for the Town Report. The subject is, however, still under 
discussion and it is expected that the recommendation of 
the Finance Committee will be made public before the Town 
Meeting.) 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to purchase a Motor 
Ladder Truck for the Fire Department and appropriate a 
sum of $15,000 for the same on petition of William C. 
Crowley and others. 

(Approved ■ — - The Finance Committee has considered the 
purchase of this equipment for several years and now feels 

126 



that nothing can be gained by further delay in securing this 
piece of fire-fighting apparatus. The present truck is not 
only antiquated but is out of repair to the extent that it is 
dangerous to use. Ten thousand dollais is recommended 
for this purpose and this is the sum which will be asked 
by the Fire Department.) 

Article 11. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Public 
Works to extend the water main from the present termina- 
tion of same on Corbett Street at premises of» Antonio 
Catanzaro, a distance of seventeen hundred (1700) feet 
along said Corbett Street to the main entrance to the 
Sacred Heart Cemetery, and appropriate a sum of money 
sufficient therefor, on petition of Edward Topping and 
others. 
(Referred to the Board of Public Works.) 

Article 12. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of $10,000 
to lay a 6-inch water mian on Chandler Road, to the resi- 
dence of William F. Trauschke and others, on petition of 
William F. Trauschke and others. 
(Referred to the Board of Public Works.) 

Article 13. To see if the Town will accept the provisions of 
Section 85 of Chapter 32 of the General Laws of Massa- 
chusetts entitled " Pensions for Policemen and Firemen," 
on petition of Colver J. Stone and others. 
(This matter was not presented to the Finance Committee 
for consideration.) 

Article 14. To hear and act on the report of the War Memorial 
Committee. 

(This article does not require action on the part of the 
Finance Committee.) 

Article 15. To see if the Town will deed back to the Boston & 
Maine Railroad a certain piece of land situated in Ballard- 
vale, deeded to the town from the said Boston & Maine 
Railroad, September 16, 1871, on the express condition that 
neither the land nor the building thereon be used for any 
other purpose than housing fire apparatus, on petition of 
the Selectmen. 
(Approved.) 

127 



SUMMARY 

Department appropriations recommended 
Special appropriations recommended 



State Tax (estimated) $30000. 00 

County Tax (estimated) 20000 . 00 



$397386.50 
40857.00 

$438243.50 



50000.00 



$488243.50 



RESOURCES 

Cash on hand $5000. 00 

Corporation and Bank tax (est.) 30000.00 

From State for Schools 8500. 00 

Water Rates 31000.00 

Income Tax 17000.00 

Spring Grove Cemetery 2500.00 

Sundries 6000.00 



Personal 
Real Estate 



VALUATION 
1921 1922 

$2309395.00 $2616195.00 
8638965.00 9349375.00 



100000.00 
$388243.50 

1923 (est) 
$2616195.00 
10849375.00 



$10948360. 00 $11965570. 00 $13465570. 00 
Computation of tax rate for 1923 using these figures 

$388243.50 

— $28.+ 

$13465570.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY A. BODWELL, Chairman 
GEORGE ABBOT E, V. FRENCH 

GEORGE L. AVERILL C. W. HOLLAND 
GEORGE H. WINSLOW JOHN C. ANGUS, Secretary 

Finance Committee 

128 



TRUSTEES OF 
MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



E. KENDALL JENKINS ALFRED E. STEARNS 

FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL BURTON S. FLAGG 

NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 

FREDERICK A. WILSON 

President 
E. KENDALL JENKINS 

Secretary and Treasurer 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 

Librarian 
EDNA A. BROWN 

Assistants 

JULIA E. TWICHELL EDITH DONALD 

VIRGINIA L. RAMSDELL 

In Charge of Ballardvale Branch 
MARTHA D. BYINGTON 

Janitor 
ARCHIBALD MACLAREN 



129 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



FIFTIETH REPORT OF TRUSTEES 



The annual report of the trustees of Memorial Hall Library for 
1922 is herewith submitted. 

The past year has shown much of encouragement and of 
progress in the work of the library as can be seen by the interest- 
ing report of the librarian w uc i follows and which deserves 
thoughtful reading by all the citizens of Andover. 

Few towns of its size have so large a percentage of its popula- 
tion using its books, for 2615 borrowing cards are held by Andover 
people. A fact of much interest is the increasing use of non- 
fiction volumes. The majority of books borrowed are fiction as 
one would naturally expect. But our children should be en- 
couraged to read history, biography, travels and other such 
literature which will give information and stimulate thought. 

Parents and teachers can help greatly in cultivating a taste for 
such reading in the minds of the children. Our library is rich in 
such works, and a larger use of them is hoped for in the future. 

The librarian is seeking to answer calls for books on new or 
popular subjects of the time as the recent addition of volumes on 
automobiles and radio apparatus indicates. 

Several citizens in the near past have donated valuable volumes 
from their own libraries and have thus enabled the library to 
secure desirable works without expense. It is to be hoped that 
this commendable example will be followed by many others of 
our townspeople. 

Every year makes more pressing the need of larger accommo- 
dations for the library, the lack of which is seriously hindering its 
usefulness. The town should keep this in mind and plan to meet 
this need as soon as it can wisely be done. The rapid increase 
of population in Shawsheen Village makes the establishment of a 
branch library there advisable in the near future. 

130 



With our whole town the trustees mourn the death of Judge 
Charles U. Bell whose service on the board, though brief, was 
exceedingly valuable. His sound judgment, his experience in 
library direction elsewhere, his wide reading and personal interest 
in the library made his opinions of special weight in the business 
of the Board. His wise advice and genial companionship will 
long be missed in its monthly meetings. 

The library is nearing the fiftieth anniversary of its founding. 
Its date, May 30th, should be observed in some appropriate 
manner. What do our town fathers say about it? 

The Trustees, the librarian and her assistants are all eager to 
make the library as helpful as possible, and will welcome sug- 
gestions which would increase its usefulness. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. KENDALL JENKINS, Chairman 
ALFRED E. STEARNS 
NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 
BURTON S. FLAGG 
FREDERICK A. WILSON 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 



131 



TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 
In account with the Town of Andover, Mass. 



RECEIPTS 



Balance from last year $2042 . 75 

Town Appropriation 3000.00 

Dog Tax 494.60 

Income from Investments 3401 . 86 

Fines 241.71 

Gifts for Books 16.98 

Cash paid for lost books 6.55 

Sale of paper, etc. 6.80 

Matured investments 7000.00 

Total 

EXPENDITURES 

Salaries 

Lighting and Heating 

Periodicals 

Book-binding 

Books 

Insurance 

Office Expenses 

Legacy repaid 

Sundry items 

New Investments 

Cash on hand 

•Total $16211.25 



132 



$16211 


.25 


$4573 


.75 


658 


.88 


205 


.95 


234 


.35 


959 


.67 


496 


.92 


99 


.85 


100 


00 


297 


.62 


6851 


50 


1732 


76 



Classification of Income and Expenditures for the Year 1922 





INCOME 








Maint. 


Book 


Cornell Total 


Income from Investments 


$2151.61 


$893.64 


$356.61 $3401.86 


Appropriation 


3000.00 




3000.00 


Dog Tax 


494.60 




494.60 


Fines 


241.71 




241.71 


Cash paid for lost books 




6.55 


6.55 


Gifts for books 




16.98 


16.98 


Sale of paper 


6.80 




6.80 



Total 



$5894.72 $917.17 $356.61 $7168.50 



EXPENDITURES 



Salaries 


4480 


29 






93 


46 


4573 


75 


Lighting and Heating 


521 


38 






137 


50 


658 


88 


Periodicals 


205 


95 










205 


95 


Book-binding 


234 


35 










234.35 


Books 






959 


67 






959 


67 


Insurance 


496 


92 










496.92 


Office Expenses 


99 


85 










99 


85 


Sundry Items 


297 


62 










297 


62 


Total 


$6336.36 


$959.67 


$230.96 


$7526.99 


Unexpended balances 










125 


65 






Deficit 


441 


64 


42 


50 






358 


49 



Condition of Funds and Unexpended Income, Jan. 1923 



Maintenance Fund 

Book Funds 

Cornell Fund (Permanent) 

Cornell Fund (Purchase) 

Special Funds and Principal cash 


Funds 

$46600.00 

17400.00 

5000.00 

4371.32 


Income 
*$800.01 
914.55 
433.28 
830.35 
354.59 


Total 

*Deficit in Inc. in Maintenance Fund 


73371.32 


2532.77 
800.01 



Total cash on hand 



'Deficit 



$1732.76 



133 



INVESTMENTS 



Bangor & Aroostook R.R., 4s 
Boston Elevated Ry. Co. 4s 
Boston Elevated Ry. Co., 4j^s 
Chicago Railways Co., 5s 
Montreal Tramways Co., 5s 
Michigan State Tel. Co., 5s 
Boston & Maine R.R., 4s 
Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., 5s 
Southern Cal. Edison Co., 5s 
New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., 5s 
Louisville Gas & Electric Co., 5s 
The Dayton Power & Light Co., 5s 
Utah Power & Light Co., 6s 
Am. Tel. & Tel. Co., stock, 4 shares 
Savings Banks 
Principal Cash on hand 

Total 



$11000.00 


10000 


.00 


1000.00 


9962 


.50 


9962 


.50 


4981 


.25 


2000. 


00 


1000.00 


2958. 


60 


989. 


00 


915. 


00 


940. 


00 


1030. 


00 


571. 


50 


15771. 


32 


289. 


65 


$73371.32 



FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 

Treasurer 



January 31, 1923 

This certifies that I have examined and found correct the above 
statements as of January 27, 1923, whereby all securities held 
against the several funds have been examined and the income 
accruing from same accounted for. All disbursements are sup- 
ported by receipts in proper form and the cash has been verified 
and found correct. 

BURTON S. FLAGG, 

Finance Committee 



134 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 



To the Trustees of the Memorial Hall Library : 
Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit the report of the library for the twelve 
months ending December 31, 1922. 

The number of books circulated for home use during the year 
of 1922 is 46,993, which is less than for 1921, the record-breaker 
in the history of the library, but about 2700 more than for 1920. 
This fall in circulation is largely due to more prosperous industrial 
conditions and the fewer people out of work. There are, however, 
some interesting features, the most important being that the 
drop is chiefly in the use of fiction. 

While the providing of wholesome stories is a legitimate and 
proper use of public money, every library is primarily an educa- 
tional institution, a constructive force, working in cooperation 
with the schools and offering advantages to those whom the 
schools do not reach. The library has always done a large amount 
of reference work with the children, but during the past twelve 
months, there has been a marked increase in work with older 
people. The number of men using the different collections has 
steadily grown. From circulating only 30% of non-fiction, the 
monthly record now sometimes shows 40% of books of a serious 
nature taken from the library. 

Our work with the town schools, both public and parochial, 
has been extensive and encouraging. It is especially gratifying 
to note the use of the library made by the teachers. At times, 
whole classes from the parochial school arrive at the library to 
look up assigned topics. Owing to lack of room, we are unable 
to reserve many books for the use of teachers, as we should like 
to do. In our crowded quarters, any special work is always 
undertaken at the expense of something else, — in its way, 
equally important. Always a compromise has to be made; 
it is not possible to do justice to everything. 

135 



As usual, the library has tried to furnish all available help 
for the work of the local clubs. We are yet hampered by the 
difficulty of getting books which are out of print, but in this 
matter, have been able to borrow from the Boston Public Library 
and from Haverhill, volumes wanted by the different study 
departments. We are also indebted to the Phillips Academy 
Library for the loan of one rare book. It is possible to repay the 
courtesy of the school library by lending it volumes from time to 
time, but we are forced to accept without repayment in kind, the 
kindness of the two city libraries. 

Reference work is always an interesting part of our activi- 
ties and literally thousands of questions are asked on every con- 
ceivable subject. None are too trivial to receive our interested 
attention. The library, through years of service, has built up 
this reputation for helpfulness to such an extent that people no 
longer living in town write for information which they are unable 
to obtain from the libraries near them. We take especial pleasure 
in requests from Andover girls, teaching in other communities, 
who turn to their home library for advice and help. The audi- 
ences at local plays, parties, socials, even at the Christmas 
pageant just past, perhaps do not realize that behind all these 
community activities stands their town library, with its books 
suggesting games, theatricals, refreshments, costumes, recita- 
tions. Somebody planned each entertainment, and almost as 
certainly, somebody went to the library for books. 

There are several people in Andover who have given genuine 
help this year, by turning over for library use, copies of recent 
popular novels, thus releasing extra dollars for the purchase of 
books of less passing interest. For this reason, though the price 
of all books is still very high, we have been able to add an unusual 
number of valuable biographies and historical documents of 
various kinds. It is right that we should have a certain pro- 
portion of new fiction, and this passing on for others books 
one does not care to keep permanently is a service within the 
power of many people. It is a real public benefit. Not all 
the gifts have been confined to fiction ; we have received other 
valuable additions, particularly in the departments of religion 
and history. 

Among the books of special timeliness are those on radio. It 

136 



would be interesting to know how many sets in Andover have 
been constructed with the assistance of library books. Judging 
from the eagerness with which men and boys borrow these publi- 
cations, they have rendered considerable help. During the early 
part of the year, we experienced considerable difficulty in keeping 
up with the demand on this subject. The development was so 
sudden and so rapid that at first, only periodicals had sufficiently 
up-to-date information, but the publishers soon rose to the 
opportunity, and at present, the library has a really good col- 
lection of books on radio, and on that other all-vital subject, 
automobiles. They are kept on the centre table, accessible to the 
most hurried visitor. 

For the past twelve months, we have bought practically all 
fiction and juveniles in reinforced bindings. There is no doubt 
that this practice has lessened the bills for rebinding books, but it 
is not wholly satisfactory because the books, especially the 
juveniles, get so dirty. On inquiry, we find that librarians can- 
not agree about the strengthened bindings. Some think it pays; 
others think it is better to give the book a fresh cover after a 
time. In our library, the reinforced bindings seem to work well 
for adult fiction, but less acceptably for the children's books. 

In order to relieve the congestion of the children's shelves, two 
small cases, a yard high and slightly longer, have been extended 
as wings from their central bookcase. This has been done at 
the expense of space in the reading-room, and by crowding the 
tabbs on that side. It is a makeshift arrangement. The children 
of Andover ought to have the undivided attention of one person, 
in a room of their own, open at stated hours, where they 
can have more freedom than is possible under present con- 
ditions. The work of the library is already large in this line, 
and could be much developed if there were only the opportunity. 

Numerous new borrowers have registered during the year, 322 
in all. A considerable proportion come from Shawsheen Village. 
There is no doubt that a branch there would be used and appre- 
ciated. It has been suggested by the Selectmen that when the 
new schoolhouse is built, one room in the old building should 
be reserved for the use of the Memorial Hall library, the others 
to be devoted to some town purpose, as is the case with the 
building at Ballard vale. 

137 



For many years the library has granted to people leaving town 
n the summer, the privilege of taking with them books not in 
especial demand. This custom has grown steadily, until the 
summer of 1922 shows the largest vacation use yet recorded. 
It is also interesting to note that no volumes thus borrowed have 
ever fai ed to come back. 

The library has suffered a loss in the death of Judge Bell. 
Though his service as trustee was not long, his interest was 
genuine, and expressed, not only through faithful attendance at 
meetings, but by constant use of its books. It always means 
much to any librarian to have as trustees, men who really use the 
library. They are the only ones who know it under everyday 
conditions, and who can appreciate from personal experience its 
ideals, and its attempts to reach them. This factor in Judge 
Bell's service is an especial blow to the library. 

Our full yearly accomplishment is never measured by the 
number of volumes circulated. The greater part of library work 
is in terms which cannot be reduced to statistics. It lies in the 
countless inquiries, to answer which requires intimate knowledge 
of books; in the personal attention given to each individual; in 
the effort to create a pleasant, home-like atmosphere. Not long 
ago, a new-comer to Andover told us that she considered the town 
remarkable for two reasons: — because it possessed a bank which 
actually treated a stranger as a human being, and because its 
library at once received her as a friend. 

With next Memorial Day, the library will complete a half- 
century of service. There is no other town institution which 
serves young and old, rich and poor, with the same impartial 
consideration; none which enters so truly into the many-sided 
interests of the varying homes. Once established, a public 
library should become one of the most valuable assets of any 
town, — its influence limited only by the opportunity given it. 
The extraordinary growth in use and appreciation which the 
Memorial Hall Library records during its first half-century can 
be indefinitely extended and increased during the years to come. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDNA A. BROWN 

Librarian 

138 



STATISTICS OF THE LIBRARY 

Number of books issued for home use at the Memorial 

Hall 40516 

Number issued at Ballardvale 6477 

Total for the year of 1922 46993 

Number of borrower's cards actually in use 2613 

Books added by purchase 567 

Books added by gift 87 

Total accessions 654 

Books withdrawn, worn out, etc. 316 

Total number of books in the library 25763 

Volumes rebound 208 

Volumes bound, periodicals, etc. 42 

BALLARDVALE 

Number of books issued for home use 6477 

Number of cards in use 360 

Books added by purchase 42 

Books added by gift 12 

Total accessions 54 

Books now belonging to the branch 1762 



GIFTS 



Gifts of books and pamphlets are acknowledged from state 
and government departments, from other libraries, from the 
Town of Andover, the A. V. I. S. and from the following indi- 
viduals. 

Mrs. George Abbot; Judge C. U. Bell; Mrs. Walter Buck; 
Miss Emily Carter; Alexander Dick; J. C. Graham; Mrs. 
Herbert Green; Mrs. M. H. Gutterson; Rev. C. W. Henry; 
R. S. Herrick; Loring Higgins; Miss A. W. Kuhn; Mrs. Andrew 
Lawrie; Mrs. Alice Lewis; Mrs. E. W. Lloyd; Mission Study 
Group, Christ Church; Alfred Ripley; George B. Ripley; Mrs. 
J. P. Taylor. 

139 



INFORMATION FOR USERS OF THE LIBRARY 

The Memorial Hall Library is open every day except Sun- 
days and legal holidays from 9 to 12.30 in the morning, and from 
3 to 9 in the afternoon and evening. 

Any resident of Andover over ten years of age may have a 
library card upon filling out an application blank. Children in 
grades below the Punchard School are required to have their 
applications endorsed by both parent and teacher. 

All grown people are allowed to take any reasonable number 
of books, provided that only one is a seven-day book. The 
Punchard pupils are permitted to borrow two, one fiction and one 
non-fiction. 

Books are issued for fourteen days, the date upon which the 
book is due being stamped plainly on the "date due" slip at the 
time of issue. A book kept overtime incurs a fine of two cents 
for every day overdue. A few of the books most in demand are 
issued for seven days only. All these are labeled upon the book 
pocket, "Seven day book." Books lost or damaged must be 
paid for. 

Seven day books are not renewed or reserved for anyone. 
Other books may be renewed if no one else has asked for them, 
and if a work not fiction is especially desired for any serious 
purpose, notice of its return to the library will be sent on request. 

The shelves of the whole library are open to all grown people. 
The books are arranged according to subjects, and it is often 
much more satisfactory to go to the shelves and examine the 
books than to depend upon the catalogue. 

The new books are listed at intervals in the weekly paper, and 
cumulated in the yearly library report, but the only complete 
record is the card catalogue. This catalogue is arranged alpha- 
betically like a dictionary. To find whether any given book is in 
the library, look for it under the surname of the author, or under 
its title. The right-hand drawers of the case contain a second 
arrangement of cards where the books are entered according to 
the subjects of which they treat. 

The new books purchased each month are placed for some 
weeks in a special case on the north side of the reading room, so 
that the most recent additions to the library may be found 

140 



there. The library buys only a limited amount of new fiction 
but it tries to fill the wants of the community in regard to other 
books desired. People are invited to suggest for purchase the 
titles of books they wish. 

The library staff is always glad to answer questions or in any 
way to help visitors find what they want. 



LIST OF PERIODICALS AND NEWSPAPERS TAKEN FOR THE 
READING ROOM 

American monthly review of reviews 

Atlantic monthly 

Blackwood's magazine 

Bookman 

Book review digest 

Catholic world 

Century 

Country gentleman 

Christian Endeavor world^(gift) 

Country life in America 

Cumulative book index 

Etude 

Forum 

Garden magazine (gift) 

Guide to nature (gift) 

Harper's magazine 

House beautiful (gift) 

India rubber world (gift) 

International studio (gift) 

Ladies' home journal 

Library journal 

Life 

Literary digest 

Lit tell 's living age 

London weekly Times 

Missionary review of the world 

National geographic magazine 

141 



Nineteenth century 

North American review 

Open road 

Outing 

Outlook 

Popular mechanics 

Public libraries 

Readers' guide to periodical literature 

St. Nicholas 

School arts magazine 

Scientific American 

Scribner's magazine 

Survey 

Textile world (gift) 

The Woman Citizen 

Woman's home companion 

World's work 

Youth's companion 

Andover Townsman 

Boston Herald 

Boston Transcript 

Christian Science Monitor 

Lawrence Telegram 

New York Times 



142 



NEW BOOKS ADDED DURING 1922 



State and government documents are not listed. Duplicates, replacements 
and books for the Ballardvale Branch are also omitted. 

(Books marked * are gifts) 

PERIODICALS 

051 R32 American monthly review of reviews, v. 64, 65. 

051 A881 Atlantic monthly, v. 128, 129. 

052 B56 Blackwood's Edinburgh magazine, v. 209-211. 
051 B64 Bookman, v. 53-55. 

051 C33 Century, v. 102, 103. 

051 F77 Forum, v. 66, 67. 

716 G16 Garden magazine, v. 33-35. 

051 H23 Harper's magazine, v. 143, 144. 

705 H81 House beautiful, v. 49-51. 

705 161 International studio, v. 73, 74. 

020.5 L61 Library journal, v. 46. 

051 L71 Littell's living age, v. 309-313. 

910.5 N21 National geographic magazine, v. 40-41. 

052 N62 Nineteenth century, v. 89-91. 

051 N81 North American review, v. 214-215. 

051 094 Outlook, v. 128-131. 

621 P81 Popular mechanics, v. 36, 37. 

020.5 P96 Public libraries, v. 26. 

370.5 S35 School arts magazine, v. 21. 

605 S416 Scientific American, v. 125, 126. 

051 S434 Scribner's magazine, v. 70, 71. 

051 W89 World's work, v. 42, 43. 



ETHICAL AND RELIGIOUS BOOKS 

(Purchased chiefly from the Phillips Fund) 

261 Bll Babson, R. W. Future of the churches. 

174 Bll Babson, R. W. Religion and business. 

395 B15 Bailey, M. E. Value of good manners. 

268 B17b *Baker, E. D. Beginners' book in religion. 

268 B46n Betts, G. H. New programme of religious education. 

248 B64 *Borgongini-Duca, Francis. The word of God. 

274.2 C15 *Campbell, Douglas. The Puritan in Holland, England and 

America. 2v. 

268 C71s *Colson, Elizabeth. Second primary book in religion. 

143 



173 C79 

172 D78 
204 E47 
268 F86 
232 G51 
612 H14 
268 H25 
150 H27 
131 K58 
237 L14 
220.92 M43 
150 M57 
280 P23 

173 P27 
252 P31w 
150 R56 

173 S42 

174 S63 
230 S75 
268 T36 
174 T91 
230 V51 
150 W27 



Cope, H. F. The parent and the child. 

Drake, Durant. America faces the future. 

Ellwood, C. A. Reconstruction of religion. 
*Frayser, N. L. Followers of the marked trail. 

Glover, T. R. Jesus in the experience of men. 

Hall, G. S. Senescence. 

Hartley, Gertrude. Use of projects in religious 

Hazlitt, Henry. Way to will-power. 

King, Basil . Conquest of fear. 

Lake, Kirsopp. Immortality and the modern 

Mathews, Basil. Paul the dauntless. 

Myerson, Abraham. Foundations of personality. 

Parks, Leighton. Crisis of the churches. 

Patri, Angelo. Child training. 

Peabody, F. G. Sundays in college chapels since the war. 

Robinson, J. H. The mind in the making. 

Scott, M. F. Meeting your child's problems. 

Slattery, C. L. The ministry. 

Sperry, W. L. Disciplines of liberty. 
Thomas, F. L. First book in hymns and worship. 

Tweedy, H. H. Christian work as a vocation. 

Vedder, H. C. Fundamentals of Christianity. 

Wood worth, R. S. Pshchology. 



EDUCATION AND ECONOMICS 

345.12 B41 *Bell, C. U. comp. Index to penalties for crime. 

345 B63 Bolles, A. S. Putman's handy law book. 

372 B64 Bonser, F. G. Elementary school curriculum. 

353 C67 Colegrove, Kenneth. American citizens and their govern- 

ment. 

331.4 F82 Four years in the underbrush. 

304 H18 Hammond & Jenks. Great American issues. 

365 L58 *Lewis, B. G. The offender and his relations to law and so- 
ciety. 

353.9 M45 Mayo, Katherine. Mounted justice. 

331.4 P22 Parker, C. S. Working with the working woman. 

174 S64 Smith, H. L. Your biggest job; school or business. 

379.2 S85 Stewart, C. W. Moonlight schools. 

301 S86 Stoddard, Lothrop. Revolt against civilization. 

373 V28 Van Denberg, J. K. Junior high school idea. 
330 Z66 Zimand, Savel, comp. Modern social movements. 



598.2 G42 
523 H13 
590 H78m 
598.2 M42 
530 R75 
590 S42w 



BOOKS ON SCIENCE 

Gilmore, A. F. Birds of field, forest and park. 

Hale, G. E. The new heavens. 

Hornaday, W. T. Mind and manners of wild animals. 

Mathews, F. S. Field book of wild birds and their music. 

Rougier, Louis. Philosophy and the new physics. 

Scoville, Samuel. Wild folk. 



144 



591.5 S77 Squier, E. L. Wild heart. 

504 T37 Thomson, J. A. ed. Outline of science. 4v. 

599 U56 Underwood, W. L. Wild brother. 

537 W68 Willoughby, G. A. Practical electricity for beginners. 

FARM AND HOME MANAGEMENT 

638 D74 Douglass, B. W. Every step in bee-keeping. 

641 F22f Farmer, F. M. Food and cookery for the sick and con- 

valescent. 
641 G96 Gurney, L. M. Things Mother used to make. 

645 J13 Jakway, B. C. Principles of interior decoration. 

613.7 L51 Lee, G. S. Invisible exercise. 

645 N81 Northend, M. H. Art of home decoration. 

641 S86 Stockbridge, B. E. L. Practical cookbook. 

640 S91 Street er, Bertha. Home-making simplified. 

630 W93 Wright, Richardson. Truly rural. 

MECHANICAL AND USEFUL ARTS 

622 B46 Best, W. N. Burning liquid fuel. 

654 B85p Bucher, E. E. Practical wireless telegraphy. 

671 C15 Campbell, Lorn. Oxy-acetylene welding manual. 

654 C64 Cockaday, L. M. Radio-telephony for everyone. 
621.1 C87 Croft, Terrill. Steam-boilers. 

600 F74 Forbes, W. C. Romance of business. 

655 G86 Gress, E. G. American hand-book of printing. 
621.1 H62 *Hiscox, G. D. Modern steam engineering. 
654 L36 Lauer & Brown. Radio engineering principles. 
654 L56 Lescarboura, A. C. Radio for everybody. 

654 L58 Lewis, E. H. A. B. C. of vacuum tubes. 

608 M16 McFee, I. N. C. Stories of American invention. 

621.1 M55 *Merriman, Mansfield. Strength of materials. 

621 N79s *Norris & Smith. Shop arithmetic. 

654 S67 Snodgrass & Camp. Radio receiving for beginners. 

654 V61h Verrill, A. H. The home radio. 

654 W17 Walter, L. H. Directive wireless telegraphy. 

654 Y27 Yates & Pacent. Complete radio book. 

FINE ARTS 

715 A64 Apgar, A. C. Ornamental shrubs of the United States. 
791 B63 Bollman, G. & H. Motion pictures for community needs. 
745 D42f *Dennison Mfg. Co. How to make crepe paper flowers. 
745 D42c *Dennison Mfg. Co. How to make paper costumes. 

745 D42s *Dennison Mfg. Co. Sealing wax art. 

745 D42p *Dennison Mgf. Co. Weaving with paper rope. 

745 El 2 Earle, Olive Lampshades. 

793 G27i Geister, Edna. Ice-breakers and the ice-breaker herself. 

793 G27t Geister, Edna. It is to laugh 

716 K581 King, L. Y. The little garden. 

728 094 Outwater, J. G. Designs for American homes. 

145 



LITERATURE, ESSAYS, AND POETRY 

843 B66 *Boulenger, Marcel. Marguerite. 

820.9 B79n Brooke, S. A. English literature from the beginning. 

822.08 C66 Cohen, H. L. comp. One-act plays by modern authors. 

824 E13s Eastman, Max. The sense of humor. 

824 F16 *Fairless, Michael. The roadmender. 

822.08 F95 Fuess & Stearns, comp. Little book of society verse. 
808 H71 Holliday & Van Rensselaer. Business of writing. 
843 J21 *Jaloux, Edmond. La fin d'un beau jour. 

843 L131 *Lafage, Leon. Les abeilles mortes. 

827 L46d Leacock, Stephen. My discovery of England. 

808 L55 Leonard & Fuess. Good writing. 

793 L88 Lord, Katherine. Plays for school and camp. 

824 M16 McFee, William. An ocean tramp. 

810.9 M31 Manly & Rickert. Contemporary American literature. 
820.9 M31 Manly & Rickert. Contemporary British literature. 

821 M37 Masefield, John. Poems and plays. 

822 M63 Milne, A. A. Three plays. 

824 N48a Newton, A. E. Amenities of book collecting. 

824 096 *Overton, Grant. When winter comes to Main Street. 

808 R34 Rhodes, C. E. Effective expression. 

824 R51f *Ritchie, A. I. T. From friend to friend. 

821 R56 Robinson, E. A. Collected poems. 

808.3 S63 Slosson & Downey. Plots and personalities. 

827 S84 Stewart, D. O. Parody outline of history. 

824 W2441 Warner, F. L. & G. Life's minor collisions. 

822 W64 Wilde, Percival. Eight comedies for little theatres. 



DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL 

918.8 B39e Beebe, William. Edge of the jungle. 

918.5 E51 Bingham, Hiram. Inca land. 

917.1 D28 Davidson, L. L. A winter of content. 

917.9 D64 Dixon, W. H. Westward hoboes. 
917.8 E14 Eaton, W. P. Skyline camps. 

916.6 F74 Forbes, Rosita. Secret of the Sahara. 

917.8 H12 Hagedorn, Hermann. Roosevelt in the Bad Lands. 

914.7 H24 Harrison, Marguerite. Marooned in Moscow. 

917.8 H31 Haworth, P. L. Trail-makers of the northwest. 

914.2 H76 Hopkins, R. T. Thomas Hardy's Dorset. 
917.446 L43 Lawrence, R. M. Old Park Street and its vicinity. 

917.1 L86 Longstreth, T. M. The Laurentians. 

914.2 M43 Matz, B. W. Inns and taverns of "Pickwick." 

914.41 M64 Miltoun, Francis. Rambles in Brittany. 

914.42 M64 Miltoun, Francis. Rambles in Normandy. 
910.4 N97 Nutting, W. W. Track of the "Typhoon." 

915.6 R44 Rihbany, A. M. Wise men from the east and the west. 

917.8 R65 Rollins, P. A. The cowboy. 

919.1 R91 *Russell, C. E. Outlook for the Philippines. 

915.69 S63 *Slattery, Margaret. New paths through old Palestine. 

146 



910 S65 Smith, Sir Ross. 14,000 miles through the air. 

917.3 S89 Stearns, H. F. ed. Civilization in the United States. 

917.98 S93w *Stuck, Hudson. Winter circuit of our Arctic coast. 

918.1 T59 Tomlinson, H. M. The sea and the jungle. 

917.95 W65 Wilkinson, Marguerite. Dingbat of Arcady. 

BIOGRAPHY 

920 A13 Abbott, Lyman. Silhouettes of my contemporaries. 

92 A875 *Atkinson, Wilmer. Autobiography. 

92 B252 *Barnabee, H. C. Reminiscences. 

92 B286b Barton, W. E. Life of Clara Barton. 2v. 

92 M355m Beveridge, A. J. Life of John Marshall. 4v. 

92 CI 67 Cantacuzene, Princess. My life here and there. 

92 D293 Davis, J. J. The iron puddler. 

92 D441 Depew, C. M. My memories of eighty years. 

928 E47 Ellsworth, W. W. Golden age of authors. 

92 F753 Ford, J. L. Forty odd years in the literary shop. 

922 PI 6 Gentleman with a duster. Painted windows. 

92 P146 Hendrick, B. J. Life and letters of W. H. Page. 2v. 

92 F561 Howe, M. A. DeW. Memories of a hostess. 

92 L241 Lane, A. W. ed. Letters of Franklin K. Lane. 

92 L861 Longfellow, E. W. Random memories. 

92 W211 *Martyn, Charles. Life of Artemus Ward. 

92 M381 Mason, Arthur. Ocean echoes. 
92 M823 Morgenthau, Henry. All in a life-time. 

92 H536 Perry, Bliss. Life and letters of Henry Higginson. 

92 S152 *Saint-Saens, Camille. Musical memories. 

92 B795 *Sharp, J. C. John Cotton Brooks. 
92 S715 Soskice, Mrs. J. M. H. Chapters from childhood. 

92 D399 Stirling, A. M. W. William DeMorgan and his wife. 

92 W274t Thayer, W. R. George Washington. 

92 B657 Tinker, C. B. Young Boswell. 

922 W15g Walker, Williston. Great men of the Christian church. 

92 S392w Wasielwski, J. W. von. Life of Robert Schumann. 

92 W319 *Watterson, Henry. "Marse Henry", an autobiography. 
2v. 

HISTORY 
974.2 B48 Bigelow, E. V. Brief history of the Isles of Shoals. 

972 D58 *Dillon, E. J. Mexico on the verge. 

940.91 D85 *Duane, J. T. Dear old K; Company K, 101st infantry. 

991.4 H24 *Harrison, F. B. Corner-stone of Philippine independence. 

949.7 M87 *Mowrer, P. S. Balkanized Europe. 

940.91 R561 *Robinson, W. H. Forging the sword. 

947 S73g *Spargo, John. Greatest failure in all history. 

947 S73r *Spargo, John. Russia as an American problem. 



Adams, S. H. 
Adams, S. H. 
Andrews, M. R. S. 



FICTION 

Success. 

The unspeakable Perk. 

His soul goes marching on. 



147 



Ashmun, Margaret. 
Atherton, Gertrude. 
Bacheller, Irving. 
Bailey, H. C. 
Bailey, Temple. 
Baldwin, Faith. 
Barnett, Ada. 
Bassett, S. W. 
Beck, L. A. 
Benet, W. R. 
Bennett, Arnold. 
Benson, E. F. 
Bindloss, Harold. 
Blackwood & Wilson. 
Bone, D. W. 
Bottome, Phyllis. 
Bridges, Victor. 
Bryant, Marguerite. 
Buckrose, Mrs. J. E. 
Buckrose, Mrs. J. E. 
Burnett, Mrs. F. H. 
Burnett, Mrs. F. H. 
Burnham, C. L. 
Byrne, Donn. 
Caine, Hall. 
Cameron, Margaret. 
Cooper, F. L. 
Cooper, H. St. J. 
Cur wood, J. O. 
Daviess, M. T. 
Deland, Margaret. 
De la Mare, Walter. 
De la Mare, Walter. 
De la Pasture, E. E. M. 
De Morgan, William. 
Diver, Maud. 
Doubleday, Roman. 
Dowdall, Mrs. M. F. H 
Durand, Ralph. 
Evarts, H. G. 
Farnol, Jeffery. 
Fisher, D. C. 
Fletcher, J. S. 
Fletcher, J. S. 
Fletcher, J. S. 
Fletcher, J. S. 
Fletcher, J. S. 
Footner, Hulbert. 
French, J. L. ed. 
Galsworthy, John. 
Galsworthy, John. 



Topless towers. 
*Sisters-in-law. 

In the days of poor Richard. 

Call Mr. Fortune. 

The gay cockade. 
*Mavis of Green Hill. 

Man on the other side. 

Granite and clay. 

The ninth vibration, etc. 

The first person singular. 

Mr. Prohack. 

Lovers and friends. 

Man from the wilds. 

Wolves of God, etc. 

The brassbounder. 

The kingfisher. 

Greensea island. 

Richard. 

House with the golden windows. 

The privet hedge. 
*Head of the House of Coombe. 
♦Robin. 

The key note. 

Messer Marco Polo. 
♦Master of man. 

Golden rule Dollivers. 

Captain Pott's minister. 

Garden of memories. 

Honor of the big snows. 

The golden bird. 

The vehement flame. 

Memoirs of a midget. 

The return. 

Humbug. 

Old man's youth. 

Far to seek. 

Hemlock Avenue mystery. 

Three loving ladies. 

The mind healer. 

Settling of the sage. 

Martin Connigsby's vengeance. 

Rough-hewn. 

The borough treasurer. 

Dead men's money. 

Herapath property. 

Middle Temple murder. 

Orange yellow diamond. 

Woman from outside. 

Great sea stories. 

In chancery. 

To let. 



148 



Gaul, Avery. 
Gerould, K. F. 
Gibbs, George. 
Gordon, C. W. 
Grey, Zane. 
Harker, L. A. 
Harrison, H. S. 
Hemon, Louis. 
Hepburn, E. N. 
Hext, Harrington. 
Holland, B. T. 
Holt, Isabella. 
Hough, Emerson. 
Hudson, J. W. 
Hutchinson, A. S. M. 
Hutchinson, A. S. M. 
Ingram, E. M. 
Johnson, Owen. 
Johnston, Sir Harry 
Jordan, Elizabeth. 
Jordan, Kate 
Kaye-Smith, Sheila. 
Kelley, E. M. 
King, Basil. 
Lagerlof, Selma. 
Laing, Janet. 
Lee, Jeannette. 

Lewis, Sinclair. 

Lincoln, J. S. 

Lindsay, William. 

Locke, W. J. 

Lutz, G. L. H. 

Lutz, G. L. H. 

Lynde, Francis. 

Lynde, Francis. 

Macaulay, Rose. 

Mackenzie, Compton. 

Marshall, Archibald. 

Marshall, Edison. 

Marshall, Edison. 

Marshall, Edison. 

Milne, A. A. 

Milne, A. A. 

Mitchell, R. C. 

Mitchell, R. C. 

Mundy, Talbot. 

Norris, Kathleen. 

Oemler, M. C. 

Oldmeadow, Ernest. 

Olmstead, Florence. 

Onions, Oliver. 



Five nights at the Five Pines. 
Lost valley. 

House of Mohun. 

To him that hath. 

To the last man. 

The bridge across. 

Saint Teresa. 

Maria Chapdelaine. 

Wings of time. 

Number 87. 

A vagrant tune. 

The Marriotts and the Powells. 

The covered wagon. 

Abbe Pierre. 
The clean heart. 
This freedom. 

Thing from the lake. 

Skippy Bedelle. 

Man who did the right thing. 

The blue circle. 

Trouble-the-house. 
*Johanna Godwin. 

Turn-about Eleanor. 

Thread of flame. 

The outcast. 

Wintergreen. 

Uncle Bijah's ghost. 

Babbitt. 

Fair harbor. 

The backsliders. 

Tale of Triona. 

City of fire. 

Voice in the wilderness. 

Fire-bringers. 

Pirates' hope. 

Dangerous ages. 

The altar steps. 

Big Peter. 
*Shepherds of the wilds. 

Sky-line of spruce. 

Snowshoe trail. 

Mr. Pirn. 

Red house mystery. 

Jane journeys on. 

Play the game. 

Winds of the world. 
*Certain people of importance. 

Two shall be born. 

Coggin. 

This little world. 

Tower of oblivion. 



149 



Onions, Mrs. Oliver. 
Onions, Mrs. Oliver. 
Onions, Mrs. Oliver. 
Oppenheim, E. P. 
Oppenheim, E. P. 
Oppenheim, E. P. 
Phillpotts, Eden. 
Pickthall, M. L. C. 
Poole, Ernest. 
Pryde, Anthony. 
Pryde & Weekes. 
Putnam, N. W. 
Quick, Herbert. 
Rhodes, E. M. 
Richmond, Grace. 
Rinehart, M. R. 
Robinson, E. M. 
Sabatini, Rafael. 
Sabatini, Rafael. 
Sampson, E. S. 
Sedgwick, A. D. 
Singmaster, Elsie. 
Snaith, J. C. 
Sterrett, F. R. 
Tarkington, Booth. 
Taylor, K. H. 
Taylor, K. H. 
Terhune, Anice. 
Turner, J. H. 
Wallace, Edgar. 
Walpole, Hugh. 
Watts, M. S. 
Weir, F. R. 
Wells, Carolyn. 
Wharton, Edith. 
Widdemer, Margaret. 
Wilson, H. L. 
Willsie, Honore. 
Wodehouse, P. G. 



The arrant rover. 
Three of hearts. 
Wrong Mr. Right. 
The devil's paw. 
The evil shepherd. 
Great Prince Shan. 
The grey room. 
The bridge. 
Beggars' gold. 
*Ordeal of honor. 
The purple pearl. 
West Broadway. 
Vandemark's folly. 
Copper streak trail. 
Four-square. 
The breaking point. 
Enter Jerry. 
Captain Blood. 
Scaramouche. 
The shorn lamb. 
*Adrienne Toner. 
*Bennett Malin. 
The Van Roon. 
These young rebels. 
Gentle Julia. 

Modern trio in an old town. 
Real stuff. 
*Eyes of the village. 
Where your treasure is- 
Jack o' judgment. 
The cathedral. 
House of Rimmon. 
Colinette of Redmoon. 
Man who fell through the earth. 
Glimpses of the moon. 
Year of Delight. 
Merton of the movies. 
Judith of the godless valley. 
Indiscretions of Archie. 



CHILDREN'S BOOKS— NON-FICTION 

92 B634d Bok, Edward. A Dutch boy fifty years afterwards. 

395 B72 Braddy, Nella. Young folks' cyclopedia of etiquette. 

398.4 G41 Gilbert, Henry. Robin Hood. 

914.8 H14 Hall, J. O. When I was a boy in Norway. 
937 L21 Lamprey, Louise. Children of ancient Rome. 
398.4 043 Olcott, H. M. The whirling king, etc. 

914.94 P27 Patteson, S. L. When I was a girl in Switzerland. 

051 S147 St. Nicholas, v. 48, pt. 2, v. 49, pt. 1. 

808.9 S64mo Smith, E. S. comp. More mystery tales for boys and girls. 



150 



790 S67 Snow & Froelich. A hundred things a girl can make. 

901 V32s Van Loon, Hendrick. Story of mankind. 

920 T16p Tappan, E. M. Heroes of progress. 

92 L633tb Tarbell, I. M. Boy scouts' life of Lincoln. 

92 B646w White, S. E. Daniel Boone. 



Aldon, Adair. 
Ashmun, Margaret. 
Baker, Olaf. 
Barbour, R. H. 
Barbour, R. H. 
Blanchard, L. M. 
Brill, E. C. 
Brown, E. A. 
Browne, Belmore. 
Canfield, F. C. 
Dix^B. M. 
Duganne, Phyllis. 
Dyer, R. O. 
Eaton, W. P. 
Fairstar, Mrs. 
Hartley, G. I. 
Hough, Emerson. 
Hudson, W. H. 
Lindsay, Maud. 
Lofting, Hugh. 
Perkins, L. F. 
Phillips, E. C. 
Pier, A. S. 
Pollock, F. L. 
Price, E. B. 
Schultz, J. W. 
Schultz, J. W. 
Spyri, Johanna. 
Turpin, Edna. 
Wheeler, F. Rolt- 
Wheeler, F. Rolt- 
White, E. O. 



STORIES FOR CHILDREN 

Hill of adventure. 

Including Mother. 

Dusty Star. 

Metipom's hostage. 

The Turner twins. 

Chico. 

When lighthouses are dark. 

The Chinese kitten. 

The frozen barrier. 

The big tent. 

The turned-about girls. 

Ruthie. 

Little people of the garden. 

Boy scouts at Crater Lake. 

Memoirs of a London doll. 

Boy hunters in Demerara. 

Young Alaskans on the Missouri. 

A little boy lost. 

Little Missey. 

Voyages of Doctor Dolittle. 

The Swiss twins. 

The Christmas light. 

David Ives. 

The woods rider. 

Fortune of the Indies. 

Trail of the Spanish horse. 

The war-trail fort. 

Mazli. 

The old mine's secret. 

Boy with the U. S. miners. 

The wreck-hunters. 

Peggy in her blue frock. 



151 



REPORT OF CUSTODIAN 
JOHN CORNELL ART GALLERY 



To the Trustees of the Memorial Hall Library. 

Gentlemen: I herewith submit the report of the gallery for 
the twelve months ending December 31, 1922. 

The closing of 1922 finds the gallery with a record of 212 
visitors, the number being nearly equally divided between 
adults and children, the former registering 100, and the latter 
112. 

It is interesting to note that this record is almost the same 
as that of 1918, the record then being 211. There were excellent 
reasons at that time for the small attendance which do not hold 
now. 

Thirteen pictures, representative of the different schools of 
bainting, have been loaned, for the winter, to the Punchard 
Free School to occupy wall spaces pleading eloquently for 
decoration. This admirable idea was conceived and executed by 
M\rs. F. P. McClellan, head of the Art Department of the Novem- 
ber Club, ably assisted by Mrs. G. M. R. Holmes. The pictures 
were hung the week before Christmas. Their return to the 
gallery in the spring will emphasize anew the fact that the equip- 
ment of our new High School is not complete. Here is a clear 
field for graduating classes. It is certain that this bringing of a 
portion of the gallery to the pupils will result in an increased 
interest in the gallery as a whole. A recent caller, resident for 
many years in Washington and well acquainted with many of the 
art treasures in our Capital, expressed much satisfaction and 
pleasure in the Cornell collection. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ABBIE S. DAVIS 

Custodian 
152 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



TWENTY- SECOND ANNUAL 
REPORT 



OF THE 



Board of Public Works 



EMBRACING THE THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF 
WATER COMMISSIONERS AND TWENTY- 
FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF 
SEWER COMMISSIONERS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1922 



ANDOVER, MASS. 

THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1923 



*JOHN H. FLINT 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

1889—1899 

*JAMES P. BUTTERFIELD 
♦FELIX G. HAYNES 

SEWER COMMISSIONERS 



1893—1894 

*WM. S. JENKINS 
*JOHN L. SMITH 
CHARLES E. ABBOTT 



1899 



BOARD OF 

1902 



*JOHN H. FLINT 
*WM. S. JENKINS 
♦JOHN L. SMITH 
♦JAMES P. BUTTERFIELD 
♦FELIX G. HAYNES 

1906—1907 

♦FELIX G. HAYNES 
♦JOHN W. BELL, Treas. 
JAMES C. SAWYER, Sec'y 
♦LEWIS T. HARDY 
♦HARRY M. EAMES 

1908—1912 

♦LEWIS T. HARDY 
♦JOHN W. BELL, Treas. 
JAMES C. SAWYER, Sec'y 
ANDREW McTERNEN 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS 

1914—1916 

THOS. E. RHODES ('19) 
BARNETT ROGERS ('16) 
♦LEWIS T. HARDY ('16) 
ANDREW McTERNEN, Sec'y ('18) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas. ('18) 

1917—1918 

BARNETT ROGERS ('19) 
THOS. E. RHODES ('20) 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('18) 
CHAS. B. BALDWIN, Sec'y ('19) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas. ('18) 

1919-1920-1921 

ARNETT ROGERS ('22) 
WILLIAM D. McINTYRE ('21) 
ARTHUR T. BOUTWELL ('22) 
PHILIP L. HARDY Sec'y ('21) 
THOS. E. RHODES, Treas. ('23) 



1894—1899 

♦WM. S. JENKINS 
♦JOHN L. SMITH 
♦JOHN E. SMITH 

PUBLIC WORKS 

1903—1906 

♦JOHN L. SMITH 
♦FELIX G. HAYNES 
♦JOHN W. BELL 
♦LEWIS T. HARDY 
JAMES C. SAWYER 

1907—1908 

♦FELIX G. HAYNES 
♦JOHN W. BELL, Treas. 
JAMES C. SAWYER, Sec'y 
♦LEWIS T. HARDY 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

1913—1914 

♦LEWIS T. HARDY ('16) 
BARNETT ROGERS ('16) 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('15) 
THOS. E. RHODES, Sec'y ('14) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas.(15) 



1916—1917 

BARNETT ROGERS ('19) 
THOS. E. RHODES ('17) 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('18) 
CHAS. B. BALDWIN, Sec'y ('19) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS,Treas.('18) 

1918—1919 

BARNETT ROGERS ('22) 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('21) 
PHILIP L. HARDY ('21) 
CHAS. B. BALDWIN, Sec'y ('22) 
THOS. E. RHODES, Treas. ('20) 

1922 

THOMAS E. RHODES ('23) 
PHILIP L. HARDY ('24) 
WM. D. McINTYRE, Treas. ('24) 
ARTHUR T. BOUTWELL ('25) 
EDWARD SHATTUCK ('25) 



SUPERINTENDENT 

FRANK L. COLE 



* Deceased. 



REPORT OF 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



To the Citizens of the Town of Andover, Mass.: 

Your Board of Public Works herewith submits its annual 
report for the year ending December 31, 1922. 

This is the tenth annual report of the Board under its reorganiz- 
ation and includes the twenty-sixth annual report of the sewer 
system, the thirty-fourth of the water system and the tenth of the 
Highway and Park Departments, since they have been under the 
jurisdiction of the Board of Public Works. 

Organization 

Mr. Arthur Boutwell was re-elected to the Board for the term 
of three years and Mr. Edward Shattuck was elected for the same 
period. 

The Board met on March 13, 1922, and organized as follows: 

Chairman, T. E. Rhodes. 

Secretary, Philip L. Hardy. 

Treasurer, William Mclntyre. 

Mr. Frank L. Cole was appointed as Superintendent for one 
year and George Dick as his assistant. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

During the past year there were two extensions made to the 
water main, one on Tewksbury Street, Ballardvale, Mass., and 
one on Carmel Road, besides additions made in Shawsheen 
Village, the cost of which was borne by the American Woolen 
Company. 

The 6-inch main on Lowell and Haverhill Streets was replaced 
by a 10-inch main; the cost of this work was paid for from receipts 
of the water bonds which were issued in 1922. There is still 
approximately two thousand (2000) feet of this main to lay. The 

3 



cost of these various jobs together with the exact amount of pipe 
laid will be found in the Superintendent's report. 

In connection with the new construction on Main Street all 
the old water service pipes were renewed and the old style 
hydrants replaced. There were two new hydrants added in West 
Andover near valuable property of the American Woolen Com- 
pany. 

The detailed account of the expenditures for this department 
will be found in the Superintendent's report. The greater part 
of the appropriation and receipts from water rates was used in 
regular maintenance expense. 

During the coming year we expect to install a new pumping 
unit at the Haggetts Pond station, the cost of which will be 
carried by money received from the sale of bonds remaining from 
the forty thousand ($40,000.00) dollars issued last year. 

We feel that the Water Department is in very good shape. A 
very large percentage of our services are metered and we expect 
this spring to install a measuring device on the main coming from 
the Haggetts Pond station, by means of which we may be able to 
check up the efficiency of the pumps, as well as the presence of 
any large leaks in our mains. 

The Board would recommend the sum of ($2500.00) twenty five 
hundred dollars and receipts for service pipe and the sum of 
thirty-seven thousand ($37,000.00) dollars for maintenance for 
the ensuing year. 

A detailed account of the estimated expenditures in the 
maintenance of the Water Department will be found in the 
Superintendent's report. 

• The Water Bonded Debt 

The bonded debt of the water system on January 1, 1922, was 
one hundred and seven thousand dollars ($107,000.00). During 
the year 1922 there was a Forty thousand dollar ($40,000.00) 
issue of bonds floated to be used in making additions and 
changes in this department, which added to the existing bonded 
debt makes the total bonded debt of this system January 1, 1923, 
one hundred and thirty-one thousand dollars, ($131,000.00). 

4 



Of this indebtedness $30,000.00 is redeemable by the sinking 
fund which on January 1, 1923, amounted to $27,410.00. 

The sum of $750.00 should be appropriated for the sinking fund 
for the year 1923. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

There has been very little work done in the construction of new 
sewers during the past year with the exception of sewers laid and 
paid for by the American Woolen Company. The sewer on 
Lowell Street which was started late in 1921 and upon which the 
work was stopped on account of weather conditions, was finished 
in the spring of 1922. 

As we were directed by a vote of the town at the last March 
meeting, we have had the question of sewage disposal of the 
Town investigated by expert engineers. The firm of Weston & 
Sampson of Boston Mass., was employed to do this work and we 
are giving below an extract from their report. 

Report of Weston & Sampson 

On July 26, 1922, your Honorable Board instructed us to 
make a study of methods for disposing of the sewage of the Town 
of Andover, and to give our opinion regarding the most feasible 
method for doing this work. We have completed our study, and 
present the following report: — 

Present Conditions 

It is unnecessary to state that the present conditions at the 
sewage disposal works, apart from those resulting from the 
development of Shawsheen Village, call for relief. The present 
works treat only the portion of the sewage of the Town discharged 
through the high-level sewer and produce a low-grade effluent as 
the accompanying results of analysis of a sample collected on 
September 23, as well as those made by the Department of 
Health, indicate. The remaining sewage flows to the pumping 
station at Shawsheen Village, and instead of being pumped 
through the force-main to the disposal works as was planned, is 
discharged directly into the river without treatment. 



We are informed that the American Woolen Company proposes 
to establish not only large mills and a mill village, but the offices 
and residences of its executives. The part of the village already 
constructed is good evidence of the serious purpose of the company. 

It is the duty of the Town to care for the sewage from this 
village, and the American Woolen Company has offered to con- 
tribute to the cost of a sewer to the Merrimack River provided 
the waste from the Shawsheen Mills be taken care of with the 
sewage from the whole town. Therefore, not only the disposal 
of the domestic sewage, but of the industrial waste, must be 
considered. 

Estimated Population and Volume of Sewage 

In making our estimates of population and quantity of sewage, 
we have taken into consideration the plans of the American 
Woolen Company and the probable development of Shawsheen 
Village. Should the development of this village be as its pro- 
jectors plan, the Town of Andover, which has grown slowly in 
the past, may be expected to grow rapidly in the future. Our 
estimates of population and volumes of sewage are given in the 
following table and are illustrated by the following diagram: 



TABLE 1 — ESTIMATED POPULATION AND VOLUME OF SEWAGE 





Population 


Volumes of Sewage 


Year 


Gallons per capita 


Gallons per 






per Day 


Day 


1922 


8,490 


83.9 


711,000 


1923 


9,010 


84.2 


759,000 


1924 


9,590 


84.8 


815,000 


1925 


10,100 


85.1 


867,000 


1926 


10,600 


85.7 


908,000 


1927 


11,190 


86.1 


963,000 


1928 


11,700 


86.6 


1,012,000 


1929 


12,130 


87.1 


1,057,000 


1930 


12,720 


87.7 


1,115,000 


1931 


13,270 


88.2 


1,170,000 


1932 


13,800 


88.9 


1,226,000 


1933 


14,300 


89.4 


1,278,000 


1934 


14,850 


89.9 


1,334,000 


1935 


15,350 


90.4 


1,387,000 


1936 


15,900 


90.9 


1,445,000 


1937 


16,360 


91.4 


1,495,000 


1938 


16,950 


92.0 • 


1,560,000 


1939 


17,400 


92.4 


1,609,000 


1940 


18,000 


92.9 


1,671,000 


1941 


18,450 


93.4 


1,722,000 


1942 


19,000 


93.9 


1,783,000 


1943 


19,550 


94.4 


1,845,000 


1944 


20,100 


94.9 


1,906,000 


1945 


20,600 


95.4 


1,965,000 


1946 


21,100 


96.0 


2,025,000 


1947 


21,600 


96.3 


2,080,000 


1948 


22,100 


97.0 


2,142,000 


1949 


22,600 


97.4 


2,200,000 


1950 


23,100 


98.0 


2,265,000 



Sewage Disposal Schemes 

We have made studies of several schemes of sewage disposal 
which we have named as follows: 



Scheme Brief Description 

A ImhofT Tank, Trickling Filters and Appurtenances, 
located about 600 feet north of the present settling tank; 
first cost $110,000.00. 



Scheme Brief Description 

B Same as Scheme A, but located one half mile up the 
brook from the Shawsheen Village swimming pool, and 
requiring a force-main from the present pumping station 
and a sewer from the works to the Shawsheen River. 
First cost $155,000.00. 

C Like Scheme A, but located on the triangular area north 
of the Shawsheen River in both Andover and Lawrence. 
First cost $122,500.00. 

D Imhoff Tank to treat the total sewage, the treated sewage 
to be discharged on present sand beds, supplemented by a 
trickling filter and appurtenances. First cost $80,000,00. 

E Discharged into Merrimack River through an outfall 
sewer from the present pumping station at Shawsheen 
Village, as suggested by John Franklin, C. E., supple- 
mented after five years by treatment before discharge 
into the river in Imhoff tanks located as in Scheme C. 
First cost $150,000.00; additional cost of tanks and beds, 
$50,000.00. 

F Imhoff Tank with sludge beds located as in Scheme C, and 
discharging into Shawsheen River with sewer from tank 
to the Merrimack, to be built when volume equals 1 Mdg. 
First cost $50,000.00. Additional cost $135,000.00. 

G Same as Scheme E, without provision for tank treat- 
ment. First cost $150,000.00. 

Industrial Waste 

We are informed by Mr. John Franklin, Engineer of Shaw- 
sheen Village, that the proposed Shawsheen Mills will discharge 
a maximum of 2,000,000 gallons of industrial waste daily. As 
most of this volume would be discharged within the ordinary 
working day of ten hours, a sewer capacity averaging 4,800,000 
gallons in 24 hours would be required. However, as the discharge 
of waste maybe at the rate of 4,000 gallons per minute or 5,760,- 
000 gallons per day, a sewer capacity equivalent to this higher 
volume should be provided. A sewer for carrying the combined 
industrial waste and domestic sewage should have a capacity of 
from 8,500,000 to 9,000,000 gallons in twenty-four hours. This 

8 



is equivalent to a diameter of 24 inches. For the domestic 
sewage alone, a 16-inch sewer would suffice. The 16-inch sewer 
would cost $150,000.00 and the 24-inch sewer $230,000.00. 
Therefore the additional cost of sewer construction to care for 
industrial waste would be $80,000.00. 

It would be possible to use ImhofT Tanks and trickling filters 
and dispose of the industrial waste with the domestic sewage 
either on the present site or nearby, — Schemes A, B, C and D, — 
but because industrial waste would be more difficult to purify 
than domestic sewage, the cost of construction per million 
gallons of capacity, daily, would be increased 25% and the cost 
of operation by at least as much. This is because larger tank 
space and filter bed area and more labor are required for the more 
concentrated industrial waste. 

Choice of Scheme 

It is obvious that if the volume of sewage could be predicted 
with accuracy, the method of sewage disposal could be chosen 
readily. Consequently much depends upon the growth of 
Shawsheen Village, and good judgment must be used in this 
regard. 

Without Shawsheen Village, Andover might be expected to 
grow but slowly for the next few years, afterwards more rapidly 
with the extension of the zone of suburban residence to the north 
of Boston. On the other hand, if we accept the predictions of 
some of the representatives of the American Woolen Company, 
the population may increase by 10,000 in less than ten years. 
Our estimates of population and of concomitant volumes of 
sewage represent our best judgment, based on existing evidence. 

From the standpoint of cost, it would be cheapest for the 
Town to dispose of its sewage by passing it through settling 
tanks directly into the Shawsheen (Scheme F), until the volume 
of sewage should reach one million gallons a day, and afterwards 
to discharge it through an outfall sewer into the Merrimack 
River. This plan should be followed if it were believed that 
Shawsheen Village might not develop enough to warrant the 
expense of going to the Merrimack. But the development of 
Shawsheen Village would have to fall far short of the expecta- 
tions of its promo tors before it would be less economical to 



construct an outfall sewer at once and give up the existing dis- 
posal works. 

In order to carry out Scheme F, it would be necessary to take 
from the American Woolen Company land on the north side of 
the river which they have planned for other uses. Therefore it 
could not be carried out without the Company's approval. 
Furthermore, the alternate schemes, D, C, and E, which involve 
the disposal of the sewage on the present site or near it, also 
might interfere with the plans for Shawsheen Village because of 
the inevitable local nuisance of the works or the need for the land 
itself for development. 

Therefore in view of all the facts, your engineers recommend 
the disposal of the sewage by discharge though an outfall sewer 
into the Merrimack River, Scheme G. For domestic sewage 
alone, including that from Shawsheen Village, a sewer 16 inches in 
diameter would be required. This size might be increased to care 
for manufacturing waste. Should purification by subsidence in 
tanks be required in the future, this could be effected, Scheme E, 
at an additional cost of about $50,000.00. 

Pollution of the River at Shawsheen Village 

On January 6, as requested by your Honorable Board, we re- 
ported on the sanitary condition of the Shawsheen River. This 
report was the result of an intensive study of the river from 
Ballardvale to Shawsheen Village and included an investigation 
of the industrial plants at Ballardvale and below. 

The results of our investigation show the Shawsheen River to 
be moderately polluted with sewage and with industrial wastes. 
No nuisance exists at the present time, but the appearance of the 
stream and its suitability for fine manufacturing would be 
bettered if a portion of the waste from each of the three lower 
plants could be diverted into the proposed trunk sewer, that from 
the Smith and Dove Manufacturing Company's mill and from 
the Tyer Rubber Company's factory through the Main Street 
sewer into the town system, and that from the Marland Mills 
through a private sewer connected with the Shawsheen Mill and 
thence pumped into the outfall sewer. 

Conditions at Ballardvale are reasonably satisfactory at the 
present time. The time may come, however, when it shall be 

10 



advisable to dispose of the textile waste from the Ballardvale 
Mills by the usual* tanks and beds, and the dye-factory waste 
from the Beaver Manufacturing Company by treatment with 
lime, followed by subsidence. 

Because the conditions of Shawsheen River demand no special 
consideration at this time on the part of the Town, and because 
the mill owners probably possess proscriptive rights to dis- 
charge their wastes into the stream, the Town might well leave 
the question of the reception of a portion of the wastes from the 
Marland Mills into the outfall sewer with the waste from the 
Shawsheen Mills, to the two corporations immediately concerned. 

The building of the outfall sewer would improve materially the 
character of the Shawsheen River below the existing disposal 
works. 

Recommendations 

As a result of their study, your engineers recommend that the 
Town of Andover construct an outfall sewer from Shawsheen 
Village to the Merrimack River, the sewer to be laid in the most 
economical location. It is further recommended that the size 
of this sewer from the Village to the river be increased to 24 
inches to accommodate the industrial wastes from the Shawsheen 
Mills, provided the American Woolen Company assume its 
fair share of the cost of construction and operation. It is further 
recommended that the Town cooperate with the American 
Woolen Company by receiving into the outfall sewer under proper 
legal safeguards, a part of the waste from the Marland Mills 
along with the wastes from the Shawsheen Mills and arrange to 
care for a part of the wastes from the Tyer Rubber Company and 
the Smith and Dove Manufacturing Company by the town 
sewers, provided satisfactory agreements with the interested 
riparian owners can be made. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Weston & Sampson 

Consulting Engineers 

We feel that this work should be carried out during the ensuing 
year and there is an article in the warrant asking for a bond issue 
of $150,000.00. This amount and the amount of $65,000.00 

11 



promised to us by the American Woolen Company, if the sewer is 
carried to the Merrimack River, it is estimated, will cover the 
cost of this work. 

At the last town meeting $5000.00 was appropriated to defray 
the expense of the special engineers employed to investigate this 
problem. Of this amount we have paid $1572.34 and we would 
recommend the appropriation of the unexpended balance to 
cover the remainder of their expense. 

The Sewer Bonded Debt 

The bonded debt of the sewer system January 1, 1922, was 
$113,000.00. During the year $7000.00 was paid from the Town 
Treasury on this indebtedness, leaving a total indebtedness of the 
system on January 1, 1923, $106,000.00. 

Of this amount $30,000.00 is redeemable by the sinking fund 
which on January 1, 1923, amounted to $23,005.01. 

The sum of $1000.00 should be appropriated for the sinking 
fund for the year 1923. 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Under the maintenance appropriation the usual work was done 
during the year 1922 as follows: Gutters, catch-basins were 
cleaned out, roads patched, repaired and the Tarvia roads 
blanketed where necessary. There were several drains installed 
and also some culvert work. There were a good many wash-outs 
during the year which caused a very considerable expense. 

Under construction the only new work done was the rebuilding 
of Phillips Street, a detailed cost of which will be found in the 
Superintendent's report. Owing to the unusual expense in the 
maintenance department we found it necessary to transfer the 
sum of $7586.64 from the Construction Department which ac- 
counts for the fact that we were not able to do more construction. 

Under the bond issue of last year Main Street was reconstructed 
from the square to the top of the hill and the report on this work 
is as follows: 

Reconstruction of Main Street 

At the annual meeting of March 13, 1922, the Town voted the 
sum of $100,000.00 for the reconstruction of Main Street, be- 
tween Chapel Avenue and Campion's corner, the work to be done 
under the direction of the Board of Public Works. 

12 



The State Board of Public Works, through the late J. N. Cole, 
offered to assist us in drawing up plans and specifications and 
calling for bids. We accepted their offer. 

On April 11, 1922, the State Board of Public Works called for 
bids to be opened on April 25, 1922. 

On April 25, 1922, all the members of the local Board of Public 
Works were present at the opening of the bids. 

The bids called for unit prices on all items in the specifications 
of two schemes. Scheme (1) required a granite block pavement 
on a concrete base throughout the entire distance to the junc- 
tion of School and Main Streets; above that to Chapel Avenue, 
macadam. Scheme (2) required a reinforced concrete pavement 
between Morton and Chestnut Streets, the rest of the way, 
granite block pavement on a concrete base. The Board took the 
awarding of bids under advisement. 

At a meeting of the Board on April 28, 1922, the matter of 
awarding bids was considered and it was voted to construct 
Main Street, according to the plans and specifications of Scheme 
(1). The contract was awarded to M. McDonough Company 
Swampscott, Mass., that company being the lowest bidder. 

Work was started by the contractor on May 31, 1922, and was 
completed about November 1, 1922. The time limit for the 
completion of the job was August 15, 1922, but on account of 
unavoidable causes the time limit was extended. The cost of 
reconstruction of Main Street under Scheme (1) is as follows: 



Paid on contract 


$106508.32 


Paid contractor for extra work 


4634.83 


Advertising for bids 


44.85 


Wooden stakes for engineers 


31.28 


C. B. and M. H. frames and covers 


357.50 


Pay roll of engineers 


2394.00 


Trimming curbs 


78.34 


Certification and preparation of bonds 


215.00 


Incidentals 


197.77 


Total 


$114461.89 


Credits 


304.74 


Total cost of job 


$114157.15 



13 



The Board feels that the demand for better roads is increasing 
year by year and the traffic going over these roads is also increas- 
ing. Owing to these indisputable facts it seems that the appro- 
priations for the use of the highway department should be in- 
creased instead of decreased. According to this policy we 
recommend the appropriation of $80,000.00 for the Highway 
Department for the ensuing year; $40,000.00 of this is for new 
construction and $40,000.00 for maintenance. The increase of 
$10,000.00 for maintenance over last year's appropriation is 
accounted for by the very excessive cost of snow removal which 
we have encountered the last winter which is estimated at from 
$10,000.00 to $12,000.00. 

PARK DEPARTMENT 

The sum of $1200.00 is recommended for the maintenance of 
the Park Department for the ensuing year. 

Rogers Brook 

At the last annual Town Meeting on March 13, 1922, the Board 
of Public Works was required to bring in a report and recom- 
mendation at the next annual meeting, of the conditions of 
Rogers Brook. 

The capacity of this brook between the park and Bartlet 
Street is insufficient to take the flow of water in extreme 
stormy weather and thaws. We would recommend that the 
culvert on Chestnut Street be replaced with one of greater 
capacity. The brook between Chestnut Street and Bartlet 
Street made much wider and deeper. 

We are informed by counsel that, as the Town is an abutter 
and user of this brook, the Town could cooperate with the other 
abutters in bearing the expense of this work. But the Town 
would not be justified in bearing all the expense. 

THOMAS E. RHODES 
PHILIP L. HARDY 
ARTHUR T. BOUTWELL 
WILLIAM D. McINTYRE 
EDWARD SHATTUCK 

14 



REDEMPTION OF BONDS 

To redeem Water Loan 



No. 3 due 1923 $10000.00 
No. 4 " 1925 15000.00 
No. 5 " 1928 5000.00 



Water S 

Balance Jan. 1, 1922 
Appropriation March, 1922 
Interest on Deposits 


inking Fun 
Cr. 


D 

$35333 . 23 

750.00 

1326.77 


Redemption of No. 2, 1922 


$37410.00 
10000.00 

$27410.00 



Dr. 
Water Loan Deposits 
Andover National Bank $16339 . 25 



Andover Savings Bank 

To redeem Sewer Bonds, due 1928 



11070.75 



27410.00 
30000.00 



Cr. 
Sewer Sinking Fund 



Balance Jan. 1, 1922 
Appropriation March, 1922 
Interest on Deposits 



$21042.05 

1000.00 

962.96 



Balance Jan. 1, 1923 

Dr. 
Sewer Loan Deposits 
Andover National Bank Book No. 2 



23005.01 
23005.01 



23005.01 



Note: In addition to the above bonds we have $101,000 
Serial Water Bonds, and $76,000 Serial Sewer Bonds. 

15 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



To the Board of Public Works: 

Gentlemen: — 

I herewith submit the thirty-fourth annual report of the 
Water Department, the twenty-sixth of the Sewer Department 
and the tenth of the Highway and Park Departments, together 
with a brief summary of work performed in each department for 
the year ending December 31st, 1922. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

We have added during the year 1922 to our main pipe lines, 
1272 feet of 6-inch pipe on Tewksbury Street, B. Vale, at a cost 
of $2009.54 or about $1.58 per foot. On Carmel Street 409 feet of 
6-inch pipe. There were several yards of ledge on this job and a 
ditch full of water most of the time. This work cost $968.10 or 
$2.37 per foot; 809 feet of 6-inch pipe was laid for Phillips 
Academy. On Lowell Street we have added 6367 feet of 10-inch 
pipe from the West Church to Shawsheen Village. On Haverhill 
Street 1736 feet of 10-inch pipe was laid but this work was stopped 
on account of frost. There still remains about 1980 feet to lay in 
the spring. Pipe has been laid on eight different streets for the 
American Woolen Company. They furnished the pipe, did all 
the digging and back filling but the town laid the same, set gates, 
the necessary hydrants and supplies, charging for all work done. 
The following table will show the streets on which pipe has been 
laid together with number of hydrants and valves set during the 
year. 



16 





Pipe 


Hydrants Valves 


Tewksbury St. B. Vale 


1272—6" 


2 


3 


Carmel St. 


409—6" 


1 


2 


Lowell St. 


6367—10" 


10 


22 


Haverhill St. 


1736—10" 


5 


10 


Phillips Academy (Private) 


890—6" 


1 


4 


Arundal St. 


300—6" 




1 


Argyle St. 


500—6" 


1 


3 


Balmoral St. 


780—6" 


2 


2 


Enmore St. 


1500—6" 


2 


3 


York St. 


520—6" 


1 


1 


Carisbrooke St. 


800—6" 


1 


3 


Riverina Rd. 


900—6" 


2 


3 


Athletic Field 


991—6" 


2 


4 


Total laid 1922 


16965 ft. 


30 


61 


Previously reported 


276867 ft. 


388 
418 




Total 


293832 




Discontinued 1922 


2636—6" 


4 
414 




Total Jan. 1, 1923 


291196 




or 


55. 15 miles 


414 





or 55.15 miles 

Discontinued pipe 1736 on Haverhill St., 900 on Burnham Rd. 

There were two (2) connections made for fire lines, one in the 
new Garage on Haverhill Street and the other in the new Office 
building. On account of the new layout on Burnham Road, by 
the County Commissioners, 900 feet of pipe and two hydrants were 
cut out but connected at York Street and cut in on our new 10- 
inch line at Haverhill Street. All hydrants from the corner of 
Main Street on Haverhill Street are of the large opening, giving 
full opening of 6-inch with 8-inch connections from the 10-inch 
main. All hydrants on Main Street, five in number, from near 
the residence of Judge Chandler to Chestnut Street were replaced 
with Corey hydrants and independent gates, the old ones having 
no gates and being of a type on which no repairs could be made. 
All valves on the street were dug up, oiled and packed so that 
all precautions were taken, as far as possible, by the Department, 
before the street was built. 

We have pumped at Haggetts Pond during the year, 365 days 
using the steam plant 361 days, and the oil 4 days, 262,078,700 
gallons or an average of 718,024 gallons daily, the largest amount 
ever pumped for Andover. The hours average for pumping 

17 



10.39 daily. The day on which the greatest amount was pumped 
was September the 25th, the amount being 1,014,858 gallons. 
The Water receipts were very large this year, amounting to 
$31,831.38. A new plant is needed at this station, as the Oil 
Engine is too small and the steam plant is fast wearing out (by 
age) and the repairs are amounting up very fast. I would recom- 
mend a centifugal pump, electric driven. 

The station on Bancroft Road has given us another year of 
excellent service. We have bought a Manograph which will be 
installed at the Haggett's Station in the early spring, and which 
can be used on any line to check up and measure water flows. 

The Engineer's house at the Pond has had some necessary re- 
pairs. A new bath room was installed, and some painting and 
papering done and the house itself received two coats of paint. 
These repairs cost $600.00. 

Our Telemeter Line was overhauled and new wire put up this 
year. The work was done by the Telephone Company at a cost 
of $978.52. For the coming year I would recommend for Main- 
tenance, the sum of $37,000.00: 



Salaries and labor 


$12000.00 


300 tons coal 


3500.00 


Engine and cylinder oil 


800.00 


Power No. 2 station 


1500.00 


Keeping horse 


400.00 


Car, expenses 


300.00 


Repairs 


500.00 


Miscellaneous 


1000.00 


Tools 


350.00 


Fence No. 1 reservoir and house 


1000.00 


Retirement of bonds 


10000.00 


Interest on bonds 


4900.00 


Sinking fund 


750.00 




$37000.00 


Service Pipes 





W 7 e laid during 1922, 147 new service pipes, this being the 
largest number laid since 1891 when 153 were laid. 



18 



We have now in use 1800 service pipes of which amount 1745 
are metered. During the year 117 meters, varying in sizes from 
5-8 to 6 inches, were set. All services were changed over from 
the main on Main Street to the street line so to avoid later trouble. 
New ones were also put in wherever there was a vacant lot. This 
work cost the town, for 59 changes and eight new ones, $1373.75. 

For service pipes this year, I would recommend the sum of 
$2500.00 and receipts. 

Receipts for 1922 

For service pipe and meters $18495 . 48 

Water rates 31831.38 

Paid Town treasurer, water rates $31831.38 

Paid Town Treasurer, Pipe 'account 18495.48 



$50326.86 $50326.86 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

The regular care of Filter beds and general work is all that was 
done in 1922 in this department. For 1923 I would recommend 
the sum of $3000.00. 

House Connections 

Twenty-six applications were received and laid, making a total 
of 788 now in use. 

Common Sewers 

The Lowell Street sewer was completed, a distance of 1740 
feet. The amount spent on this work was $2927.42. 



19 



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SUMMARY COST OF CONSTRUCTION 

WATER DEPARTMENT 



Designation 


Approved 
Bills 


Credits 


Net Cost 
1922 


Totals 


Office Fixtures .... 

Telemeters 

Telephones 

Teams 

Pipe Distribution .... 

Service Pipe 

Water and Land .... 

Suction Pipe 

Reservoir . . . 

Coal Shed 

Grading Lands 

Work Shop 

Buildings at Pumping Station. 
Pumping Plants .... 

Construction Ex 

Tools 

Maintenance 


$ 

978.52 

41868.88 
14263.01 

598.91 
22968.55 


$ 

6064.57 
12090.13 

340.78 


$ 

978.52 

35804.31 
2172.88 

598.91 

22627.77 


$ 561.75 

2290.15 

184.77 

583.65 

292528.54 

36430.98 

6687 . 23 

1309.46 

16985.82 

806.97 

1739.12 

1271.88 

9610.14 

47933.54 

9406.21 

4192.05 




$80677.87 


$18495.48 


$62182.39 


$432572.26 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 



Sewer Main in feet 


55900 






Number of Filter Beds 




28 




Number of Sludge Beds 




3 




Cost to Abutters 






$135361.74 


Cost to Town 






197864.11 




55900 


31 


$333225.85 



24 





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HIGHWAYS AND PARKS 



To the Board of Public Works: — 
Gentlemen: — 

I submit for your approval, the tenth annual report of the 
Highway Department for the year ending December 31, 1922. 
We started the year shovelling gutters and sanding sidewalks. We 
had a severe rain on March 7th, causing lots of damage, followed 
by another on May 5th which caused a number of wash-outs, the 
most severe one being at the corner of Haverhill and High 
Streets which cost $1500. There were several other wash-outs 
costing from $25. to $300. each. There has been a 30-inch cor- 
rugated pipe put across Chestnut Street, through private land 
for a distance of 250 feet: this pipe takes water from Summer 
Street and Abbott's field. A 12-inch Akron pipe was laid on 
Chestnut Street for a distance of 230 feet. A catch-basin at the 
corner of Avon Street was put in and a corner of Avon Street was 
curbed. River Road was scarified, patched and resurfaced with a 
coat of Tarvia, this work costing $3033.81. 

We started patching roads on March 22nd and blanketing on 
May 15th, using 35,500 gallons of Tarvia B. This work can be 
cut down in 1923 as several of these streets can go for awhile. A 
culvert on Central Street caved in, the large cover-stone over the 
brook was moved, and it was necessary to dig up and repair one 
half of this. The culvert was put back with a concrete cap, 
reinforced with steel rails. This work cost $885.00. Gutters 
throughout the town have been cleaned out, and catch-basins 
have had to be cleaned out several times on account of so much 
rain during the early spring and summer. 

Several cinder roads were built last fall and winter. These were 
paid for out of the 1922 appropriation. These were scraped in the 
spring and put in first class shape for a country road. Many 
streets were treated with the material from Main Street, Highland 

26 



Road, Woodland Road, Phillips Street, Red Spring Road and 
Carmel Street. Carmel Street leads to the new Town Home and 
will need a little more gravel or cinders this spring. 

The only new work done this year was on Phillips and Main 
Streets. Phillips Street was paid for out of the regular appropri- 
ation and the following amounts will show the cost of the work: 



4613 feet of curbing 


$5460.08 


Setting curb 


1845.00 


Labor 


3511.28 


Essex Trap Rock Construction Co. 


2072.77 


B. & M. R.R. 


1353.67 


Barrett Mfg. Co. (Tar) 


1748.12 


Gravel for filling 


999.00 


Corrugated pipe 


40.00 


E. P. Hall (catch-basin) 


102.50 


Coal 


105.32 


Covers for catch-basins 


103.60 



$17331.34 
This job cost $2.72 per yard including all material or for road 
work alone (curbing out $1.57 per yard). We received a credit 
for this work from Phillips and Abbot Academies of $2100.62 
making the total cost of the work to the town $15,230.72. The 
Main Street work, cost and account will be found in the Board of 
Public Works report. Our expenses wefe so heavy this year that 
little new work could be done and the heavy rains we had caused 
considerable additional costs. I would recommend for Main- 
tenance for the year 1923 : 

Labor and Teams $ 1 2000 . 00 

Blanketing streets 3000 . 00 

Sidewalk work 3000 . 00 

Gravel and ashes 5000 . 00 

Snow 12000.00 

Drainage 2000.00 

Upkeep, team and car 1000.00 

Miscellaneous 1 000 . 00 

Bridges 1000.00 



27 



$40000.00 



Financial Statement 

Appropriation, March 1922 

Highway Department, Maintenance 
Highway Department, Construction 
Credits 

Expenditures 

Maintenance 

Construction 

Sidewalk 

Snow 

Tools 

Drains 

Bridges 



Overdrawn 



PARK DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation 1922 

Expended, for Park, Playstead and 
Boulders 
Balance 



( 


$30000.00 




30000.00 




3163.55 


$33963 . 52 




22413.36 




748.66 




4264.38 




238.02 




2101.68 




60.89 




$63790.51 






626.96 



$63790.51 $63790.51 



$1200.00 



$1193.54 
6.46 



$1200.00 $1200.00 
The same sum recommended for 1923, $1200.00. 



28 



CONSTRUCTION 

I would propose that Essex Street, from the Boston and Maine 
R.R. crossing up Shawsheen Road to the top of the hill near 
Smith's driveway, be built. This will cost about $10000. 00 

as both sides of the hill should be curbed and catch 
basin at top of the hill and piped to brook at the 
bottom of the hill. 

Park Street should be curbed for a distance of 
about 450 feet with a sidewalk from Buchan & 
McNally's to Florence Street, at a cost of 

William Street 

Stevens Street 

Abbot Street (3120 yards— 2.00) 

B. & M. R.R. approach 

Andover Street, resurfaced 



(Recommend the sum of $40,000.00) 



1800. 


00 


4000. 


00 


8000. 


00 


6000. 


00 


5000.00 


8000. 


00 


$42800.00 



29 



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TOWN OF ANDOVER 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Receipts and Expenditures 




FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1923 



ANDOVER, MASS. 
THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1924 



CONTENTS 



Accountant's Report 


30 


Interest 




54 


Almshouse Expense 


59 


Jury List 




73 


New Almshouse 


61 


Liabilities 




S3 


Relief out of 


60 


Librarian's Report 




142 


Aiding Mothers 


62 


Memorial Day 




53 


Andover Post No. 8 


54 


Memorial Hall Library 


51, 


117 


Animal Inspector 


70 


Miscellaneous 




56 


Appropriations, 1923 


17 


Moth Superintendent's Report 




64 


Art Gallery 


142 


Moth Suppression 




48 


Assessors' Report 


63 


Municipal Properties 




72 


Assets 


84 


Notes Given 




55 


Auditors' Report 
Board of Health 
Board of Health Nurse 


92 
46 

80 


Notes Paid 
Overseeis of the Poor 
Police 


45, 


55 
58 
65 


Board of Public Works 
Sewer Sinking Funds 
Water Sinking Funds 


Appendix 
51 
51 


Printing and Stationery 
Punchard Free School, Report 
Trustees 


of 


47 
93 


Bonds, Redemption of 


57 


Retirement of Veterans 




53 


Brush Fires 


43 


Schools 




37 


Building Inspector's Report 
Collector's Account 
Cornell Fund 
County Tax 
Dog Tax 
Dump, Care of 


71 
76 

78 
52 
52 
53 


Soldiers' Relief 

Spring Grove Cemetery 

State Aid 

State and Highway Tax 

Street Lighting 

Tax Collector 


49, 


60 
68 
60 
52 
50 
76 


Election and Registration 
Financial Report 


44 
37 


Town House 
Town Meeting 




41 
12 


Fire Department 


42, 79 


Town Meetings, Special 


23, 


28 


Fire Truck 


43 


Town Officers 


4, 


39 


Finance Committee 


121 


Town Warrant 


7, 


97 


G. A. R. Post 99 


53 


Treasurer's Report 




84 


Hay Scales 


50 


Tree Warden 


48, 


64 


Insurance 


50 


War Memorial Committee 




55 



TOWN OFFICERS 1923 



Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor 



Term expires 1926 
11 1924 
" 1925 

Term expires 1926 
" 1924 

11 1925 



FRANK H. HARDY, Chairman 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN, Secretary 

A ssessors 
FRANK H. HARDY, Chairman 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN, Secretary 

Town Clerk 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Town Treasurer 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Tax Collector 
WILLIAM B. CHEEVER 

School Committee 
ERNEST A. JOHNSON 
EVERETT C. HILTON 
MARY W. FRENCH 
DAVID R. LAWSON 
ROY H. BRADFORD 
DOUGLAS G. CRAWFORD 
W. DUDLEY YATES 
FREDERICK E. CHEEVER 
ALFRED E. STEARNS 

Superintendent of Schools 
HENRY C. SANBORN 

Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund Commission 
PHILIP L. HARDY Term expires 1924 

11 1924 
11 1925 
" 1925 
11 1926 



Term 


expires 


1924 




< 




1924 
1924 




i 


ti 


1924 




t 


n 


1925 




i 


u 


1925 




t 


il 


1925 




i 


It 


1926 




i 


u 


1926 



WILLIAM D. McINTYRE 
ARTHUR T. BOUTWELL 
EDWARD SHATTUCK 
WALTER I. MORSE 



Superintendent of Water, Sewer Department, Highways and Parks 
FRANK L. COLE 

Engineers of Fire Department 
CHARLES F. EMERSON, Chief 
LLEWELLYN D. POMEROY, Clerk 
HARRY E. WELLS 



Board of Health 
FRANKLIN H. STACEY 
CHARLES E. ABBOTT, M.D. 
BANCROFT T. HAYNES 



Term expires 1924 
11 1925 
" 1926 



Chief of Police 
FRANK M. SMITH 



Constables 



JAMES NAPIER 
FRANK M. SMITH 
GEORGE N. SPARKS 



Term expires 1924 
11 1924 
" 1924 



Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 
BURTON S. FLAGG Term expires 1924 



E. KENDALL JENKINS 
REV. FREDERICK A. WILSON 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 
NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 
PHILIP F. RIPLEY 
ALFRED E. STEARNS 



1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 



Trustees of Punchard Free School — Terms expire 1925 

FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL JOHN H. CAMPION 

MYRON E. GUTTERSON HARRY H. NOYES 

EDMOND E. HAMMOND 



A uditors 

JOHN S. ROBERTSON WALTER H. COLEMAN 

HARRY SELLARS 



Trustees of Cornell Fund 

DR. WILLIAM D. WALKER Term expires 1924 

CHARLES N. MARLAND " " 1925 

JOHN C. ANGUS " " 1926 

Superintendent of Moth Department 
EDWARD H. BERRY 

Tree Warden 
EDWARD H. BERRY 

Moderator of Town Meetings 
ALFRED L. RIPLEY 

Registrars of Voters 
SAMUEL P. HULME JOHN F. HURLEY 

PATRICK J. SCOTT GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Clerk 

Trustees Spring Grove Cemetery 
WALTER I. MORSE DANIEL H. POOR 

FRED E. CHEEVER FRED A. SWANTON 

EVERETT M. LUNDGREN DAVID R. LAWSON 

JOHN W. STARK 

Street Lighting Committee 
WALTER H. COLEMAN HENRY J. GARDNER 

FREDERIC G. MOORE JAMES C. SOUTER 

FRED G. CHENEY 

Finance Committee 
HENRY A. BODWELL, Chairman GEORGE ABBOT 
JOHN C. ANGUS, Secretary CHESTER W. HOLLAND 

EDWARD V. FRENCH GEORGE H. WINSLOW 

GEORGE L. AVERILL 



TOWN WARRANT 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ss.: To either of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town w 10 are qualified 
to vote in elections and in town affairs to meet and assemble at 
the designated polling places in Precincts One, Two, Three and 
Four, viz : The Town House in Precinct One ; t le Old School 
House, Ballardvale, in Precinct Two; the Boys' Club House, 
Shawsheen Village, in Precinct Three; and the Phillips Club 
House, School Street, in Precinct Four, in said Andover, on 
Monday, The Fifth Day of March, 1923, at 6 o'clock a.m., 
to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To elect a Moderator for one year, Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for one 
year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, 
one member of the Board of Assessors for three years, three 
members of the School Committee for three years, one member 
of the Board of Public Works for three years, one member of 
the Board of Health for three years, three Auditors of Accounts 
for one year, three Constables for one year, one Trustee of 
Memorial Hall Library for seven years, one Trustee of Memorial 
Hall Library for six years (to fill vacancy), one Tree Warden 
for one year and all town officers required by law to be elected 
by ballot. Also to take action on the following questions: 
Shall licences be granted for the sale of certain non-intoxicating 
beverages in this town? "Shall the town petition for the instal- 
lation of an accounting system by the Commonwealth? (This 
question is submitted under the provisions of Chapter 516, 
Acts of 1922.) " 



All to be voted for on one ballot. The polls will be open 
from 6 o'clock a.m. to 5 o'clock p.m. 

After final action on the preceding Article one, the said meeting 
shall stand adjourned by virtue of Section 20, Chapter 39, of 
the General Laws, to Monday, March 12th, at 1.30 o'clock p.m. 
at the Town Hall, then and there to act Upon the following 
Articles, namely: 

Article 2. — To elect all other officers not required by law to 
be elected by ballot. 

Article 3.- — To determine what sums of money shall be appro- 
priated for Almshouse Expenses, Relief out of Almshouse, 
Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children, Board of Health, 
Brush Fires, Fire Department, Hay Scales, Highway Depart- 
ment, Insurance, Interest, Memorial Hall Library, Memorial 
Day, Post 99, G.A.R., Miscellaneous, Parks and Playsteads, 
Police, Printing and Stationery, Election and Registration, 
Public Dump, Retirement of Veterans, Redemption of Water. 
Sewer, High School, Main Street and Shawsheen Bridge Bonds, 
Schools, Sewer Maintenance, Sewer Sinking Funds, Soldiers' 
Relief, Spring Grove Cemetery, State Aid, Street Lighting, 
Town Officers, Town House, Tree Warden, Moth Department, 
Water Maintenance, Construction and Sinking Funds, Andover 
Post No. 8, American Legion, and other town charges and 
expenses. 

Article 4. — To see if the town will vote to appropriate the 
sum of $6000.00 to pay the unpaid bills contracted by the Alms- 
house Building Committee, and to build a combination Barn 
and Garage, on petition of the Selectmen. 

Article 5.— To see if the Town will vote to purchase a com- 
bination truck and ambulance for the use of the Police Depart- 
ment and appropriate the sum of $700.00 for the same, on 
petition of the Selectmen. 

Article 6. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$14,157.15 in addition to the balance on hand of $1140.29 to pay 
for bills due for extra work done in the reconstruction of Main 
Street, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 7. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$10,000.00 for granolithic sidewalks on either side of Main 



Street and do necessary grading, on petition of the Board of 
Public Works. 

Article 8. — To see if the Town will accept the provisions of 
an Act of the Legislature of 1923 "Authorizing the Town of 
Andover to construct an Outfall Sewer for the Disposal of its 
Sewage." 

Also to see if the Town will vote to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town in the aggregate amount of one hundred and fifty thousand 
($150,000.) dollars for the purpose of paying the necessary 
expenses and liabilities incurred under this act, the indebtedness 
under this act to be in excess of the statutory limit, but, except 
as otherwise provided therein, subject to Chapter Forty-four 
of the General Laws, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 9. — To see if the Town will authorize and direct the 
School Committee to petition the General Court of 1923 for 
authority to borrow the sum of two hundred and sixty-eight 
thousand ($268,000.) dollars outside the statutory limit of in- 
debtedness, by bond issue or otherwise, for the following purposes. 

To grade and loam the lot and to build and equip a new 
grammar school building, to be located on the land given by the 
American Woolen Company and accepted by the town, situated 
at the junction of and between Corbett Street and Magnolia 
Avenue, on petition of the School Committee. 

Article 10. — -To see if the Town will vote to purchase a Motor 
Ladder Truck for the Fire Department and appropriate a sum 
of $15,000.00 for the same, on petition of William C. Crowley 
and others. 

Article 11 — To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to extend the water main from the present termina- 
tion of same on Corbett Street at premises of Antonio Catanzaro, 
a distance of seventeen hundred (1700) feet along said Corbett 
Street to the main entrance to the Sacred Heart Cemetery, 
and appropriate a sum of money sufficient therefor, on petition 
of Edward Topping and others. 

Article 12. — To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of 
$10,000.00 to lay a 6-inch water main on Chandler Road, to the 
residence of William F. Trauschke and others, on petition of 
William F. Trauschke and others. 



Article 13. — To see if the Town will accept the provisions 
of Section 85 of Chapter 32 of the General Laws of Massachu- 
setts entitled "Pensions for Policemen and Firemen," on petition 
of Colver J. Stone and others. 

Article 14 — To hear and act on the report of the War Memo- 
rial Committee. 

Article 15- — To see if t le Town will deed back to the Boston & 
Maine Railroad a certain piece of land situated in Ballard Vale, 
deeded to the town from the said Boston & Maine Railroad 
September 16th, 1871, on the express condition that neither the 
land nor the building thereon be used for any other purpose 
than housing fire apparatus, on petition of the Selectmen. 

Article 16.- — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 17. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in anticipation of the revenue of the 
current financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

Article 18. — To determine what disposition shall be made of 
unexpended appropriations. 

Article 19. — To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

Article 20. — To determine the amount of money to be raised 
by taxation the ensuing year. 

Article 21.- — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof, seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this twenty-first day of February, 
A.D. 1923. 

WALTER S. DONALD 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Selectmen of A ndover 



10 



Anbover, March 5th, 1923 
Essex, ss. 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants 
of said town to meet at the time and places and for the purposes 
stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the 
same on the Town House, on each schoolhouse and in no less 
than five other public places, where bills and notices are usually 
posted. Said warrants have been posted and published seven 
days. 

FRANK M. SMITH, 

Constable 



11 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 5, 1923 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to vote in town affairs convened in Precincts One, Two, 
Three and Four in said Andover on Monday, the Fifth day of 
March 1923, at six o'clock in the forenoon, agreeably to the 
requirements of the foregoing warrant, took up Article One and 
proceeded to vote for Town Officers and on the License and 
Accounting questions. 

The ballot boxes were found to be empty and registered 0000. 
The polls opened at 6 o'clock a.m. and closed at 5 o'clock p.m. 
The total number of ballots cast was 2306. Viz: Precinct One 
1308, Precinct Two 245, Precinct Three 451, Precinct Four 302. 

The result of the balloting was as follows: 
Moderator — One year: 
Precincts 

12 3 4 
956 182 362 275 Alfred L. Ripley 1775 

1 John Traynor 1 

352 63 88 27 Blanks 530 

Town Clerk — One Year : 

984 198 365 269 George A. Higgins 1816 

324 47 86 33 Blanks 490 

Town Treasurer — One Year : 

944 188 360 268 George A. Higgins 1760 

364 57 91 34 Blanks 546 

Selectman — Three Years : 

139 30 70 47 George L. Averill 286 

324 58 35 26 Martin Doherty 443 

435 95 282 179 Frank H. Hardy 991 

47 2 2 1 William G. McDermitt 52 

334 54 57 47 James C. Souter 492 

29 6 5 2 Blanks 42 

12 



145 


28 


69 


56 


George L. Averill 


316 


56 


32 


24 


Martin Doherty 


413 


91 


273 


163 


Frank H. Hardy 


48 


1 


3 


1 


William G. McDermitt 


333 


52 


56 


46 


James C. Souter 


53 


17 


18 


12 


Blanks 



Assessor — Three Years: 

298 
428 
940 
53 
487 
100 

Collector of Taxes — One Year : 

948 185 368 265 William B. Cheever 1766 

360 60 83 37 Blanks 540 

School Committee — Three Years : 

875 158 306 268 Frederick E. Cheever 1607 

934 153 301 247 Edward C. Conroy 1635 

902 150 310 264 Alfred E. Stearns 1626 

1213 274 436 127 Blanks 2050 

Trustee of Memorial Hall Library — Seven Years: 

915 164 357 275 Alfred E. Stearns 1711 

1 John Tray nor 1 

393 81 93 27 Blanks 594 

Trustee of Memorial Hall Library — Six Years (to fill 
vacancy) : 
889 150 343 269 Philip F. Ripley 1651 

419 95 108 33 Blanks 655 

Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund Commission — 

548 
907 
749 
102 

Board of Health — Three Years: 

866 201 354 257 Bancroft T. Haynes 1678 

442 44 97 45 Blanks 628 

13 



Three Years: 






242 179 71 


56 


Edward P. Hall 


557 19 186 


145 


Walter I. Morse 


455 44 156 


94 


Thomas E. Rhodes 


54 3 38 


7 


Blanks 



Auditors of Accounts — One Year: 

824 169 310 251 Walter H. Coleman 1554 

901 157 288 239 John S. Robertson 1585 

872 153 288 245 Harry Sellars 1558 

1327 256 467 171 Blanks 2221 

Constables — One Year: 

815 143 292 242 James Napier 1492 

835 149 317 246 Frank M. Smith 1547 

851 196 304 250 George N. Sparks 1601 

1423 247 440 168 Blanks 2278 

Tree Warden — One Year : 

931 177 355 255 Edward H. Berry 1718 

1 John Traynor 1 

377 68 95 47 Blanks 587 

Shall Licenses be granted for the sale of certain Non-Intoxicating 

Beverages in this town? 

492 75 146 71 Yes 784 

532 101 210 195 No 1038 

284 69 95 36 Blanks 484 

Shall the town petition for the installation of an Accounting 

System by the Commonwealth? (This question is submitted 

under the provisions of Chapter 516, Acts of 1922.) 

254 49 148 63 Yes 514 

520 74 141 159 No 894 

534 122 162 80 Blanks 898 

All the foregoing officers and questions were voted on by ballot 
and the check lists were used. 

REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT ONE 

Andover, March 5th, 1923 
Polls opened at 6 a.m. closed at 5 p.m. Ballot box registered 
at opening 0000, when closed 1307, being one less than the actual 
number cast. Number of ballots received 2099, number of bal- 
lots returned 791. Number of ballots cast 1308. Number of 
female votes cast 483. Number of male votes cast 825. 

MARK M. KEANE, Clerk 
14 



REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT TWO 

Ballard vale, March 5, 1923 

Polls opened at 6 a.m. and closed at 5 p.m. Ballot box reg- 
istered at opening 0000. Ballot box registered when polls closed 
245. Number of ballots received 450. Number of ballots cast 
245. Number of ballots returned 205. Warden Clester Mat- 
thews in charge. Constable George N. Sparks on duty. 

JOSEPH P. LYNCH, Clerk 



REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT THREE 

Sh a wsheen Village, March 5, 1923 

Polls opened at 6 a.m. and closed at 5 p.m. Ballot box reg- 
istered at opening 0000. Ballot box registered when polls closed 
451. Number of ballots cast 451. Number of ballots received 
700. Number of ballots returned 249. 

HENRY J. LAVERY, Clerk 



REPORT OF CLERK— PRECINCT FOUR 

Andover, March 5, 1923 

Polls opened at 6 a.m. at the Phillips Club on Main Street, 
with Warden H. S. Hopper in charge. Ballot box read 0000. 
The polls closed at 5 p.m. with a total of 302 votes cast. Total 
number of ballots received 650. Total number of ballots re- 
turned 348. 

R. J. WINTERS, Clerk 



After final action on Article One, the said meeting was ad- 
journed by virtue of Section 20, Chapter 39 of the General Laws, 
to Monday, March 12th, at 1.30 o'clock p.m. at the Town Hall. 

15 



1.30 O'CLOCK P. M. MONDAY, MARCH 12TH, 1923 

The Moderator declared : 
Alfred L. Ripley elected Moderator for one year. 
George A. Higgins elected Town Clerk for one year. 
George A. Higgins elected Town Treasurer for one year. 
Frank H. Hardy elected Selectman for three years. 
Frank H. Hardy elected Assessor for three years. 
William B. Cheever elected Collector of Taxes for one year. 

Frederick E. Cheever elected member of School Committee for 
three years. 

Edward C. Conroy elected member of School Committee for 
three years. 

Alfred E. Stearns elected member of School Committee for 
three years. 

Alfred E. Stearns elected Trustee of Memorial Hall Library 
for seven years. 

Philip F. Ripley elected Trustee of Memorial Hall Library for 
six years (to fill vacancy). 

Walter I. Morse elected member of Board of Public Works and 
Sinking Fund Commission for three years. 

Bancroft T. Haynes elected member of Board of Health for 
three years. 

Walter H. Coleman elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

John S. Robertson elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

Harry Sellars elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

James Napier elected Constable for one year. 

Frank M. Smith elected Constable for one year. 

George N. Sparks elected Constable for one year. 

Edward H. Berry elected Tree Warden for one year. 

Took up Article 2 : and chose 

John C. Angus, Trustee of Cornell Fund for three years. 

16 



Chose Finance Committee for one year (appointed by the 
Moderator): George Abbot, Henry A. Bodwell, Edward V. 
French, Chester W. Holland, George H. Winslow, John C. 
Angus, George L. Averill. 

Chose Street Lighting Committee for one year (appointed by 
the Moderator) : Walter H. Coleman, Fred G. Cheney, Henry J. 
Gardner, Frederic G. Moore, James C. Souter. 

Chose Memorial Committee for one year (appointed by the 
Moderator): Walter M. Lamont, John F. O'Connell, Claude M. 
Fuess, Henry A. Bodwell, Burton S. Flagg, E. V. French, E. 
Barton Chapin. 

Took up Article 3. 

Voted to appropriate the following stated sums of money : 



Almshouse 


$ 6600.00 


Almshouse, Relief Out of 


5000.00 


Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children 


2500.00 


Board of Health 


3600.00 


Brush Fires 


1000.00 


Elections and Registration 


600.00 


Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital 


2823.50 


Fire Department 


24000.00 


G. A. R. 


100.00 


Hay Scales 


125.00 


Highway Department 




Maintenance 


45000.00 


New Construction 


30000.00 


Interest 


20500.00 


Insurance 


6000.00 


Fire 


3500.00 


Workmen's Compensation 


2500.00 


Library, Memorial Hall 


4000.00 


Memorial Day 


550.00 


Miscellaneous 


1200.00 


Parks and Playsteads 


1200.00 


Police Department 


14500.00 


Amount carried forward 


$169298.50 



17 



Amount brought forward 




$169298.50 


Printing and Stationery 




2000.00 


Public Dump 




75.00 


Retirement of Veterans 




300.00 


Retirement of Bonds 




35500.00 


Sewer 


7000.00 


High School 


6000.00 


Shawsheen Bridge 


2500.00 


Main Street Construction 


20000 


.00 


Schools 




111883.00 


Sewer Department 




4000.00 


Labor and Power 


3000 


.00 


Sinking Fund 


1000.00 


Soldiers' Relief 




1500.00 


Military Aid 




200.00 


Spring Grove Cemetery 




5200.00 


State Aid 




600.00 


Street Lighting 




10000.00 


Town House 




3000.00 


Town Officers 




10400.00 


Tree Warden and Moth Work 




15000.00 


Water Department 




37000.00 


Water Department, Service Pipe 




2500.00 


Andover Post No. 8, American Legion 




900.00 


Article 4 — New Almshouse 




6500.00 


Article 5 — Police 




700.00 


Article 6 — Main St. 




14157.15 


Article 7 — Main St. Sidewalks 




3000.00 


Article 10 — Fire Dept., Ladder Truck 




10000.00 


Article 12 — Water, Chandler Road 




10000.00 




$453713.65 


State Tax (estimate) 




30000.00 


County Tax (estimate) 




20000.00 




$503713.65 



18 



Took up Article 4. 

Voted, at 2.50 p.m., To appropriate the sum of $6500. to pay 
the unpaid bills contracted by the Almshouse Building Commit- 
tee, and to build a combination barn and garage. 

Took up Article 5. 

Voted, at 3.05 p.m., To appropriate the sum of $700. for the 
purchase of a combination truck and ambulance for the use of the 
Police Department. 

Took up Article 6. 

Voted, at 3.10 p.m., To appropriate the sum of $14,157.15 in 
addition to the balance on hand of $1140.29 to pay for bills due 
for extra work done in the reconstruction of Main Street. 

Took up Article 7. 

Voted, at 3.35 p.m., To appropriate a sum not exceeding 
$3000. for granolithic sidewalks on either side of the business 
section of Main Street from Chestnut Street to Elm Square. 

Took up Article 8. 

Voted, at 3 37 p.m., That the town accept the provisions of 
Chapter 69 of the Acts of 1923, "Authorizing the Town of 
Andover to construct an Outfall Sewer for the Disposal of its 
Sewage." The vote stood Yeas 266, Nays none. 

Also voted, at 3.42 p.m., That under authority of and in com- 
pliance with Act of 1923, Chapter 69, entitled "An Act Authoriz- 
ing the Town of Andover to construct an Outfall Sewer for the 
Disposal of its Sewage," which has been duly accepted by the 
town, and for the purpose of paying the necessary expenses and 
liabilities incurred under said Act the sum of one hundred and 
fifty thousand (150,000) dollars be and the same is hereby ap- 
propriated, and to raise said amount the Town Treasurer is 
hereby authorized to prepare, issue and sell bonds or notes of the 
town in said principal amount of one hundred and fifty thousand 
(150,000) dollars bearing on face the words "Andover Sewer 
Loan, Act of 1923," signed by the Treasurer and countersigned by 
the Selectmen, bearing interest at a rate not exceeding five per 
cent per annum payable semi-annually. Said bonds or notes 

19 



shall be payable in accordance with section 19 of Chapter 44 of 
the General Laws, so that the whole of said loan shall be due and 
payable in not more than thirty (30) years from the date of issue. 
All other particulars as to the form, issuance and sale of said 
bonds or notes shall be determined by the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen. The vote stood Yeas 261, Nays none. 

Took up Article 9. 

Voted, at 4.00 p.m.. That the Town authorize and direct the 
School Committee to petition the General Court of 1923 for 
authority to borrow the sum of two hundred and thirty thousand 
(230.000^ dollars outside the statutory limit of indebtedness, by 
bond issue or otherwise, for the following purposes: 

To grade and loam the lot and to build and equip a new gram- 
mar school building, to be located on the land given by the 
American Woolen Company and accepted by the town, situated 
at the junction of and between Corbett Street and Magnolia 
Avenue. The vote was unanimous. 

Took up Article 10. 

Voted, at 4.04 p.m.. To appropriate the sum of $10,000. for the 
purchase of a Motor Ladder Truck for the Fire Department. 

Took up Article 11. 

Voted, at 4.07 p.m.. To refer to the Board of Public Works. 

Took up Article 12. 

Voted, at 4.23 p.m.. That the town appropriate the sum of 
00. to lay a 6-inch water main on Chandler Road to the 
residence of William F. Trauschke and others. 

Took up Article 13. 

Voted, at 4.24 p.m.. That the article be stricken from the 
warrant. 

Took up Article 14. 

Voted, at 5.22 p.m.. To accept the report of the Committee and 
that the work of the Committee be extended and they be re- 
quested to bring in a recommendation for a distinct War Memo- 
rial, omitting any plan for a civic center. 

20 



Took up Article 15. 

Voted, at 5.27 p.m., To deed back to the Boston & Maine 
Railroad a certain piece of land situated in Ballardvale deeded 
to the town from the said Boston & Maine Railroad, September 
16, 1871. 

Took up Article 16. 

Voted, at 5.28 p.m., That the taxes be collected by the Col- 
lector, that he receive a salary of $1800. per year and that in- 
terest be charged at the rate of six per cent per annum from 
October 15th, on all taxes remaining unpaid after November 1st. 

Took up Article 17. 

Voted, at 5.29 p.m., That the Town Treasurer, with the ap- 
proval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning January 1st, 1923, and to issue a note or 
notes therefor, payable within one year, any debt or debts in- 
curred under this vote to be paid from the revenue of said finan- 
cial year. 

Took up Article 18. 

Voted, at 5.30 p.m., That all unexpended appropriations be 
turned into the treasury with the exception of the balances 
named in the Treasurer's Report, viz: Water Loan, Special 
Sewer Survey, Main Street Loan, North Main Street appro- 
priation, Soldiers' Memorial Committee. 

Took up Article 19. 

Voted, at 5.31 p.m., That the Report of the Town Officers be 
accepted. 

Took up Article 20. 

Voted, at 5.32 p.m., To raise by taxation $353,000. plus an 
amount sufficient to meet the State and County Taxes, after 
deducting receipts from the State Income Tax. 

Took up Article 21. 

Voted, To add the word "private" in the Assessors' Street 
List to all streets which have not been accepted by the town. 

21 



Voted, That a vote of thanks be extended to the War Memo- 
rial Committee for their faithful work as shown in the plans 
presented to the town. 

Voted, at 5.40 p.m., That the meeting be dissolved. 

The foregoing is a true copy of the Warrant and of the Officers' 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings of the regular 
and adjourned meetings. 

Attest: 

GEORGE A. HIGGINS 
Town Clerk 



22 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, JUNE 12, 1923 
WARRANT 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ss.: To either of the Constables of the Town of An- 
cfover: Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to 
vote in town affairs to meet and assemble at the Town House in 
said Andover, on Tuesday, the Twelfth day of June, 1923, at 
8 o'clock p.m., to act on the following articles: 

/Article 1. — To see if the town will vote to appropriate the 
sum of two hundred thirty thousand ($230,000.) dollars for the 
purpose of building a new school building in that part of Andover 
known as Shawsheen Village and of purchasing furnishings and 
original equipment therefor, and for the purpose of raising all or a 
portion of said sum will authorize the Town Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen to prepare, issue and sell under author- 
ity of Chapter 272, Massachusetts Acts of 1923, bonds or notes 
outside the debt limit but otherwise subject to Chapter 44 of the 
General Laws, or take any action in relation thereto, on petition 
of the School Committee. 

Article 2. — To see if the Town will appoint and authorize a 
Committee to procure plans and specifications, obtain bids, let 
contracts, and approve bills for building, purchasing the furnish- 
ings, and equipping the new schoolhouse mentioned in Article 
One, on petition of the School Committee. 

Article 3. — To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to take in fee by eminent domain for school purposes, 
and award damages therefor, the land situated on Magnolia 
Avenue in Andover, and being lot numbered six (6) as shown on 
plan of land known as "Oakhurst Knolls," recorded in Essex 

23 



North District Registry of Deeds, book 238, page 600, said lot 
being bounded Northerly by lot numbered 7, as shown on said 
plan, 80 feet; Easterly by Magnolia Avenue, as shown on said 
plan, 50 feet; Southerly by lot numbered 5, as shown on said plan, 
SO feet; Westerly 50 feet as shown on said plan. Containing 
4000 square feet of land ; and to appropriate a sum not exceeding 
Seven hundred and fifty ($750.) dollars therefor, the same to be 
raised by taxation, on petition of the School Committee. 

Article 4. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
nine thousand ($9000.) dollars for the purpose of reconstructing 
Haverhill Street from North Main Street to a point near the 
Boston & Maine Railroad Bridge, provided the State and County 
severally appropriate a like sum, on petition of the Board of 
Public Works. 

Article 5.- — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
forty-five hundred ($4500.) dollars for putting in a new pump- 
ing unit at Haggetts Pond Station on recommendation of the 
Board of Public Works. 

Article 6. — To see if the town will accept as a Town Way, as 
laid out by the Selectmen, a street running from a point on 
Chestnut Street northerly about 716 feet and 48 feet in width to 
a point on Summer Street in accordance with a plan on file, on 
petition of Llewellyn D. Pomeroy and others. 

Article 7.; — To see if the town will appropriate a sum not 
exceeding $2500.00 for the purpose of lowering the bed of Rogers 
Brook from a point near center of the Public Park, to the opening 
of culvert at east side of Bartlet Street and installing necessary 
pipes and retaining walls, and such other work in the deepening 
and widening of Rogers Brook as may be found necessary, said 
work to be done under the supervision of the Board of Public 
Works, in cooperation with the abutting owners, on petition of 
W. Dudley Yates and others. 

Article 8. — To see what action, if any, the town will take 
in regard to the collection and disposal of its garbage and ashes, 
on petition of the Board of Health. 

24 



Article 9. — To act on any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof, seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this thirty-first day of May, A.D. 1923. 

FRANK H. HARDY 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Selectmen of Andover 



Andover, Mass., June 12, 1923 
Essex, ss. 

Pursuit to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabi- 
tants of said town to meet at the time and place and for the 
purposes stated in said warrant by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same on the Town House, on each schoolhouse and in 
no less than five other public places, where bills and notices are 
usually posted, and by publication in the Andover Townsman. 
Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

FRANK M. SMITH 

Constable 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to vote in town affairs convened in the Town House in 
said Andover, on Tuesday, the Twelfth day of June, 1923, at 
8 o'clock in the evening, agreeably to the requirements of the 
foregoing warrant, Moderator Alfred L. Pipley presided and read 
the warrant. 

Took up Article 1 . 

Voted, at 8.15 p.m., That the Town appropriate the sum of 
two hundred thirty thousand ($230,000.00) dollars for the pur- 
pose of building a school building in that part of Andover known 

25 



as Shawsheen Village and of purchasing furnishings and original 
equipment for said building, and that for the purpose of raising 
said amount the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Select- 
men be and he hereby is authorized and directed to prepare, 
issue and sell under authority of Chapter 272, Massachusetts 
Acts of 1923, bonds or notes of the town in the aggregate principal 
amount of two hundred thirty thousand ($230,000.00) dollars 
outside the debt limit but otherwise subject to Chapter 44 of the 
General Laws, payable in such annual payments and at such rate 
of interest not exceeding five per cent per annum payable semi- 
annually as the Treasurer and the Board of Selectmen may deem 
expedient, bearing on face the words "Andover School Loan, 
Act of 1923," signed by the Treasurer and countersigned by the 
Selectmen. The vote was unanimous, 116 voting in the affirma- 
tive and none in the negative. 

Took up Article 2. 

Voted, at 9.19 p.m., That the School Committee be appointed 
and authorized to procure plans and specifications, obtain bids, 
let contracts, and approve bills for building, purchasing the 
furnishings, and equipping the new schoolhouse mentioned in 
Article One. 

Took up Article 3. 

Voted, at 9.21 p.m., To authorize the Selectmen to take in fee 
by eminent domain for school purposes, and award damages 
therefor, the land situated on Magnolia Avenue in Andover, and 
being lot numbered six (6) as shown on plan of land known as 
"Oakhurst Knolls," recorded in Essex North District Registry 
of Deeds, book 238, page 600, said lot being bounded northerly 
by lot numbered 7, as shown on said plan, 80 feet; Easterly by 
Magnolia Avenue, as shown on said plan, 50 feet; Southerly by 
lot numbered 5, as shown on said plan, 80 feet; Westerly 50 feet 
as shown on said plan. Containing 4000 square feet of land; and 
to appropriate a sum hot exceeding seven hundred and fifty 
($750.) dollars therefor, the same to be raised by taxation. 

Took up Article 4. 

Voted, at 9.22 p.m., That article be withdrawn. 

26 



Took up Article 5. 

Voted, at 9.23 p.m., That article be withdrawn. 

Took up Article 6. 

Voted, at 9.30 p.m., Not to accept as a Town Way, said 
street. 

Took up Article 7. 

Voted, at 10.04 p.m., To appropriate a sum not exceeding 
$2500. for the purpose of lowering the bed of Roger's Brook from 
a point near center of the Public Park, to the opening of culvert 
at east side of Bartlet Street and installing necessary pipes and 
retaining walls, and such other work in the deepening and widen- 
ing of Roger's Brook as may be found necessary, said work to be 
done under the supervision of the Board of Public Works, in 
cooperation with the abutting owners. 

Took up Article 8. 

Voted, at 10.14 p.m., That the question of the collection and 
disposal of garbage and ashes be referred to the Board of Health 
and Board of Public Works, as a joint committee, to report at the 
next annual town meeting. 

Took up Article 9. 

Voted, at 10.15 p.m., That the meeting be dissolved. 

The foregoing is a true copy of the warrant and of the Officers' 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings of the meet- 
ing. 

Attest: 

GEORGE A. HIGGINS, 

Town Clerk 



27 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, SEPTEMBER 17, 1923 
WARRANT 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ss. : To either of the Constables of the Town of An- 
dover, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to 
vote in town affairs to meet and assemble at the Town House in 
said Andover, on Monday, the seventeenth day of September, 

1923, at 8 o'clock p.m., to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To see if the town will vote to appropriate the 
sum of $30,000. as its part of the reconstruction of Haverhill 
Street in Shawsheen Village from Main Street easterly about 
1700 feet, it being understood that the balance of the cost will be 
borne by the State and County; also to authorize the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow the 
said sum of $30,000. the same to be paid from the tax levy of 

1924, on petition and recommendation of the Board of Public 
Works. 

Article 2. — To act on any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof, seven days at least before the time 
of said meeting as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this Sixth day of September, A.D. 1923. 

FRANK H. HARDY 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Selectmen of Andover 

28 



Andover, Mass., September 17, 1923 
Essex, ss. 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabi- 
tants of said town to meet at the time and place and for the pur- 
poses stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attested copy 
of the same on the Town House, on each schoolhouse and in no 
less than five other public places, where bills and notices are 
usually posted, and by publication in the Andover Townsman. 
Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

FRANK M. SMITH, 

Constable 

At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to -vote in town affairs convened in the Town House in 
said Andover, on Monday, the seventeenth day of September, 
1923, at 8 o'clock in the evening, agreeably to the requirements of 
the foregoing warrant, Moderator Alfred L. Ripley presided and 
read the warrant. 

Took up Article 1 . 

Voted, at 8.20 p.m., That the town appropriate the sum of 
$30,000. as its part of the reconstruction of Haverhill Street in 
Shawsheen Village from Main Street easterly about 1700 feet, it 
being understood that the balance of the cost will be borne by the 
State and County; also that the Town Treasurer, with the ap- 
proval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow the 
said sum of $30,000. the same to be paid from the tax levy of 1924. 

Took up Article 2. 

Voted, at 8.22 p m., That the Cunningham property on 
Whittier Court, adjoining the Plays tead, and purchased by the 
town in March, 1923, be made a part of the said Playstead and 
turned over to the Park Commissioners. 

Voted, at 8.30 p.m., That the meeting be dissolved. 

The foregoing is a true copy of the warrant and of the Officers' 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

Attest: 

GEORGE A. HIGGINS, 

Town Clerk 

29 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



October 9, 1923 
To the Board of Selectmen, 

Mr. Frank H. Hardy, Chairman, 
Andover, Massachusetts. 

Gentlemen: 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the accounts of 
the town of Andover for the period from January 1, 1922 to July 
24, 1923, made in accordance with the provisions of Section 40, 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws. This report is in the form of a 
report made to me by Mr. Edward H. Fen ton, Chief Examiner of 
this Division, who was placed in charge of the work. 
Very truly yours, 

Theodore N. Waddell, 

Director of Accounts 



Mr. Theodore N. Waddell, 

Director of Accounts, 

Department of Corporations and Taxation, 
State House, Boston. 
Sir: 

As directed by you, I have made an audit of the books and 
accounts of the town of Andover for the period from January 1, 
1922 to July 24, 1923, and submit the following report thereon: 

The financial transactions of the town as recorded on the books 
of the several departments receiving or disbursing money for the 
town, or committing bills for collection, were examined for the 
period covered by the audit. 

The accounts of the selectmen were examined and checked. 
The records of orders drawn for the payment of town funds were 
checked with the appropriation accounts, and several of the 

30 



accounts were found to be overdrawn, this being in violation of 
Section 31, Chapter 44, General Laws, which provides that: 

No department of any city or town, except Boston, shall 
incur liability in excess of the appropriation made for the 
use of such department, except in cases of extreme emergency 
involving the health or safety of persons or property, and 
then only by a vote in a city of two-thirds of the members 
of the city council, and in a town by a vote of two- thirds of 
the selectmen. 

Apparently the reason for some of the overdrafts is the prac- 
tice of making appropriations of smaller amounts than are re- 
quired for the expenses of departments and depending upon the 
receipts of these departments to make up the necessary amounts, 
thereby leaving indefinite sums to be used by the departments. 
In this connection attention is called to Section 53, Chapter 44, 
General Laws, which provides that: 

All moneys received by any town officer or department, 
except as otherwise provided by special acts and except 
fees provided for by statute, shall be paid by such officer or 
department Upon their receipt into the town treasury. Any 
sums so paid into the town treasury shall not later be used 
by such officer or department without a specific appropria- 
tion thereof. 

I would therefore recommend that, in future, all appropriations 
be made for the full amount to be expended by each depart- 
ment, and that the receipts be estimated by the assessors in 
fixing the tax rate. This method, while a change from the past, 
will not cause any increase in the amount to be raised by taxation 
and will enable the department officials to plan their work better, 
as they will know early in the year the amounts they will have at 
their disposal. 

I would also recommend a small appropriation for a reserve 
fund, as provided for by Section 6, Chapter 40, General Laws. 

The custom of some departments of keeping a bank account 
and making payments to the treasurer perhaps two or three times 
a year of money which they have collected is open to censure. 
This practice is contrary to the provisions of Section 53, Chapter 

31 



44, General Laws, previously quoted. I would therefore recom- 
mend that the board of public works, the town clerk, and the 
cemetery, library, and tax collector's departments comply with 
this provision of the statute. It has also been customary for the 
library department to pay its own bills out of a banking account 
kept by the treasurer of the library. Attention is called in this 
connection to Section 35, Chapter 41 of the General Laws, which 
provides that : 

The town treasurer shall give bond for the faithful per- 
formance of his duties in a sum and with sureties approved 
by the selectmen, shall receive and take charge of all money 
belonging to the town, and pay over and account for the 
same according to the order of the town or of its authorized 
officers. No other person shall pay any bill of any depart- 
ment. He shall have the authority given to an auditor by 
section fifty-one, and shall annually render a true account 
of all his receipts and disbursements and a report of his 
official acts. 

And to Section 52, Chapter 41, General Laws, which requires 
that: 

. . . The selectmen shall approve the payment of all bills 
or payrolls of all departments before they are paid by the 
treasurer, and may disallow and refuse to approve for pay- 
ment, in whole or in part, any claim as fraudulent, unlawful 
or excessive. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were examined 
and checked in detail. The cash book was footed, and the 
recorded receipts were verified by a comparison with the records 
in the departments collecting moneys for the town or com- 
mitting bills for collection. The records of payments were 
checked with the selectmen's orders authorizing the treasurer to 
disburse town funds and with the records of amounts falling due 
on account of debt and interest and State and county taxes. 
The cash on hand July 24, 1923, was verified by an actual count 
and the bank balance was reconciled with the bank statement of 
July 24, 1923. 

The trust funds in the custody of the town treasurer were 

32 



examined and verified by comparing them with the savings 
bank books on file. 

The accounts of the tax collector covering the levies of the 
years 1921 and 1922 were examined and found to be in an un- 
satisfactory condition. It was found that the assessors of the 
town had not presented the collector with a tax list covering the 
warrants for those years as provided by Sections 53 and 54, 
Chapter 59 of the General Laws, which read as follows: 

Section 53. The assessors shall, within a reasonable 
time, commit the tax list with their warrant to the collector 
of taxes, and if there is a fire, water, light or improvement 
district in the town, they shall commit to him a separate 
list and warrant for the district taxes. If no collector has 
been chosen, they shall commit such list with their war- 
rants, to a constable; or, if there is no constable, to the 
sheriff or his deputy; but the assessors of a town shall not 
commit a tax list to the collector until the bonds of such 
collector and of the town treasurer have been given and 
approved as required by law. 

Section 54. The tax list committed to the collector shall 
be, in substance, as follows : 



Names and Residences No. of Poll Tax on Tax on Time 

(Give street and No. Polls Tax Real Personal Total when 

of residence) Estate Property paid 

Non-Resident 

Names Residences, if known Tax 



As the collector had no tax list, he has kept a card ledger for the 
years 1921 and 1922; said cards having been written up by him 
from the assessors' valuation book. In order to obtain a proof of 
the taxes, it was necessary for us to make a list of these cards, 
showing the original assessment against each taxpayer and the 
financial transactions to July 24, 1923. As several of the cards 
were missing, it was impossible to make an absolute proof of the 
condition of the tax levies. 

33 



The collector's cash book was footed and the recorded col- 
lections were verified by a comparison with the treasurer's cash 
book. The abatements were checked with the records of abate- 
ments granted by the assessors and the outstanding accounts 
were reconciled as accurately as possible under the existing 
conditions. 

The outstanding accounts were further verified by mailing 
notices to a number of persons whose names appeared on the 
cards as owing money to the town, and the replies received to 
date are in accord with the records. 

I would recommend that, in future, the collector, in making 
payments to the treasurer, show separately the amounts re- 
ceived from taxes, moth assessments, and interest, and that the 
treasurer show these items separately on his cash book. 

The books and accounts kept by the Board of Public Works 
were examined. It was noted that the bills for water rates and 
water connections are not added in total when sent out, and that 
no controlling account is kept of the water register, which is 
necessary in order to prove the outstanding accounts. The 
water register was examined and the outstanding accounts on 
July 24, 1923, were listed. 

The Board of Public Works collects its own bills for water 
rates and water connections, and the town treasurer collects all 
other bills sent out by the department. 

The cash book showing the collections was examined and the 
collections proved by a comparison with the treasurer's cash 
book, together with the cash on hand July 24, 1923, not yet paid 
to the treasurer. The cash on hand was verified by an actual 
count and the balance in the bank proved by the bank statement 
of even date. 

The sewer and sidewalk assessments were examined and 
verified and the outstanding accounts listed. The system of 
accounting in this department could be simplified, and its many 
ledgers reduced to one. 

All appropriations made for the department, whether from 
revenue or loans, should be entered as separate accounts in the 
ledger, and all bills and pay rolls should be analyzed and charged 
against the correct appropriation. 

I would recommend that, in future, the department keep a 

34 



controlling account of bills sent out for collection, debiting said 
account with the total of all such bills and crediting said account 
with all cash collections and abatements on account of same. 
The balance of this account should at all times show the out- 
standing bills, and can be proved by the uncollected accounts as 
shown in the water register. 

The town owns library trust funds which are in the custody of 
the trustees of the public library, and a fuel fund which is in the 
custody of the trustees of the Cornell Fuel Fund. The securities 
comprising these funds were examined and listed, the cash trans- 
actions during the period covered by the audit being checked and 
verified, and the income being figured and proved. The records 
of the cash transactions on account of the Cornell Fuel Fund were 
not available for the year 1922, as they had been destroyed. The 
records for the year 1923 were examined and verified and the 
cash balance on hand August 15, 1923, was verified by the bank 
statement. 

There are four trust funds in the custody of the trustees of the 
Punchard Free School, which are as follows: Punchard Free 
School Fund, Barnard Fund, Draper Fund, and Goldsmith Fund. 
The Punchard Free School Fund and the Barnard Fund were 
given by deed of gift to the trustees, to be administered by them, 
the income of said funds to be expended for the benefit of the 
High School. The Draper Fund was given to the town December 
12, 1904, the income from this fund and also from the Goldsmith 
Fund to be used for the purchasing of prizes for scholarship. The 
securities comprising these funds were examined and listed 
August 13, 1923. The cash transactions were verified and the 
income figured and proved. 

The surety bonds of the town treasurer, tax collector, and 
treasurer of the sinking funds for the faithful performance of their 
duties were examined, the collector's and the sinking fund treas- 
urer's bonds being found to be in proper form. The town treas- 
urer's bond, however, is in the form of a continuation bond and 
does not, in my opinion, give the town the protection to which 
it is entitled. I would therefore recommend that the treasurer 
have a bond for each year, as is required of the collector of taxes. 
The town clerk is not bonded as required by Section 13, 
Chapter 41, General Laws, which is as follows: 

35 



Every town clerk shall, within ten days after his qual- 
ification, give bond to the town for the faithful performance 
of his duties, in such sum and with such sureties as the se- 
lectmen may approve. If he does not give bond within the 
time prescribed, the selectmen may declare the office vacant 
and fill the vacancy in the manner prescribed in the follow- 
ing section. 

Appended to this report are tables showing a reconciliation of 
the treasurer's cash, summaries of the tax and assessment ac- 
counts and of the trust funds in the custody of the town treas- 
urer, the trustees of the library, the Punchard Free School Fund 
and the Cornell Fuel Fund, together with a statement of the 
cash transactions of the library. There is also appended a table 
showing a reconciliation of the cash balance in the possession of 
the water department July 24, 1923, a table giving the condition 
of the water loan and sewer loan sinking funds, and a balance 
sheet reflecting the financial condition of the town on July 24, 
1923. 

While engaged in making the audit, I received the hearty co- 
operation of the several town officials, and on behalf of my 
assistants and for myself I wish to express my appreciation for 
the co-operation received and the assistance rendered. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD H. FENTON, 

Chief Examiner 



36 



FINANCIAL REPORT 



SCHOOLS 



GENERAL EXPENSES 
Salaries : 

Superintendent $3800 . 00 

Attendance Officer 101 . 40 

Clerk 838.00 



Office and Miscellaneous 113.99 



$4739.40 
113.99 



$ 4853.39 



EXPENSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Supervisors : 
Salaries 



Teachers : 
High 
Elementary 

Textbooks: 
High 
Elementary 

Supplies : 
High 
Elementary 



Amount carried forward 



5742.11 5742.11 



16841.46 




49922.15 






66763.61 


395.16 




836.03 






1231.19 


1425.18 


1038.38 






2463.56 






$81053.86 



37 



A mount brought forward 

EXPENSES OF OPERATION 



$81053.86 



Janitors 

Fuel 

Miscellaneous 



$6711.57 

9879.56 

826.47 



17417.60 



Repairs 



MAINTENANCE 



3754.86 3754.86 



Health 
Transportation 



Tuition 
Sundries 



AUXILIARY AGENCIES 



MISCELLANEOUS 



1412.35 
5604.60 



666.45 
1969.18 



7016.95 



2635.63 



SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND 
EXPENDITURES 



Appropriation 
Total Expenditures 

Balance 



$111883.00 
111878.90 

4.10 



38 



TOWN OFFICERS 



Appropriation, March, 1923 $ 10400.00 

Frank H. Hardy, Chairman, Selectman, 

Assessor and Overseer $750 . 00 
Walter S. Donald, Selectman, Assessor 

and Overseer 150.00 
Charles Bowman, Selectman, Assessor 

and Overseer 800.00 
Andrew McTernen, Selectman, Assessor 

and Overseer 800.00 
George A. Higgins, Town Clerk and 

Clerk of Selectmen 1283 . 30 

George A. Higgins, Town Treasurer 1450 . 00 

William B. Cheever, Tax Collector 1800.00 

Edith P. Sellars, Clerk and Stenographer 1294.00 

Joseph I. Pitman, Building Inspector 499.92 

Daniel J. Murphy, Town Counsel 650.00 

Walter H. Coleman, Auditor 125 . 00 

John S. Robertson, Auditor 125 . 00 

Harry Sellars, Auditor 100 . 00 

Smart & Flagg, Surety Bonds 180. 00 
Division of Accounts, certification of notes 36.00 

Alfred L. Ripley, Moderator 20.00 

Charles F. Emerson, auto hire 35.00 

Charles F. Emerson, Sealer 62.50 

W. J. Morrissey, auto hire 17.50 

Elmer F. Conkey, team hire, Assessor 16.00 

C. Madeleine Hewes, clerical work 45.30 
Lilla D. Stott, probate and real estate 

transfers 88.40 



Amount carried forward 



$10327.92 



3 ( > 



A mount brought forward $ 1 03 2 7 . 92 

Andover National Bank, safety deposit box 5 . 00 

Sampson Murdock Co., directory 5.00 

Banker and Tradesman, subscription 7 . 00 

Board of Assessors, expenses 31 . 00 

Board of Selectmen, expenses 20.72 

American Railway Express Co. .37 



Total expenditure $ 10397.01 

Balance 2.99 



$10400.00 $10400.00 



40 



TOWN HOUSE 



Appropriation 




George W. Mears, Janitor 


$210.00 


William C. Brown, Janitor 


845.05 


Police Duty 


67.00 


Lighting 


351.97 


Fuel 


950.94 


Equipment and repairs 


450.52 


Supplies 


222.31 


Labor, removing rubbish 


32.00 


Total 


$3129.79 


Transferred from Miscellaneous 





$3000.00 



129.79 



$3129.79 $3129.79 



41 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation 


$24000.00 


Salaries, Engineers 


$1275.00 


Wages, permanent men 


11315.00 


Wages, call men 


3023.50 


Wages, fire alarm 


106.92 


Fire Alarm 


783.51 


Fuel 


959.64 


Light 


240.82 


Maintenance building and furnishings 


609 . 13 


Equipment and repairs 


2782.95 


Horses, care of same 


993.52 


Miscellaneous 


371.62 


Telephone 


96.90 


Labor 


129.00 


Janitor, Ballardvale 


100.00 


New Hose, 1200 feet 


1038.00 


Total expenditures 


$23825.51 


Balance 


174.49 



$24000.00 $24000.00 



42 



FIRE TRUCK 



Appropriation 

Stutz Fire Engine Co. 
Balance 



$10000.00 



$9000.00 
1000.00 



$10000.00 $10000.00 



BRUSH FIRES 




Appropriation 

Pay Rolls 

George H. Hadley & Co., C. soda 

C. R. Hoffman, lunches 

J. F. McDonough, team hire 

Terry Press, printing 


$952.50 

25.09 

3.85 

7.50 

10.50 


Total 
Balance 


$999.44 
.56 



$1000.00 



$1000.00 $1000.00 



43 



ELECTION AND REGISTRATION 



Appropiiation 




Precinct Officers 




Piecinct One 


$107.50 


Precinct Two 


52.00 


Precinct Three 


55.50 


Precinct Four 


51.00 


Police Duty 


15.00 


Printing 


63.60 


Registrars of Voters 


75.00 


C. R. Hoffman, lunches 


7.75 


American Woolen Co., ballot boxes 


27.80 


Total 


$455.15 


Balance 


144.85 



$600.00 



$600.00 $600.00 



44 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation 


$14500.00 


Special Appropriation 


700.00 


Frank M. Smith, Chief 


$1872.00 


Pay Roll, Patrolmen 


9248.35 


Wages, Special Police 


868.24 


A. A. Roesch, truck 


759.82 


Maintenance, truck and motorcycle 


486.40 


Miscellaneous 


227.93 


Equipment and repairs 


299.26 


Telephone 


137.95 


Auto hire 


103.50 


Light 


64.95 


George B. Carmichael, Dog Officer 


65.00 


Auto List Pub. Co., subscription 


50.00 


Total 


$14183.40 


Balance 


1016.60 



$15200.00 $15200.00 



45 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Appropriation 

Lotta Johnson, Nurse, salary 

Lotta Johnson, use of car 

Lotta Johnson, Inspector of Slaughtering 

Dr. Charles E. Abbott, salary 

Dr. Charles E. Abbott, fumigation 

F. H. Stacey, salary 

F. H. Stacey, fumigation and supplies 

B. T. Haynes, salary 

B. T. Haynes, fumigation 

Ray S. Youmans, Inspector of Animals 
Joseph P. Nolan, Plumbing Inspector 
John S. Buchan, Plumbing Inspector 
Essex Sanatorium, board of patients 
Reading State Sanatorium, board of 

patient 
Printing 

C. A. Hill, plate 

William Burke, burying animals 
John Fraize, burying animals 
Modern Hospital Pub. Co., subscription 
C. L. Wilson, transportation 
C. J. Francis, supplies 





$3600.00 


$1500.00 


200 


.00 


200.00 


75 


.00 


36 


.00 


50.00 


241 


.75 


50 


.00 


11 


.28 


350 


.00 


234 


.00 


30 


.00 


550 


.78 


128, 


00 


19 


50 


3. 


85 


12. 


00 


8. 


00 


3. 


00 


1. 


50 


1. 


25 



Total 

Transferred from Miscellaneous 



$3705.91 



105.91 



$3705.91 $3705.91 



46 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Appropriation 

The Andover Press, printing, advertis- 
ing and supplies 
Post Office, envelopes 
Hobbs & Warren, blanks 
Burroughs Adding Machine Co., services 
F. & E. Check Writer Sales Co., machine 
A. L. Cole Co., desk pads 
Munson Supply Co., speed keys 
P. B. Murphy, blanks 
Terry Press, printing 
Henry M. Meek Pub. Co., directory 
Charles N. Smart, machine 
A. W. Brownell Corp., tax tables 
The Carter's Ink Co., ink 
H. M. Meserve & Co., supplies 
T. H. Von Kamecke, folders 
Blackbird Pen Co., pens 
Bank & Office Equip. Co., steel case 
The Birmingham Pen Co., pens 
Becker & Co., paper 
Avon Envelope Co., envelopes 
James R. Barrie, stamp pads 
The Chicataubut Press, blanks 
Wright & Potter Printing Co., tax blanks 
Cheney Paper Co., paper 

Total 
Balance 



$1601.43 


145 


.42 


17 


.35 


16 


.68 


35 


.00 


16 


.20 


6 


.50 


16 


.00 


5 


.75 


5 


.00 


5 


.75 


6 


.10 


4 


.50 


10 


.36 


4 


.50 


3, 


.75 


11, 


.00 


7. 


,25 


6. 


05 


4.65 


3. 


50 


2. 


00 


7. 


00 


4. 


12 


$1945.86 


54. 


14 



$2000.00 



$2000.00 $2000.00 



47 



TREE WARDEN AND MOTH DEPARTMENT 





MOTH WORK 




Appropriation 




$15000.00 


Edward H. Berry, Superintendent 


$773.25 


Edward H. Berry, expenses 


14.40 


Pay Rolls 




2866.23 


Fitz Henry Guptill Co. 


, stock and rebuild 




ing sprayer 




1864.04 


Equipment 




567.68 


Lead and creosote 




1015.40 


Team hire 




267.00 


Rent 




60.00 


Miscellaneous 




57.42 


Total 


$7485.42 




TREE WARDEN 




Edward H. Berry, tree warden 


812.50 


Pay rolls 




4357.19 


Jerry Golden, labor 




396.00 


Equipment and repairs 




405 . 99 


Trees 




113.25 


Telephone 




32.74 


Sulphur and creosote 




117.00 


Truck 




606.95 


Supplies 




91.98 


Rent 




50.00 


Freight 


- 


43.54 


Total 


$7027.14 


Total expenditure 


$14512.56 


Balance 


' 


487.44 



$15000.00 $15000.00 



48 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



Appropriation, March 1923 


$5200.00 


F. A. Swanton, Supt. 


$1475.00 


Edith P. Sellars, Clerk 


110.00 


Pay Rolls 


3063.65 


Elmer F. Conkey, moving building 


102.50 


Equipment and repairs 


92.15 


Printing and stationery 


26.00 


Miscellaneous 


304.97 


Water 


8.24 


Total expenditures 


5182.51 


Balance 


17.49 



$5200.00 $5200.00 



49 



INSURANCE 



Appropriation, Fire 
Appropriation, Workmen's 

Merrimack Mut. Fire Ins. 
Smart & Flagg, Agents 


Compensation 
Co. 


$5082.41 
45.00 


$3500.00 
2500.00 


Total 
Balance 


$5127.41 

872.59 






$6000.00 

$100.00 
17.60 


$6000.00 


HAY SC4LES 




Appropriation 

William C. Brown, weigher 
Repairs on scales 




$125.00 


Total 
Balance 


$117.60 
7.40 






$125.00 


$125.00 



STREET LIGHTING 



Appropriation 

Lawrence Gas Co. 
Balance 


$10000.00 

$9686.38 
313.62 



$10000.00 $10000.00 



50 



SEWER SINKING FUND 



Appropriation $ 1 000 . 00 

Arthur T. Boutwell, Treas. Sinking Fund $1000 . 00 



$1000.00 $1000.00 



WATER SINKING FUND 



Appropriation $750 . 00 

Arthur T. Boutwell, Treas. Sinking Fund $750 . 00 



$750.00 $750.00 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



Appropriation $4000 . 00 

F. S. Boutwell, Treas. $4000 . 00 



$4000.00 $4000.00 



51 



STATE TAXES 



Andover's proportion of State Tax 

Andover's proportion of Highway Tax 

Bank Tax 

Civilian War Poll Tax 

Soldier's Exemption 

Corporation Tax 

Treasurer of Commonwealth 



$38497.3' 



$38497.37 $38407.37 



$24000 


.00 


4353 


.00 


2257 


.42 


7737 


.00 


2 


.78 


147 


17 



COUNTY TAX 



Andover's proportion of County Tax 
Walter P. Babb. County Treasurer 



$22708.20 



$22708.20 



DOG TAX 



$22708.20 $22708.20 



Received from County Treasurer 
F S. Boutwell. Treas. Memorial Hall 



$502.82 



$502.82 



$502.82 $502.82 



52 



MEMORIAL DAY 



Appropriation $550 . 00 

Jesse S. Billington, Quartermaster $550 . 00 



$550.00 $550.00 



POST 99, G. A. R. 



Appropriation $100 . 00 

Jesse S. Billington, Quartermaster $100 . 00 



$100.00 $100.00 



RETIREMENT OF VETERANS 



Appropriation 
Paid to Veteran 




$300.00 


$300.00 




$300.00 
$75.00 


$300.00 


Appropriation 
Olof Benson, Keeper 


PUBLIC DUMP 


$75.00 



$75.00 $75.00 

53 



INTEREST 




Appropriation 


$25400.00 


Water Coupons 


$4862.50 


Sewer Coupons 


7667.50 


High School Coupons 


3000.00 


Shawsheen Bridge Coupons 


475.00 


Main Street Coupons 


4500.00 


Temporary Loans 


6930.20 


Total 


$27435.20 


Overdraft 


2035 . 20 



$27435.20 $27435.20 



ANDOVER POST NO. 8, AMERICAN LEGION 



Appropriation 

Paid American Legion 
Balance 



$900.00 



$827.94 
72.06 



$900.00 $900.00 



54 



WAR MEMORIAL COMMITTEE 



Appropriation 

John Nolen, plans 

O'Connell Ingalls Advt. Agency 

The Andover Press, printing 


$1200.00 

$700.00 
15.36 
40.50 


Total 
Balance 


755.86 
444.14 




$1200.00 $1200.00 


NOTES GIVEN 




Andover National Bank, Note 40 Rate 
Andover National Bank, Notes 41-50, " 
Andover National Bank, Notes 51-56, " 
Andover National Bank, Note 57 


$4.00 $10000.00 
4.18 150000.00 
4.39 100000.00 
4.27 30000.00 




$290000.00 


NOTES PAID 




Andover National Bank $260000.00 
Note 57, Due April 24, 1924 30000.00 

$290000 . 00 



55 



xMISCELLANEOUS 



Appropriation 


$1200.00 


Telephone 


$22.95 


Herbert Clarke, repairs 


38.25 


C. F. Emerson, sealer 


83.33 


W. and L. E. Gurley, sealer's supplies 


179.66 


A. P. Wright, field driver 


25.00 


Merrimack Mutual Fire Insurance Co., 




Treasurer's Bond 


20.00 


C. S. Buchan, shades 


10.00 


Fred N. Abbott, legal service 


21.00 


County of Essex, petition 


3.00 


H. M. Meserve & Co., supplies 


19.87 


J. H. Playdon, decorating 


10.00 


G. A. Higgins, sundry expenses 


43.50 


John Colbath, labor 


6.00 


John A. Riley, labor 


20.90 


F. H. Hardy, recording deed 


2.34 


American Railway Express Co. 


1.49 


Boston and Lawrence Despatch 


.38 


M.J. Mahoney, return of deaths 


2.50 


Joseph H. Couture, return of deaths 


1.00 


E. M. Lundgren, return of deaths 


18.25 


E. L. Bennett, return of deaths 


1.50 


Dr. J. J. Daly, return of births 


4.50 


Dr. W. D. Walker, return of births 


11.50 


Dr. P. J. Look, return of births 


11.75 


Dr. J. B. Masse, return of births 


1.25 


Dr. E. D. Lane, return of births 


6.00 


Dr. Philip W. Blake, return of births 


1.00 


Dr. R. M. Birmingham, return of births 


.75 



A mount carried forward 



$567.67 



56 



A mount brought forward 

Dr. G. S. Allen, return of births 
Dr. F. A. Cregg, return of births 

Total expenditure 

Transferred to Town House 
Transferred to Board of Health 
Transferred to Soldiers' Relief 
Transferred to Almshouse 
Balance 



$567.67 $1200.00 

1.00 

1.25 



$569.92 

129.79 
105.91 
152.35 
200.00 
42.03 



$1200.00 $1200.00 



REDEMPTION OF BONDS 



Appropriation 


$45500.00 


From Water Sinking Fund 


10000.00 


Six High School Bonds 


$6000.00 


Seven Sewer Bonds 


7000.00 


Twenty Main Street Bonds 


20000.00 


Shawsheen Bridge Bonds 


2500.00 


Twenty Water Bonds 


20000.00 



$55500.00 $55500.00 



57 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



The general efficiency and appearance of our Almshouse plant 
has been improved during the current year. A barn has been 
added and the grounds around the Almshouse have been loamed 
and finish graded. 

Many of the old dead trees are now being removed in an effort 
to further improve the general appearance of the house and 
grounds. Minor alterations and improvements have been made 
in the plant; all within the appropriation granted at our last 
Town meeting. 

Outside relief and Mothers' Aid will, this year, call for slightly 
increased appropriations. Every effort has been made to hold 
the expenditure of these divisions of our Poor Department down 
to the lowest sum possible, but all needy cases must be cared for 
and an increased appropriation is unavoidable. 

The Board calls attention to the efficient mannei in which the 
Almshouse is being cared for by our matron. A kindness and 
firmness is evident that speaks well both for the comfort of the 
inmates and for a careful consideration and expenditure of the 
public funds. It is pleasing to note that Francis Bardwell, 
State Inspector of Almshouses, has stated in his 1923 report 
that Andover's Almshouse is a model house and a credit to 
both Town and State in the matter of equipment, arrangement, 
and management. 

FRANK H. HARDY 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Overseers of the Poor 



58 



ALMSHOUSE EXPENSES 



Appropriation 




$6600.00 


Mrs. F. A. Swanton, matron 


$900.00 




Wages, employees 


1188.63 




Groceries and provisions 


2563.29 




Fuel 


1033.20 




Light 


356.71 




Clothing 


109.74 




Equipment and repairs 


301.85 




Maintenance buildings and grounds 


88.85 




Medicine and medical aid 


46.85 




Sundries 


73.72 




Telephone 


17.20 




Water 


80.00 




Funeral expenses 


50.00 




F. A. Swanton, board of horse 


200.75 




C. F. Emerson, moving 


146.75 




Miscellaneous 


14.40 




Total expenditure 


$7171.94 




Transferred from Miscellaneous 




200.00 


Transferred from Special Almshouse 




371.94 



$7171.94 $7171.94 



59 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF 



Appropriation 



Total expenditure 

Transferred from Miscellaneous 



$1652.35 



$1500.00 



152.35 



$1652.35 $1652.35 





STATE AID 




ropriation 






Total expenditure 
Balance 




$386.00 
214.00 



$600.00 



$600.00 $600.00 



OUTSIDE RELIEF 



Appropriation 

Paid out of Almshouse 
Paid other cities and towns 
Paid State 
Paid account of State 


$3096.73 
615.90 
392.57 
845.75 


$5000.00 


Total expenditure 
Balance 


.4950.95 
49.05 





$5000.00 $5000.00 



60 



NEW ALMSHOUSE 



Appropriation, March 1923 




$6500.00 


Lawrence Gas Co. 




$223.80 


Perley F. Gilbert, commission 




162.54 


John F. McDonough, grading 




1359.05 


E. W. Pitman Co. 




1826.34 


W. H. Welch Co., plumbing 




381.72 


Marion L. Wood, barn 




300.00 


Keene Screen Co., screens 




300.00 


Joseph J. McCarthy, foundation 




510.00 


Wilson Building Moving Co., 


moving 




barn 




500.00 


American Woolen Co., labor on barn 


314.10 


The Higgin Mfg. Co., window 


screens 




and shades 




110.00 


Elmer F. Conkey, grading 




45.00 


Underwriter's Equipment Co., 


Fire ex- 




tinguishers 




37.50 


Dana W. Clark, engineering 




18.00 


Boston and Lawrence Despatch 




.38 


Total expenditure 


$6088.43 


Transferred to Almshouse 




371.94 


Balance 




39.63 



$6500.00 $6500.00 



61 



AIDING MOTHERS WITH DEPENDENT CHILDREN 

Appropriation $2500 . 00 



Town cases 

Paid other towns 

Paid account other towns 

Total expenditure 
Received from State 
Received from towns 



Net expenditure 
Overdrawn 



$1532.90 
1291.13 



$3200.45 

663.82 

1460.69 

5324.96 



2824.03 



2500.93 



.93 



$2500.93 $2500.93 



STATISTICS OF ANDOVER ALMSHOUSE 



Number of inmates January 1, 1923 
Number admitted during year 
Number of deaths 
Number discharged 
Number of inmates January 1, 1924 
Number between 20 and 30 years of age 
Number between 60 and 70 years of age 
Number between 70 and 80 years of age 
Number between 80 and 90 years of age 



10 
2 

2 
1 
9 
1 
4 
2 
2 



62 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



We herewith submit our annual report. 



Number of males assessed 


2579 




Personal estate 


$3, 660,020. 00 




Real estate 


11,164,450.00 


$14,824,470.00 






Poll tax 


12,895.00 




Tax on personal estate 


97,725.12 




Tax on real estate 


298,092.31 


$408,712.43 






Moth assessments 




2,143.27 


Abatements 
Personal 


$445.71 




Real estate 


246.18 


691.89 


Rate of taxation per $1000 


$26.70 


Number of 






Horses assessed 




441 


Cows assessed 




916 


Neat cattle 




54 


Swine 




101 


Fowl 




20493 


Dwellings 




2011 


Acres of land 




17804 



FRANK H. HARDY, Chairman 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Board of A ssessors 



63 



REPORT OF TREE WARDEN 



This has been a very successful year for the Tree Department. 

We have cut and burned approximately forty miles of roadside 
brush, removed fifty large trees and planted seventy-five new 
shade trees in different sections of the town. We also pruned 
shade trees on twenty streets. There is as much needed to be 
done in 1924. In order to carry on the work of this Department, 
I ask that the sum of $6000.00 be appropriated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD H. BERRY 

Tree Warden 



REPORT OF MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 



I herewith submit my report of the Moth Department for 
year ending December 31, 1923. 

The moth situation in Andover looks very favorable and I 
want to thank the property owners for their earnest co-operation. 
The pests are on the decrease, still there are enough left to seed 
the town if we do not use the same precaution as in previous 
years. We have had two of our old sprayers rebuilt with new 
engines so we are well equipped for the spraying season. 

To carry on the work of this department, I ask that the sum of 
$6000.00 be appropriated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD H. BERRY 

Moth Superintendent 

64 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



REPORT OF CHIEF 

To the Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen :■ — 

I hereby submit the report of the Police Department for the 
year ending December 31, 1923. 

Whole number of arrests 208. Females 4. Males 204 

Offenses for Which Arrests Were Made 

Assault 5 

Assault with intent to rob ; 1 

Assault on wife ' , • 1 

Assault to rape 1 

Arson 1 

Breaking and entering ; 2 

Bastardy 1 

Drunk 30 

Disturbance 5 

Disposing of leased property 1 

Fishing on the Lord's Day ,6 

Fishing without license 2 

Gaming on the Lord's Day 4 

Gunning without license 1 

Insane 3 

Interfering with an officer 2 

Keeping unlicensed dog 1 

Larceny . , 8 

Loaded revolver in possession of 2 

Manslaughter 2 
Operating Motor Vehicle while under the influence of 

• liquor 2 

, 65 



Operating Motor Vehicle so as to endanger the lives and 

safety of the people 2 

Operating Motor Vehicle without license 9 

Minor Violation of Motor Vehicle Law 72 

Non-payment of Taxes 1 

Truancy 1 

Trespass 1 

Unlawful appropriation of Motor Vehicle 2 

Violation of Liquor Law 2 

Violation of Town ordinance 2 

Vagrancy 7 

Indecent exposure 1 

Malicious mischief 4 

Total 208 

DISPOSITION OF CASES 

Appealed 10 

Paid fines in Lower Court 69 

Probation 28 

On file 12 

Discharged 22 

Committed to Danvers Insane Hospital 4 

Committed to Tewksbury (State Infirmary) 6 

Committed to House of Correction 7 

Committed to State Farm 3 

Suspended sentence to House of Correction 4 

Suspended sentence to State Farm 2 

Returned to Parents 7 

Continued for sentence 22 

Held for Grand Jury 6 

Arrested for out of town officers 6 

Total 208 
MISCELLANEOUS 

Fines paid in Lower Court $1635.00 

Fines paid in Superior Court 416.60 

Value of property stolen 1800.00 

66 



Value of property recovered 1500.00 

Police Equipment 1000 . 00 

Dead bodies cared for 4 

Doors found open at night 102 

SUPERIOR COURT FINDINGS 

No Bill Found 2 

Cases Pending 4 

On Probation 2 

Paid Fines 7 

Nol prossed 5 

FRANK M. SMITH 

Chief of Police 



67 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



The trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery submit the following 
report : — 

The care of the cemetery has been carried on as usual and 
much has been accomplished according to finances. 

A large tract on the east side has been cleared and broken up. 
Over an acre has been sown down and made available for new 
lots. 

The tool house has been moved from its old location to the 
entrance of the cemetery, making it more convenient for the 
Superintendent and others. 

Over 50 small pines have been set out along the west side of 
the cemetery. This spot is very sandy and not suitable for lots. 
Numerous shrubs have been set out on both sides of the cemetery, 
especially where the old pines were. 

Favorable comment has been made by all visiting caretakers 
and undertakers of our new tomb. 

Warren L. Johnson who has served on the Board so faithfully 
resigned on account of his departure to Nova Scotia. Mr. Fred 
Swanton has been chosen to fill his place. 

The Board of Trustees ask outside of the regular appropriation, 
for $6500.00 to purchase the adjacent land which borders the 
cemetery on the east side and takes in all the land to Abbot 
Street and Porter Road. This the board feels is necessary as 
Andover is growing fast and with this new land will complete the 
cemetery for years to come. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER I. MORSE, Chairman 
DAVID R.LAWSON 
DANIEL H. POOR 
FRED A. SWANTON 
EVERETT M. LUNDGREN 
JOHN W. STARK 
FRED E. CHEEVER 

Fred E. Cheever, Clerk of the Board of Trustees. 

68 



STATISTICS OF SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 

Number of lots sold as per last report 550 

Number of lots sold in 1923 8 

Total number sold 558 

Total number of single graves sold 201 

Number of interments as per last report 1631 

Number of interments in 1923 57 

Total number of interments 1688 

FRED A. SWANTON 

Superintendent 



69 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S REPORT 



To the Board of Selectmen: — 

Gentlemen: — I hereby submit my report for the time be- 
ginning January 8, 1923, and ending December 31, 1923. 

Number of cattle inspected 1385 
Number of swine 471 
Number of sheep 22 
Number of stables 143 
Number of cattle condemned affected with tubercu- 
losis 6 
Number of stables disinfected 6 
Interstate cattle identified and released 165 
Number of dogs quarantined 20 
Number of dogs affected with rabies 30 

Respectfully submitted, 

RAY S. YOUMANS 

Inspector of Animals 



70 



REPORT OF BUILDING INSPECTOR 



To the Board of Selectmen. 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit my report of the Building 
Inspector's Department from December 31, 1922, to December 
31, 1923. 

Whole number of permits granted 204 

Dwellings 98 

Two-tenement dwellings 9 

Garages 3 1 

Additions and alterations 23 

Business blocks 1 

Stores 3 

Warehouses 4 

Apartment of twenty tenements 1 

Sheds 4 

Dairy 1 

Clubhouses 1 

Schoolhouses 1 

Coal pockets 1 

Banks 1 

Henhouses 7 

Camps 7 

Filling stations 2 

Elevators 9 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH I. PITMAN 

Building Inspects 



71 



MUNICIPAL PROPERTIES AND PUBLIC 
IMPROVEMENTS 





Land and 


Equip, and 


Total 




Buildings 


other Property 


Town Hall 


$ 62900 


$ 3000 


$ 65900 


Fire Department 


41500 


30000 


71500 


Police Department 




1000 


1000 


Schools 


293500 


10000 


303500 


Library 


42000 


10000 


52000 


Water Department 


84450 


300600 


385050 


Sewer Department 


8000 


475000 


483000 


Highway Department 


4500 


5275 


9775 


Tree Warden and Moth De- 








partment 




5000 


5000 


Almshouse 


41000 


7500 


48500 


Park Department 


30200 




30200 


Cemeteries 


16000 


500 


16500 


Weights and Measures 




350 


350 


Hay Scales 




350 


350 


Old Schoolhouse, Ballard - 








yale 


5000 




5000 


Punchard School Fund 




77000 


77000 


Memorial Hall Invest. 








Funds 




73491 


73491 


Other Unproductive Proper- 








ties 








9 acres land, Burn ham Rd. 


2500 




2500 


9 acres land, Indian Ridge 








(gravel pit) 


3000 




3000 


Totals 


S634550 


$999066 


$1633616 



12 



TOWN OF ANDOVER — JURY LIST 



Abbott, Newton S. 
Armitage, Charles H. 
Averill, George L. 
Bailey, Charles L. 
Bailey, Henry B. 
Bailey, Ralph 
Bailey, Samuel H. 
Bancroft, William A. 
Bassett, Arthur W. 
Baxter, George H. 
Barrett, Patrick J. 
Boutwell, Edward W. 
Boutwell, Everett S. 
Burns, David F. 
Cates, A. Lincoln 
Cannon, Gordon R. 
Carter, George M. 
Chase, Herbert F. 
Clark, Herbert 
Cole, Joseph F. 
Cole, Roscoe K. 
Coleman, Waltei H. 
Comeau, Arthur N. 
Coutts, William C. 
Dane, George A. 
Doyle, Thomas J. 
Disbrow, George W. 
Dunnells, George C. 
Fairweather, James D. 
Fleming, Edward, Jr. 
Flint, Edwin M. 



Carpenter 

Operative 

Farmer 

Retired 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Retired 

Clerk 

Gardener 

Ins. Collector 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Signal Operator 

Gardener 

Salesman 

Farmer 

Storekeeper 

Carpenter 

Retired 

Carpenter 

Retired 

Carpenter 

Retired 

Dresser 

Fireman 

Farmer 

Watchman 

Gardener 

Chauffeur 

Farmer 



River Rd- 

123 Haverhill St- 

Reservation St- 

Main St- 

High Plain Rd- 

Porter Rd- 

Porter Rd. 

Lowell June- 

Hidden Rd. 

43 Lowell St. 

88 Chestnut St. 

Pleasant St. 

Pleasant St. 

Chester St. 

47 Whittier St. 

54 Salem St. 

High Plain Rd. 

Summer St. 

Tewksbury St. 

Hidden Rd. 

115 Elm St. 

42 Chestnut St. 

Highland Rd. 

60 Maple Ave. 

And over St. 

Holt Rd. 

Chandler Rd. 

6 Sutherland St. 

15 Abbot St. 

54 Haverhill St. 

Pleasant St. 



73 



Flaherty, Michael J. 
Garland, George M. 
Gordon, Alexander 
Hannon, Patrick J. 
Harrington, Daniel F. 
Hill, Charles A. 
Hill, Paul 
Hill, Ira B. 
Hilton, Henry 
Holt, George A. 
Hovey, James H. 
Jaques, Robert 
Jaquith, Newton 
Keane, Mark M. 
Kendall, Frank HE. 
Lawson, George D. 
Lawson, John B. 
Lee, Harry F. 
Lynch, Joseph P. 
Mahoney, Timothy J. 
May, George M. 
Mclntyre, William D. 
Miller, George R. 
Mosher, James R. 
Morrissey, William B. 
Nason, Harry C. 
Newton, Charles M. 
Nolan, Joseph P. 
Noyes, John L. 
O'Donnell, Hugh F. 
O'Donnell, John A. 
Petrie, George B. 
Pike, Warren G. 
Pitman, Joseph I. 
Piatt, Henry W. 
Purcell, James F. 
Reilly, Bernard J. 
Remmes, Joseph T. 
Rennie, George 



Spinner 

Electrician 

Belt Maker 

Retired 

Farmer 

Electrician 

Farmer 

Night Watchman 

Operative 

Carpenter 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Electrician 

Clerk 

Carpenter 

Retired 

Machinist 

Farmer 

Switchman 

Clerk 

Painter 

Clerk 

Salesman 

Clerk 

Electrician 

Carpenter 

Poultry Business 

Plumber 

Farmer 

Moulder 

Switchman 

Janitor 

Farmer 

Carpenter 

Overseer 

Baker 

Gardener 

Electrician 

Farmer 



River St. 

Prospect Hill Rd. 

82 Poor St. 

Elm St. 

Osgood St. 

13 Chestnut St. 

Jenkins Rd. 

Lupine Rd. 

67 High St. 

8 Summer St. 

Main St. 

River St. 

Main St. 

Moraine St 

7 Chestnut St. 

35 Maple Ave. 

9 Chestnut St. 

Pleasant St. 

Tewksbury St. 

Whittier St. 

Main St. 

Andover St. 

Center St. 

21 Balmoial St. 

66 Poor St. 

Clark Rd. 

Boutwell Rd. 

7 Cuba St. 

Love joy Rd. 

Center St. 

Marland St. 

Chickering Ct. 

Laurel Lane 

17 Summer St. 

Center St. 

36 Elm St. 

79 Haverhill St. 

Missionary Lane 

Argilla Rd. 



74 



Riley, John A. 
Riley, Joseph A. 
Robinson, William C. 
Scott, David M. 
Shaw, Irving R. 
Sherry, Frank J. 
Sherry, Richard 
Stott, Joseph E. 
Stewart, James 
Taylor, Loren E. 
Todd, Henry 
Trow, Henry J. 
Valentine, Franklin S. 
Walker, Salmond C. 
Ward, George D. 
Whitman, David O. 



Retired 

Wool Sorter 

Blacksmith 

Warp Dresser 

Wool Sorter 

Pattern Maker 

Moulder 

Clerk 

Retired 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Wool Sorter 

Clerk 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Rubber Worker 



Center St, 

Center St. 

427 No. Main St. 

19 Avon St. 

High St. 

Andover St. 

Chestnut St. 

High St. 

Red Spring Rd. 

1 1 Washington Ave. 

60 Poor St. 

River St. 

20 Elm St. 

Chester St. 

Lowell St. 

9 Pine St. 



75 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR 



1920 



Amount of warrant 
Added to warrant 
Moth work 
Interest 
Collected taxes 
Collected Moth work 
Interest 



Amount of warrant 
Added to warrant 
Moth work 
Interest 
Collected taxes 
Collected Moth work 
Interest 
Abated 
Uncollected 



Amount of warrant 

Added to warrant 

Moth work 

Interest 

Collected taxes 

Collected Moth work 

Interest 

Abated 

Uncollected 



1921 



1922 





$804.09 




198.22 




1.30 




129.76 


$1002.31 




1.30 




129.76 




$1133.37 


$1133.37 




$15062.73 




66.44 




419.35 




1529.93 


$14680.60 




419.35 




1529.93 




171.64 




*276.93 




$17078.45 


$17078.45 




$46755.50 




27.97 




378.48 




1274.02 


$32164.02 




378.48 




1274.02 




325.40 




14294.05 





$48435.97 $48435.97 



^Amount now collected 



76 



1923 



Amount of warrant 

Added to warrant 

Interest 

Moth work 

Collected taxes 

Collected Moth work 

Interest 

Abated 

Uncollected 



$356658.41 

1896.57 

108.35 

1558.89 

52977.42 



$410855.70 

339.02 

108.35 

1896.57 



$413199.64 $413199.64 



SUMMARY COLLECTOR'S CASH ACCOUNT, 1923 

Amount Collected and Paid to Town Treasurer 



1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
Int. on Deposits 



Taxes 



$ 1002.31 

14680.60 

32164.02 

356658.41 



$404505.34 



Moth Work 



; 1.30 

419.35 

378.48 

1896.57 



$2695.70 



Interest 



$ 129.76 

1529.93 

1274.02 

108.35 

257.16 



$3299.22 



Total 



i 1133.37 
16629.88 
33816.52 

358663.33 
257.16 



$410500.26 



WILLIAM B. CHEEVER 

Collector of Taxes 



77 



CORNELL FUND 



Receipts 






Amount of Fund 




$5000.00 


Deposited in Savings Bank 




5000.00 


Balance from last account 


$144.75 




Savings Bank interest 


245.00 


$389.75 






Expenditures 






Expended for coal and wood 


$182.56 




Balance on hand 


207.19 


<£?GO 7C 



JOHN C. ANGUS 
CHARLES N. MARLAND 
W. DACRE WALKER 

Trustees 



78 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Board of Selectmen . 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit the report of the Andover 
Fire Department, from January 1, 1923, to January 1, 1924. 

During this time the Department has answered 160 bell and 
22 still alarms of fire. 

Have laid 8050 feet of 2^-inch hose and 3025 feet of %-inch 
hose, using 1010 gallons of chemical, and 910 feet of ladders. 

Value of buildings where fires have occurred $440,500: loss by 
fires $165,000, mostly covered by insurance. 

The Department consists of one Combination Hose and 
Chemical, one Combination Hose, Chemical and Pump, one 
Ladder Truck, one Brush Fire Truck, one two-horse Hose Wagon, 
one exercise wagon, two sleds, and four sets of double harness. 
We have 6000 feet of 2J^-inch hose in good condition. 

CHARLES F. EMERSON 

Chief Engineer 



79 



BOARD OF HEALTH NURSE 
AND AGENT 



To the Board of Health. 

There have been 213 cases of contagious diseases reported, 
classified and compared with 1922 and 1921 as follows: 





1923 


1922 


1921 


Influenza 


51 


125 





Tuberculosis 


6 


11 


10 


Incephalitis Lethargica 











Typhoid Fever 








6 


Scarlet Fever 


15 


15 


36 


Diphtheria 


8 


16 


21 


Chicken Pox 


18 


14 


25 


Whooping Cough 


46 


75 


2 


Measles 


16 


44 


358 


Mumps 


5 


7 


5 


Suppurative Conjunctivitis 








1 


Lobar Pneumonia 


15 


14 


4 


Anterio Poliomyelitis 


1 


2 


3 


German Measles 


3 


1 





Septic Sore Throat 





2 





Ophthalmia Neonatorum 


2 


1 





Gonorrhea 


5 


1 





Syphilis 


4 


1 





Rabies 


18 









213 328 471 



80 



Deaths from Contagious Diseases 



Tuberculosis 

Typhoid Fever 

Tetanus 

Measles 

Lobar Pneumonia 

Scarlet Fever 

Diphtheria 

Influenza 



1923 


1922 


1921 


3 


5 


6 








1 








2 








1 





3 


2 








1 





3 





3 









11 13 



During the year I made 1749 sanitary and sick calls. 
Miscellaneous visits as follows: 

Accident, emergency and obstetrical 21 

Erysipelas 23 

Carcinoma 4 

Diphtheria Cultures for diagnosis 3 

Diphtheria Cultures for release 53 

Dressings 40 

Prenatal and child-welfare 117 

261 

This year has differed to a certain extent as to Public Health 
work. The public seemed to have been more interested as to 
sanitation. Many complaints were made where careless people 
were the cause of unhealthy nuisances. 

The public as a whole are beginning to realize the necessity 
of clean and sanitary surroundings; that it is imperative that all 
rules and regulations be enforced if we wish to preserve a high 
standard of living and enjoy good health. Many of the com- 
plaints were due to the fact that much refuse was dumped upon 
private property, which is contrary to town rules. All refuse 
must be deposited at the Public Dump. 

It is true we have some very unsightly places which, though 
we have tried to remedy them, are in some cases only unsightly 
and not unsanitary. Where there is no danger to the health of 

81 



the public we have no laws by which to inforce the cleaning up of 
such places. 

As the public will notice we have had what one could term a 
very fine health record for the year 1923. There have been 
fewer cases of contagious diseases, owing to the fact that the 
Board of Health has insisted upon strict quarantine. It may 
seem hard for those who are unfortunate enough to have some 
communicable disease, to live up to the laws of quarantine, but 
we sincerely hope they will be farsighted enough to know it is for 
the welfare of the community in which they live, and that they 
in turn will also derive a benefit in the end. 

Of the two hundred babies born in the past year there were only 
eighteen who did not reach the twelve-month period, which 
brings down the infant mortality to a great extent, when it is 
compared with the report of previous years. I think in the near 
future the expectant mother is going to pay more attention to 
prenatal preparation, which, medical science has proven, will 
give a better foundation to the new-born infant and also decrease 
infant mortality. 

To date there has been something like seven hundred dollars 
spent by private individuals for the care and prophylactic treat- 
ment of rabies. We have had very fine co-operation from many 
departments foi the prevention of the spread of this disease, but 
I am sorry to say, with all this aid, we have had a large number 
of people who were exposed to this most dreaded and dangerous 
menace. We have had excellent service from the State Depart- 
ment of Health ; for, whenever a head of an animal has been sent 
to their laboratory for examination and diagnosis and rabies was 
found to exist, we have always received prompt notice; and such 
prompt attention and expert advice from the state officials has 
been of inestimable value. 

The law as to the reporting of contagious diseases remains the 
same and all communicable diseases must be reported to the 
Board of Health. If a physician is not called in and a contagious 
disease exists in a family the head of said family will be held 
responsible if the case is not reported immediately upon discovery. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOTTA JOHNSON, R. N. 

82 



INSPECTOR OF SLAUGHTERING 



To the Board of Health. 

Gentlemen: 

During the year I inspected and passed as suitable for food: 

Calves 5 

Hogs 48 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOTTA JOHNSON, R. N. 

Inspector 



83 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Liabilities 

Water Bonds, 4% ($3000 due 1924) 
Water Bonds, 3%% (3000 due 1924) 
Water Bonds, 4%% (4000 due 1924) 
Sewer Bonds, 4% (5000 due 1924) 
Sewer Bonds, 5% (2000 due 1924) 
High School Loan, 4% (6000 due 1924) 



Shawsheen Bridge Loan, 4%% (2500 due 

1924) 
Main St. Loan, 4J^% (20000 due 1924) 
Sewer Bonds, \\i% (5000 due 1924) 



Shawsheen School Bonds, 

due 1924) 
Haverhill St. Note (1924) 



4/0 



(12000 



Assets 

Cash, General Fund 

Cash, Water Loan 

Cash, Rogers Brook 

Cash, Main Street Sidewalk 

Cash, Outfall Sewer 

Cash, War Memorial Committee 

Cash, Shawsheen School 

Cash, McCarthy Land Taking 

Uncollected Taxes 
Uncollected Moth Work 



$46000.00 
29000.00 
36000.00 
65000.00 
34000.00 
69000.00 

7500.00 

80000.00 

150000.00 

230000.00 
30000.00 



$31942.80 

6882.97 

985 . 20 

1160.52 

8739.53 

444.14 

187575.95 

750.00 

67548.40 
367.35 



$776500.00 



238481.11 



67915.75 



Amount carried forward 



$306396.86 



84 



A mount brought forward 




$306396.86 


Commonwealth, State Aid 


386.00 




Commonwealth, Temporary Aid 


845 . 75 




Commonwealth, Mothers' Aid 


756.26 




Towns, Mothers' Aid 


169.56 




Sewer Assessments 


6341.03 




Water Rates due January 1, 1924 


10504.60 




Sinking Funds 


44184.45 


63187.65 
406915.49 


Balance against Town 


v 




$776500.00 



85 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 



Dr. 
Balance Jan. 1, 1923, General Fund 
Balance Jan. 1, 1923, Water Loan 
Balance Jan. 1, 1923, Special Sewer Survey 
Balance Jan. 1, 1923, Main Street Loan 
Balance Jan. 1, 1923, No. Main St. appropriation 
Balance Jan. 1, 1923, Memorial Committee 
Commonwealth, Corporation Tax 
Commonwealth, Income Tax 
Commonwealth, General School Fund 
Commonwealth, Bank Tax 
Commonwealth, Reimbursement, Land taxes 
Commonwealth, Street Railway Tax 
Commonwealth, School Tuition 
Commonwealth, Industrial School 
Commonwealth, Mothers' Aid 
Commonwealth, Temporary Aid 
Commonwealth, Support of Paupers 
Commonwealth, State Aid 
Commonwealth, Military Aid 
Commonwealth, Moth Work 
Commonwealth, Hawkers' Licenses 
Commonwealth, Haverhill Street 
Commonwealth, Tuberculosis Subsidy 
Commonwealth, Refund, Teachers' Retirement 
Essex County, Haverhill Street 
Essex County, Dog Tax 
Essex County, Killing Dogs 
Andover National Bank, Notes 
Collector's Department, Taxes 
Collector's Department, Interest on Taxes 
Collector's Department, Moth Work 
Collector's Department, Interest on deposits 
Board of Public Works, Water Rates 
Board of Public Works, Service Pipe 
Board of Public Works, Sidewalk Assessments 
Board of Public Works, Refund Water Dept. 
American Woolen Co., North Main Street 

Amount carried forward 



$5424 


.42 


6882.97 


3437 


.66 


1140 


.29 


15000.00 


1200 


.00 


40613 


.10 


21926 


.36 


9547 


.36 


2716 


.35 


189 


.39 


710.52 


467 


.76 


143 


.28 


1532 


.90 


873 


.41 


260 


.00 


516 


.00 


37 


.50 


66 


.05 


98. 


.00 


8000.00 


301. 


43 


7. 


00 


4900.00 


502. 


82 


65. 


00 


290000.00 


404505 . 


34 


3042. 


06 


2695. 


70 


257. 


16 


37718. 


68 


19942. 


76 


626. 


50 


8. 


25 


15000.00 


$900356.02 



86 



account with the town of Andover 

Cr. 



Orders paid 




Town Officers 


$10397.01 


Town House 


3129.79 


Police Department 


14183.40 


Fire Department 


23825.51 


New Fire Truck 


9000.00 


Brush Fires 


999.44 


Spring Grove Cemetery 


5182.51 


Almshouse Expenses 


7171.94 


New Almshouse 


6088.43 


Outside Relief 


4950.95 


Mothers' Aid 


5324.96 


Soldiers' Relief 


1652.35 


State Aid 


386.00 


Highway Department 


75594.04 


Main Street 


15297.44 


Haverhill Street 


37405.26 


No. Main Street 


30000.00 


Main Street Sidewalk 


1839.48 


Tree Warden 


7027.14 


Moth Department 


7485.42 


Street Lighting 


9686.38 


Public Dump 


75.00 


Hay Scales 


117.60 


Sewer Dept. Maintenance 


2889.13 


Sewer Dept. Construction 


1711.49 


Outfall Sewer 


185307.86 


Special Sewer Survey 


3020.48 


Sewer House Connections 


50.85 


Sewer Sinking Fund 


1000.00 


Sewer Bonds 


7000.00 


Water Dept. Maintenance 


22120.80 


Water Dept. Construction 


32206.45 


Water Loan Bonds 


20000.00 


Water Loan Interest 


4862.50 


Water Sinking Fund 


750.00 


High School Bonds 


6000.00 


Shawsheen Bridge Bonds 


2500.00 


Main Street Bonds 


20000.00 


School Department 


111878.90 


Amount carried forward 


$698118.51 



87 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 

Dr. 



Amount brought forward 



Sewer Department, Assessments 

Sewer Department, Interest on Assessments 

Sewer Department, House Connections 

Town House, Rentals 

Fire Department, Horses and Supplies 

Almshouse 

Towns, Mothers' Aid 

Outside Relief, Reimbursement 

Spring Grove Cemetery, Sale and Care of Lots 

George A. Higgins, Town Clerk's Fees 

Trial Justice Court, Fines 

Hay Scales 

C. F. Emerson, Sealer's Fees 

School Department, Tuition and Supplies 

Board of Health, Licenses 

Old Schoolhouse, Ballardvale, Rents 

Auto Dealer's License 

Druggist License 

Smart & Flagg, Insurance Returned 

Police Department 

City of Lawrence, Outfall Sewer 

Shawsheen School Loan 

Shawsheen School Loan, Premium and Interest 

Outfall Sewer Loan 

Outfall Sewer Loan, Premium and Interest 

Sinking Fund, Water Bond Redemption 

Andover National Bank, Interest on Deposits 

Total 



$900356.02 


4928 


.19 


49 


.33 


1869 


.66 


886 


.00 


376 


.22 


68 


.00 


1291 


.13 


420 


.38 


2727 


.98 


248 


.00 


722 


.20 


60.00 


22 


.69 


944 


.60 


18 


.50 


300 


00 


25 


.00 


1 


.00 


3 


14 


112, 


00 


40311. 


17 


230000.00 


721. 


30 


150000.00 


3736. 


22 


10000.00 


1616. 


39 


$1351815. 


12 



88 



account with the town of Andover 

Cr. 



Amount brought forward 


$698118.51 


Shawsheen School 


44145.35 


Parks and Playstead 


1186.71 


Rogers Brook 


1514.80 


Interest 


22572.70 


Board of Health 


3705.91 


Miscellaneous 


569.92 


Memorial Hall Library 


4000.00 


Memorial Hall Library, Dog Tax 


502.82 


Retirement of Veterans 


300.00 


Memorial Day 


550.00 


Post 99, G. A. R. 


100.00 


Andover Post No. 8, American Legion 


827.94 


Printing and Stationery 


1945.86 


Insurance 


5127.41 


Election and Registration 


455.15 


Memorial Committee 


755.86 


Essex Tuberculosis Hospital 


2823.50 


Civil Judgment 


2926.00 


County Tax 


22708.20 


Commonwealth, Bank Tax 


2257.42 


Commonwealth, Corporation Tax 


147.17 


Commonwealth, State Tax 


24000.00 


Commonwealth, Highway Tax 


4353.00 


Commonwealth, War Poll Tax 


7737.00 


Commonwealth, Soldiers' Exemption 


2.78 


Andover National Bank, Notes 


260000.00 


Total Expenditures 


$1113334.01 


Balance on hand January 1, 1924 




General Fund 


31942.80 


Water Loan 


6882.97 


Main Street Sidewalk 


1160.52 


Rogers Brook 


985 . 20 


Outfall Sewer 


8739.53 


Shawsheen School 


187575.95 


McCarthy Land Taking 


750.00 


Memorial Committee 


444.14 




238481.11 




$1351815.12 



89 



Richardson Fund — Shawsheen Village School 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1923 $1520.57 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 75.89 

$1596.46 

Cr. 
W.A.Allen 21.00 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 1575.46 

$1596.46 



Draper Fund — School 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1923 1138.57 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 50.62 



Cr. 
Punchard Athletic Association $138 . 57 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 1050.62 



Edward Taylor Fund — Fuel 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1923 316.84 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 16.00 



Cr. 
Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 332 . 84 



Varnum Lincoln Spelling Fund 

DR. 
Balance January 1, 1923 $549.87 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 26 . 79 



Cr. 
H. C. Sanborn, Supt. of Schools $20.00 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 556.66 



90 



$1189.19 



$1189.19 



$332.84 



$332.84 



$576.66 



$576.66 



Isaac Giddings Burial Ground Fund 
Dr. 

Balance January 1, 1923 $1000.00 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 50.62 



Cr. 



Jonathan E. Holt, Trustee 
Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 



$50.62 
1000.00 



Dr. Edward C. Conroy School Fund 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1923 $250.00 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 15 91 



Cr. 
Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 


School 


$265.91 


Holt Fund- 

Dr. 
January 1, 1923 


$193.48 


Cr. 
Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 


$193.48 



Cemetery Fund 

Perpetual Care 
Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1923 $30613.08 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 1565.21 

Deposit for Perpetual Care 1675 . 00 



$1050.62 



$1050.62 



$265.91 
$265.91 



$193.48 
$193.48 



$33853.29 



Cr. 

Spring Grove Cemetery, for care of lots $448 . 75 

Private cemeteries, for care of lots 725 . 00 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 32679.54 



$33853.29 



91 



AUDITORS' CERTIFICATE 



We have examined the accounts of the several town officers 
and find them correctly cast, with satisfactory vouchers for all 
payments. 

The Town Treasurer has on deposit in Andover National 
Bank and cash on hand: 

General Fund 
Water Loan 
Main Street Sidewalk 
Rogers Brook 
Outfall Sewer 
Shawsheen School 
McCarthy Land Taking 
Memorial Committee 



$31942 


.80 


6882.97 


1160 


.52 


985 


20 


8739 


.53 


187575 


.95 


750 


.00 


444 


.14 


$238481, 


11 



JOHN S. ROBERTSON 
WALTER H. COLEMAN 
HARRY SELLARS 

A uditors 



92 



PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 



Rev. CHARLES W. HENRY, President 
HARRY H. NOYES, Clerk and Treasurer 

Rev. E. VICTOR BIGELOW MYRON E. GUTTERSON 
Rev. NE^WMAN MATTHEWS FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 
EDMOND E. HAMMOND JOHN H. CAMPION 



93 



REPORT OF TREASURER 



PRINCIPAL FUND 




January 1, 1923 




Cash in Banks 


$6911.53 


Real Estate, Mortgages and Bonds 


70088.47 




tt77ooo oo 




<jj> / / \J\J\J . \J\J 


December 31, 1923 




Cash in Banks 


11053.22 


Real Estate, Mortgages and Bonds 


65946.78 




77000 00 


INCOME 


/ / \j\jyj . \jyj 


January 1, 1923 




Cash in Bank 


1214.15 


Interest and Rents 


3679.46 



EXPENDITURES 



N. C. Hamblin, Principal 


800.00 


Helen M. Dunn, instructor 


1045.00 


Hazel Underwood, instructor 


1120.00 


M. E. Stevens, instructor 


630.00 


Postage and stationery 


13.25 


Smart & Flagg, insurance 


10.00 


Andover National Bank — box rent 


5.00 


Rogers & Angus, insurance 


25.00 


Harry H. Noyes, treasurer 


200.00 


Expense, travel, etc. 


11.45 


Legal expense 


25.00 


Balance 


1008.91 



4893.61 



94 



BARNARD FUND 
January 1, 1923 
Cash in Bank 
Dividends 

Prizes awarded 

First 

Second 

Third 
December 31, Cash in Bank 



DRAPER FUND 
January 1, 1923 
Cash in Bank 
Dividends 

Scholarship 

December 31, Cash in Bank 



$25.50 




40.00 






$65 . 50 




20.00 




12.00 




8.00 




25.50 






65.50 



1424.74 




72.10 






1496.84 


60.00 


1436.84 






1496.84 



GOLD! 


SMITH FUND 




January 1, 1923 






Cash in Bank 




266.79 


Dividends 




13.47 


Prizes awarded 


10.00 


December 31, 1923 






Cash in Bank 




270.26 



280.26 



280.26 



HARRY H. NOYES, Treasurer 



95 



TOWN WARRANT 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ss: To either of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in elections and in town affairs to meet and assemble at 
the designated polling places in Precincts One, Two, Three and 
Four, viz: The Town House in Precinct One; the Old School 
House, Ballardvale, in Precinct Two; the Boys' Club House, 
Shawsheen Village, in Precinct Three; and the Phillips Club 
House, School Street, in Precinct Four, in said Andover, on 
Monday, The Third Day of March, 1924, at 6 o'clock a.m., 
to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To elect a Moderator for one year, Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for one 
year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, one 
member of the Board of Assessors for three years, three members 
of the School Committee for three years, one member of the 
School Committee for two years (to fill vacancy), two members 
of the Board of Public Works for three years, one member of the 
Board of Health for three years, three Auditors of Accounts for 
one year, three Constables for one year, one Trustee of Memorial 
Hall Library for seven years, one Tree Warden for one year and 
all town officers required by law to be elected by ballot. Also to 
take action on the following question : Shall licenses be granted 
for the sale of certain non-intoxicating beverages in this town? 

All to be voted for on one ballot. The polls will be open from 
6 o'clock a.m. to 5 o'clock p.m. 

After final action on the preceding Article one, the said meeting 
shall stand adjourned by virtue of Section 20, Chapter 39, of the 

97 



General Laws, to Monday, March 10th, at 1.30 o'clock p.m. at 
the Town Hall, then and there to act upon the following articles, 
namely : 

Article 2. — To elect all other officers not required by law to 
be elected by ballot. 

Article 3. — To determine what sums of money shall be appro- 
priated for Almshouse Expenses, Relief out of Almshouse, Aiding 
Mothers with Dependent Children, Board of Health, Brush 
Fires, Fire Department, Hay Scales, Highway Department In- 
surance, Interest, Memorial Hall Library, Memorial Day, Post 99, 
G. A. R., Miscellaneous, Parks and Playsteads, Police, Printing, 
Election and Registration, Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital 
Maintenance, Public Dump, Retirement of Veterans, Reserve 
Fund, Redemption of Water, Sewer, High School, Main Street, 
Shawsheen Bridge and Shawsheen School Bonds, Schools, Sewer 
Maintenance, Sewer Sinking Funds, Soldiers' Relief, Spring 
Grove Cemetery, State Aid, Street Lighting, Town Officers, 
Town House, Tree Warden, Moth Department, Water Main- 
tenance, Construction, Andover Post No. 8, American Legion, 
and other town charges and expenses. 

Article 4. — To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of seventy-one thousand three hundred ninety- 
six dollars and thirteen cents ($71,396.13) levied by the County 
Commissioners of Essex County under Chapter 429 of the Acts 
of 1923 for the construction of the Tuberculosis Hospital at 
Middleton and authorize the treasurer to borrow any or all of the 
said sum or take any action relative thereto. 

Article 5. — To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to extend the water main from the Pumping 
Station, Lowell Street, to Etalo Belmessiere's residence and ap- 
propriate the sum of twenty thousand ($20,000.) dollars therefor, 
on petition of W. I. Livingston and others. 

Article 6. — To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to extend the water main from the dead end at the 
residence of William F. Trauschke along North Street as far as 
the North School at the corner of North Street and River Road 
and appropriate the sum of twenty thousand ($20,000.) dollars 
therefor, on petition of George Lee and others. 

Article 7. — To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 

98 



Public Works to extend water service on Corbett Road from the 
point in said road where such service now ends to the main 
entrance of the Sacred Heart Cemetery, and to appropriate 
therefor the sum of six thousand ($6000.) dollars, on petition of 
Edward Topping and others. 

Article 8. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
four thousand ($4000.) dollars to lay a six-inch water main on 
North Street to the home known as the Brown Place, and then 
to the home of Edward Rogers on Chandler Road, on petition of 
Geojge F. Parker and others. 

uArticle 9. ■ — To see if the Town will vote to accept as a part of 
its sewerage system a sewer on Poor Street from a point begin- 
ning at Lowell Street, and extending to a manhole at the junction 
of William Street, a distance of 1308 feet and authorize the 
assessment of betterments upon estates benefited by same, 
according to plan of John Franklin, C. E., dated December 8th, 
1923, and appropriate the sum of $5341.00 to reimburse the 
American Woolen Co. for the cost of constructing the same in 
case of said acceptance, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 10. — To see if the Town will authorize the building of 
a sewer, beginning at the terminus of the present sewer on Poor 
Street and extending a short distance on Magnolia Avenue, to a 
point near the Shawsheen School, an entire distance of about 
300 feet and appropriate the sum of $2000.00 for its construction 
and accept the same as a part of the sewerage system, on petition 
of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 11. — To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to sell to the American Woolen Company for fifteen 
hundred ($1500.00) dollars, the land owned by the town, which 
was formerly used for its filtration plant, and authorize the 
Selectmen to convey the said land by a proper deed or deeds in 
behalf of the town, the Selectmen to retain and reserve for the 
Town such rights of way as may be necessary or advisable for the 
Town to hold, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 12. — To see if the Town will accept the provisions of 
Sections 42, 43 and 44 of Chapter 48 of the General Laws relating 
to the establishment of a fire department under the control of an 
officer to be known as the Chief of the Fire Department, on 
petition of the Selectmen. 

99 



Article 13. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
sixty-five hundred ($6500.00) dollars to purchase a lot of land 
containing about seventeen (17) acres, lying between Spring 
Grove Cemetery and Porter Road, on petition of the Trustees of 
Spring Grove Cemetery. 

Article 14. — To see if the Town will vote to construct a 
granolithic sidewalk on the North and South side and in front 
of the Town Hall, also a reinforced granolithic driveway in front 
of said building and appropriate the sum of twenty-five hundred 
($2500.) dollars therefor, on petition of the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 15. — To hear and act on the report of the War Me- 
morial Committee. 

Article 16. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$2000. for the collection and disposal of garbage, and if the Town 
believes that the collection and disposal should be a self sustain- 
ing proposition, to see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to put such a plan in operation under such regulations, 
based upon the actual cost of the service and no more, as may be 
justified in order to make the service effective, on petition of 
Madeleine B. Francke and others. 

Article 17. — To see if the Town will accept Section 12 of 
Chapter 40 of the General Laws which reads as follows: 

"A Town which accepts this section, or has accepted cor- 
responding provisions of earlier laws, by a two-thirds vote at an 
annual meeting, may purchase or lease land, and erect, alter, 
enlarge, repair and improve buildings for public baths and wash 
houses, either with or without open drying grounds, and may 
make open bathing places, provide them with the requisite 
furniture, fittings and conveniences and provide instruction in 
swimming. Such Towns may establish rates for the use of such 
baths and wash houses, and appoint officers therefor and may 
make by-laws for the government of such officers, and authorize 
them to make regulations for the management thereof, and for 
the use thereof by non-residents of said Town," and also appro- 
priate the sum of two thousand ($2000.) dollars if said section is 
accepted, for the purpose of establishing and maintaining swim- 
ming baths at Pomp's Pond, on petition of John F. O'Connell and 
others. 

Article 18. — To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 

100 



sum of five thousand ($5000.) dollars to purchase a Triple Com- 
bination Pump, Chemical Tank, Hose Body, fully equipped, 
mounted on Reo Speed Wagon Chassis, on petition of the resi- 
dents of Ballard vale, same to be placed in the Ballardvale Fire 
Engine House. 

Article 19. — To see if the Town will raise and appropriate 
forty-five hundred ($4500.) dollars to erect bleachers and to 
provide playground accessories for the Plays tead, to be expended 
as the Town may direct, on petition of Andover Post, No. 8, 
American Legion, and others. 

Article 20. — To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a 
sum not exceeding three thousand ($3000.) dollars for the in- 
stalling of a new twenty (20) ton scale, on petition of Harry H. 
Remick and others. 

Article 21. — To see if the Town will accept as a town way, as 
laid out by the Selectmen, and shown on plan filed with the Town 
Clerk, a street located on the northerly side of Chestnut Street, 
about one hundred and twenty-two feet easterly of land of Burtt 
and running northerly to Summer Street, on petition of Llewel- 
lyn D. Pomeroy and others. 

Article 22. ■ — To see if the Town will vote to change the name 
of that part of Poor Street, running from Main Street south- 
westerly to Corbett Road, to Oxford Street, on petition of George 
H. Winslow and others. 

Article 23. — To see if the Town will vote to change the name 
of that part of Poor Street extending from Main and Lowell 
Streets northerly to Corbett Road, to Warwick Street, also to 
change the name of Magnolia Avenue to Warwick Street, com- 
bining these two streets under the same name, on petition of 
George H. Winslow and others. 

Article 24. — To see if the Town will place a Fire Alarm Box 
at the corner of Ballardvale Road and Woburn Street and ap- 
propriate a sum of money therefor, on petition of John Colbath 
and others. 

Article 25. — To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 
sum of $300.00 as its apportionment toward the erection of a 
sixty-foot steel forest fire observation tower on the summit of 
Prospect Hill by the Division of Forestry of Massachusetts, as 
authorized by Section 5, Chapter 40 of the General Laws. 

101 



Article 26. — To see if the Town will vote to release any 
rights acquired by it by virtue of an oral agreement made be- 
tween the Board of Public Works and Maurice J. Curran for the 
laying and maintenance of sewer pipes across the Roger Sweeney 
Field, and to authorize the Board of Public Works through its 
chairman to execute such release in behalf of the Town, on 
petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 27. — To see if the Town will vote to discontinue that 
part of Whittier Street between the Park and School property, a 
distance of 583 feet from Bartlet Street to the junction of Whit- 
tier Court and Whittier Street, so that this may become a part 
of the Park System, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 28. — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 29. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in anticipation of the revenue of the 
current financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

Article 30. — To determine what disposition shall be made of 
unexpended appropriations. 

Article 31. — To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

Article 32. — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof, seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this nineteenth day of February, A.D. 
1924. 

FRANK H. HARDY 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Selectmen of Andover 



102 



RECOMMENDATIONS OF FINANCE 
COMMITTEE 



The Finance Committee respectfully presents herewith its 
report and recommendation for the current year. 

The town has had an abnormal growth for the past few years 
and there appears reason to believe that further town develop- 
ment must be planned for. With this growth has come 
large increases in tax returns and a necessary expansion in our 
various public departments which means greater expenditures 
and an increase in the funded debt. The situation, however, has 
been a most fortunate one for us for the reason that in the 
Shawsheen Village section we have a large tax return compared 
with the expenditure the town has been called upon to make. 

It has been the custom of the Finance Committee to indicate 
to the tax payers an approximate tax rate based on recommended 
appropriations, and estimated valuation and income, and this 
custom is again followed in this report. However, we cannot 
too strongly emphasize the fact that tax rates are made by the 
voters in the town meeting; whatever the amounts voted in the 
meeting these are the amounts that must be raised by taxation, 
and the matter is entirely in the hands of the citizens. Because 
this is true it is vitally necessary that all projects involving 
expenditures and brought before the town in the form of articles 
in the warrant, should be carefully investigated and the results of 
such investigations, together with recommendations, should be 
given the voters by the proper departments. Only by following 
some such procedure can we have just and intelligent action. 
A great change has come in our community since the days when 
the great majority of the citizens went into the town meeting 
fully informed in regard to all the matters to be actedmpon. 

Included in this report is a tabulation showing the depart- 
mental appropriations voted last year, the amounts actually 
expended, the amounts recommended for the current year, and 

103 



showing also the increases and decreases. Attention is invited to 
the items "Interest" and "Redemption of bonds," inasmuch as 
these items represent an increase of $31164.80 over the amounts 
expended last year, and these two items account for over 37% of 
the total increase in the department recommendations. 



Almshouse 
Relief out 
Aiding Mothers with Dependent children 

Board of Health 

This increase of $400 over last year's appropria- 
tion is requested because of an overdraft and 
also to complete the Schick test work. 

Brush Fires 

Elections 

Four elections will be held during 1924, viz: 
Town Election, Presidential Primaries, State 
Primaries, November election. It is estimated 
that the expenses for registration, election, 
printing, etc., will average about $500 for 
each election. 

Essex County Hospital 

This is Andover's share of the cost of main- 
taining the Tuberculosis Hospital for Essex 
County. 

Fire Department 

The amount recommended is $2774.49 larger 
than the amount expended last year and the in- 
crease is for the purpose of adding two perma- 
nent men, increasing the pay of the firemen, — 
excepting the new men — to $35 a week and 
employing a permanent chief at a salary of 
$42.00 per week. It is imperative that our 
fire fighting force shall be strengthened and 
as the day of call men seems past in our town 
the employment of permanent men is the 
only c way to secure an adequate force. The 
increase in wages is the same as recommended 

Amount carried forward 



$7000.00 
6000.00 
7000.00 
4000.00 



1000.00 
2200.00 



2883.00 



26600.00 



$56683.00 



104 



Amount brought forward 

for the police. In the matter of employing a 
permanent chief the Finance Committee again 
affirms its recommendation of two years ago. 

G. A. R. 

Hay Scales 

Highways 

Maintenance $40000 . 00 

New Construction 40000 . 00 

This is an increase of $5000 over the appro- 
priation of last year and the increase applies 
to new construction. It would appear that 
the sum of $40000.00 is the least we can ap- 
propriate in order to maintain our streets and it 
would be foolish economy to neglect the 
streets already built. For new construction 
there is an ever-increasing demand. The 
plans of the Board of Public Works for new 
work on Lowell Street, Haverhill Street, Elm 
Street, and Stevens Street, will require not 
less than $40000, the sum recommended. 

Interest 

Insurance 

An increase of $500 in the insurance item is 
required to cover the new school building in 
Shawsheen Village. 

Library 

This is an increase of $500 made necessary to 
cover repairs on the Library building. 

Memorial Day 

Miscellaneous 

Park 

A small increase is recommended in this de- 
partment to pay for improvement of the new 
property now included in the Plays tead. 

Amount carried forward 



$56683.00 



100.00 

125.00 

80000.00 



41600.00 
6500.00 



4500.00 



550.00 

600.00 

1500.00 



$192158.00 



105 



Amount brought forward 



$192158.00 



Police 

A substantial increase is recommended for this 
department for the employment of one more 
officer in Shawsheen Village, and an increase 
in wages for the police officers from $30.00 to 
$34.62 per week, and an increase in the salary 
of the chief-of-police from $1872 to $2000 per 
year. 

Printing 

Public Dump 

Reserve Fund 

This is a fund recommended by the State 
Auditor for an emergency fund. 

Retirement of Veterans 

Retirement of Bonds 

The items are as follows: 

Water Bonds $10000.00 

Sewer Bonds 12000.00 

High School Bonds 6000 . 00 

Shawsheen Bridge 2500 . 00 

Main Street 20000.00 

Shawsheen School 1 2000 . 00 

Schools 

The school budget is increased $14636.10 over 
last year's expenditure, due to the mainten- 
ance of the new school in Shawsheen Village 
and also because of a proposed increase in 
the salaries of the teachers. 

Sewer Department 

Soldiers' Relief 

Spring Grove Cemetery 

State Aid 

Street Lighting 

The Committee on Street Lighting recom- 
mend extension in our street lighting system 

A mount carried forward 



18250.00 



1500.00 

75.00 

3000.00 



300.00 
62500.00 



126515.00 



6000.00 

2000.00 

5200.00 

500.00 

11000.00 


$428998.00 



106 



Amount brought forward 



$428998.00 



which will cost $1313.62 more than was ex- 
pended during 1923 and the recommendation 
is adopted by the Finance Committee. 

Town House 
Town officers 

The details which are included in this item are 
as follows: 

Selectmen, Assessors, and Overseers of the 
poor 2500.00 

Tax Collector 1800.00 

Stenographer 1 560 . 00 

Auditors 300.00 

Building Inspector 500 . 00 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 250.00 

Town Counsel (Based on 1923 payment) 650 . 00 
Bonds of Tax Collector and Treasurer 200 . 00 
Town Clerk $1000.00 

Town Treasurer 1800 . 00 

Clerk for Board of Selectmen 400 . 00 



3000.00 
11960.00 



Sundries, including 1000.00 

Stationery 

Auto Hire 

Railroad Fares 

Register of Deeds, Records 

Certification of Notes 

Extra Clerical Work 

Moderator 
Total increase in this department $660.00, 
for Town Treasurer, Clerk and Stenographer. 
Balance of increase in appropriation has 
been deducted from other departments 
through change in classification. 

Amount carried forward 



$443958.00 



107 



A mount brought forward $443958 . 00 

Tree Warden 10000.00 

Moth Work 6000.00 

Tree Work 4000.00 

This is $4512.56 less than we spent in this 
department last year and is in the judgment of 
the Finance Committee a sum entirely ade- 
quate for the town to expend from year to 
year for protection against moth ravages and 
for the care of trees and roadside trimming. 

Water Department Maintenance 33500.00 

Water Department Service Pipe 15000. 00 

This item is for cost of water installation and 
is returned to the town's treasury. 

American Legion 1 000 . 00 



$503458 . 00 



The Finance Committee recommends the following action 

regarding the articles in the warrant: — 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of seventy-one thousand three hundred ninety-six 
dollars and thirteen cents ($71,396.13) levied by the County 
Commissioners of Essex County under Chapter 429 of the 
Acts of 1923 for the construction of the Tuberculosis Hos- 
pital at Middleton and authorize the treasurer to borrow 
any or all of the said sum or take any action relative thereto. 
(It is recommended that the sum of $1396.13 be paid from 
the 1924 tax levy and the balance be raised by a bond issue, 
said bonds to be redeemed over a ten-year period.) 

Article 5. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Public 
Works to extend the water main from the Pumping Station, 
Lowell Street, to Etalo Belmessiere's residence and appro- 
priate the sum of twenty thousand ($20,000.) dollars there- 
for, on petition of W. I. Livingston and others 
(This would require an extension of about 7150 feet. The 
income from present possible takers would be about $104.00 
per year or a fraction of one percent return on the cost of the 
extension.) 

108 



Article 6. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Public 
Works to extend the water main from the dead end at the 
residence of William F. Trauschke along North Street as far 
as the North School at the corner of North Street and River 
Road and appropriate the sum of twenty thousand ($20,000.) 
dollars therefor, on petition of George Lee and others. 
(This is an extension of 7100 feet. For approximately 3000 
feet there are no houses. The annual income to the town 
from the houses now on this road would be about $138.00 
or less than one per cent of the cost. 

Article 7. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to extend water service on Corbett Road from 
the point in said road where such service now ends to the 
main entrance of the Sacred Heart Cemetery, and to appro- 
priate therefor the sum of six thousand ($6000.) dollars, on 
petition of Edward Topping and others. 
(This extension would be about 1700 feet in length. There 
would be much hard digging and considerable ledge work 
and the present available takers of water would return an 
annual income of perhaps $50.00 to the town. Furthermore, 
this street should be properly laid out before a water main is 
considered.) 

Article 8. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of four 
thousand ($4000.) dollars to lay a six-inch water main on 
North Street to the home known as the Brown Place, and 
then to the home of Edward Rogers on Chandler Road, on 
petition of George F. Parker and others. 

(This would require about 1700 feet of new pipe. The 
annual income from existing houses would be about $40.00 
per year or one per cent on the cost of the extension. 

These four articles relating to water main extensions call 
for a total outlay of fifty thousand ($50000.00) dollars, and 
the annual return from the investment would not exceed 
today three hundred and fifty ($350.00) dollars or a fraction 
of one per cent. There is in addition no prospect of enough 
growth for some years to increase this return very much. 

These proposed extensions and some others of similar 
nature which have been asked in recent years raise the 
question of what the policy of the Town should be in regard 

109 



to extension of the water system into the sections not now 
supplied. The Board of Public Works has proposed a 
general survey of the whole situation to determine where 
public water is most needed, the possibility of serving such 
areas, and the development of a comprehensive plan through 
which the system may be extended systematically as needs 
require and finances permit. 

It is the general practice of the best public water depart- 
ments to make extension of mains only in those cases where 
the return for water supplies will at once or in the near 
future pay at least four per cent on the cost of the extensions. 
This was once the practice in Andover. 

Because of the conditions above described the Finance 
Committee advises against the appropriation asked in all 
four articles. Further the Committee recommends that 
pending the survey to be made by the Board of Public 
Works the Town make water main extensions only in those 
cases where a return of not less than four per cent will be 
received from the water takers or this amount be guaranteed 
to the Town by reliable parties until the receipts bring this 
return.) 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a part of its 
sewerage system a sewer on Poor Street from a point begin- 
ning at Lowell Street and extending to a manhole at the junc- 
tion of William Street, a distance of 1308 feet and authorize the 
assessment of betterments upon estates benefited by same, 
according to plan of John Franklin, C. E., dated December 
8th, 1923, and appropriate the sum of $5341.00 to reimburse 
the American Woolen Co. for the cost of constructing the 
same in case of said acceptance, on petition of the Board of 
Public Works. 
(Approved.) 

Article 10. To see if the Town will authorize the building of a 
sewer, beginning at the terminus of the present sewer on 
Poor Street and extending a short distance on Magnolia 
Avenue, to a point near the Shawsheen School, an entire 
distance of about 300 feet and appropriate the sum of 
$2000.00 for its construction and accept the same as a part 

110 



of the sewerage system, on petition of the Board of Public 

Works. 

(Approved.) 

Article 11. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to sell to the American Woolen Company for 
fifteen hundred ($1500.00) dollars, the land owned by the 
town, which was formerly used for its filtration plant, and 
authorize the Selectmen to convey the said land by a proper 
deed or deeds in behalf of the Town, the Selectmen to retain 
and reserve for the Town such rights of way as may be 
necessary or advisable for the Town to hold, on petition of 
the Board of Public Works. 

(Approved — This land is no longer required by the Town 
and in the opinion of the Finance Committee should be made 
available for the further development of the plans of the 
American Woolen Company. The experience of the Town, 
particularly in the case of the "Almshouse land," indicates 
very clearly that the further extension of the Shawsheen 
Village section will be of large benefit to the community. 
The sum of fifteen hundred ($1500.00) dollars is, as far as 
can be ascertained, the price the town paid for this land. 

Article 12. To see if the Town will accept the provisions of 
Sections 42, 43 and 44 of Chapter 48 of the General Laws 
relating to the establishment of a fire department under the 
control of an officer to be known as the Chief of the Fire 
Department, on petition of the Selectmen. 
(Approved — The Finance Committee reaffirms its previous 
recommendation in regard to the employment of a per- 
manent fire chief.) 

Article 13. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
sixty-five hundred ($6500.00) dollars to purchase a lot of 
land containing about seventeen (17) acres, lying between 
Spring Grove Cemetery and Porter Road, on petition of the 
Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery. 

(Approved in the sum of $2000.00 — After a discussion of this 
matter with the Cemetery Trustees the Finance Committee 
recommends the purchase of the parcel of land containing 
five acres of land immediately adjoining the present cemetery 
holdings and appropriating $2000.00 therefor.) 

Ill 



Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to construct a grano- 
lithic sidewalk on the North and South side and in front of 
the Town Hall, also a reinforced granolithic driveway in 
front of said building and appropriate the sum of twenty- 
five hundred ($2500.) dollars therefor, on petition of the 
Board of Selectmen. 

(Not approved — Careful consideration of this proposal 
suggests the need of further examination of the plan of 
improvement and the Finance Committee therefore recom- 
mends, with the approval of the selectmen, that the matter 
be postponed.) 

Article 15. To hear and act on the report of the War Memorial 
Committee. J 

(No action required of the Finance Committee.) 

Article 16. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$2000. for the collection and disposal of garbage, and if the 
Town believes that the collection and disposal should be a 
self sustaining proposition, to see if the Town will authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to put such a plan in operation under 
such regulations, based upon the actual cost of the service 
and no more, as may be justified in order to make the service 
effective, on petition of Madeleine B. Francke and others. 
(A satisfactory plan for handling this work has not been 
developed. The Finance Committee recommends that 
whatever method is adopted by the Town the entire cost of 
this service shall be paid by those who receive the service 
as it would be available only for the thickly settled parts of 
the Town. Some funds may be necessary to put any plan 
into operation and therefore an appropriation of $2000 is 
approved to be used under these conditions.) 

Article 17. To see if the Town will accept Section 12 of Chapter 
40 of the General Laws which reads as follows : — 

"A Town which accepts this section, or has accepted 
corresponding provisions of earlier laws, by a two- thirds 
vote at an annual meeting, may purchase or lease land, and 
erect, alter, enlarge, repair and improve buildings for public 
baths and wash houses, either with or without open drying 
grounds, and may make open bathing places, provide them 
with the requisite furniture, fittings and conveniences and 

112 



provide instruction in swimming. Such Towns may es- 
tablish rates for the use of such baths and wash houses, and 
appoint officers therefor and may make by-laws for the 
government of such officers, and authorize them to make 
regulations for the management thereof and for the use 
thereof by non-residents of said Town," and also appro- 
priate the sum of two thousand ($2000.) dollars if said sec- 
tion is accepted, for the purpose of establishing and main- 
taining swimming baths at Pomp's Pond, on petition of 
John F. O'Connell and others. 

(Not approved — The Finance Committee agrees that the 
work started last year by interested citizens for providing 
bathing facilities at Pomp's Pond was a desirable thing to do. 
The Committee feels, however, that it would be well to test 
this out for another year under private auspices and deter- 
mine more exactly the definite needs before asking the Town 
to take over the equipment and supervision. If after another 
year's trial, it seems wise , to have the Town take over this 
work, definite plans and estimates of the facilities to be 
provided should be presented to the Selectmen so that full 
information can be presented to the Town before the next 
Town meeting.) 

Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum 
of five thousand ($5000.) dollars to purchase a Triple Com- 
bination Pump, Chemical Tank, Hose Body, fully equipped, 
mounted on Reo Speed Wagon Chassis, on petition of the 
residents of Ballardvale, same to be placed in the Ballardvale 
Fire Engine House. 

(Not approved- — The residents of Ballardvale request that 
a piece of motor driven apparatus be established in that 
section of the Town principally for use in fighting brush 
fires, and it is recommended that the Selectmen and the 
Board of Engineers investigate the matter and report with 
recommendation at the next annual town meeting.) 

Article 19. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate forty- 
five hundred ($4500.) dollars to erect bleachers and to 
provide playground accessories for the Plays tead, to be 
expended as the Town may direct, on petition of Andover 
Post, No. 8, American Legion, and others. 

113 



(Not approved — The question of the use of a public play- 
stead is an involved one, particularly in Andover, where it is 
the only available field for high school contests which must 
be self sustaining. In the opinion of the Finance Com- 
mittee the entire proposition of the development of the 
Plays tead for larger recreation purposes, the erection of 
stands for spectators and the possibilities of giving the use 
of the field and its equipment to the High School under 
conditions which will make possible some revenue for the 
support of athletics, warrants a careful and comprehensive 
study by the Board of Public Works, and it is so recom- 
mended.) 

Article 20. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum 
not exceeding three thousand ($3000.) dollars for the in- 
stalling of a new twenty (20) ton scale, on petition of Harry 
H. Remick and others. 
(Not approved.) 

Article 21. To see if the Town will accept as a town way, as 
laid out by the Selectmen, and shown on plan filed with the 
Town Clerk, a street located on the northerly side of Chest- 
nut Street about one hundred and twenty-two feet easterly 
of land of Burtt and running northerly to Summer Street, 
on petition of Llewellyn D. Pomeroy and others. 
(Approved.) 

Articles 22 and 23 require no action on the part of the Finance 
Committee. 

Article 24. To see if the Town will place a Fire Alarm Box at 
the corner of Ballardvale Road and Woburn Street and 
appropriate a sum of money therefor, on petition of John 
Colbath and others. 
(Referred to Fire Engineers.) 

Article 25. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum 
of $300.00 as its apportionment toward the erection of a 
sixty-foot steel forest fire observation tower on the summit 
of Prospect Hill by the Division of Forestry of Massachusetts 
as authorized by Section 5, Chapter 40 of the General Laws. 
(Approved.) 

The subsequent articles in the warrant require no action 
on the part of the Finance Committee. 

114 



SUMMARY 

Department expenditure recommended 
Special expenditures recommended 
State and County taxes (estimated) 
Haverhill Street note 



Estimated receipts 

Net 



$503458.00 
13037.13 
50000.00 
30000.00 

$596495.13 
150000.00 

$446495.13 



Valuation 



1923 
$14824470.00 



1924 (est.) 
$16250000.00 



Computation of tax rate for 1924 using these figures 
$446495.13 

= $27.45 

$16250000.00 

Tax rate 1923, $26.70. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY A. BODWELL, Chairman 
GEORGE ABBOT E. V. FRENCH 

GEORGE L. AVERILL C. W. HOLLAND 

GEORGE H. WINSLOW JOHN C. ANGUS, Secretary 
Finance Committee 



115 



DEPARTMENT APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURE FOR 1923 
AND RECOMMENDATION FOR 1924 



Department 


Appro- 
priated 
1923 


Expended 
1923 


Recom- 
mended 
1924 


Increase 


Decrease 


Almshouse 


6600 


7171.99 


7000 




171.99 


Relief Out 


5000 


4950.95 


6000 


1049.05 




Aiding Mothen 


2500 


5324.96 


7000 


1675.04 




Board of Health 


3600 


3705.91 


4000 


294.09 




Brush Fires 


1000 


999.44 


1000 


.56 




Elections 


600 


455.15 


2200 


1744.85 




Essex Co. Hosp'l 


2823 


2823.50 


2883 


59.50 




Fire Department 


23930 


23825.51 


26600 


2774.49 




G. A. R. 


100 


100.00 


100 






Hay Scales 


125 


117.60 


125 


7.40 




Highways 


75000 


75594.04 


80000 


4405.96 




Interest 


20500 


27435.20 


41600 


14164.80 




Insurance 


6000 


5127.41 


6500 


1372.59 




Library 


4000 


4000.00 


4500 


500.00 




Memorial Day 


550 


550.00 


550 






Miscellaneous 


1200 


569.92 


600 


30.08 




Parks 


1200 


1186.71 


1500 


313.29 




Police 


14500 


14183.40 


18250 


4066 . 60 




Printing 


2000 


1945.86 


1500 




445.86 


Public Dump 


75 


75.00 


75 






Reserve Fund 






3000 


3000 




Retirement of 












Veterans 


300 


300.00 


300 






Retirement of 












Bonds 


35500 


45500.00 


62500 


17000.00 




Schools 


111883 


111878.90 


126515 


14636.10 




Sewer Dept. 


4000 


4600.62 


6000 


1399.38 




Soldiers' Relief 


1500 


1652.35 


2000 


347.65 




Spring Grove 


5200 


5182.51 


5200 


17.49 




State Aid 


600 


386.00 


500 


114.00 




Street Lighting 


10000 


9686.38 


11000 


1313.62 




Town House 


3000 


3129.79 


3000 




129.79 


Town Officers 


10400 


10397.01 


11960 


1562.99 




Tree Warden 


15000 


14512.56 


10000 




4512.56 


Water Dept. 












Maint. 


37000 


22120.80 


33500 


11379.20 




Service Pipe 




19942.76 


15000 




4942.76 


American Legion 


1000 


827.94 


1000 


172.06 




Totals \ 


>406686 


$430260.17 


$503458 


$83400.79 


$10202.96 


Recommendec 


for 1924 






$50345* 


.00 


Total Expendi 


tures, 192 


3 




430260 


.17 


Increase 


$73197 


.83 



TRUSTEES OF 
MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



E. KENDALL JENKINS ALFRED E. STEARNS 

FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL BURTON S. FLAGG 
NATHAN C. HAMBLIN FREDERICK A. WILSON 

PHILIP F. RIPLEY 

President 
E. KENDALL JENKINS 

Secretary and Treasurer 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 

Librarian 
EDNA A. BROWN 

Assistants 
JULIA E. TWICHELL EDITH DONALD 

In Charge of Ballardvale Branch 
MARTHA D. BYINGTON 

Janitor 
ARCHIBALD MACLAREN 



117 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



THE FIFTY-FIRST REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



The trustees submit the following report of the library for 1923. 

For particulars of the work and condition of the library we 
refer the citizens to the accompanying report of the librarian 
with its interesting suggestions. 

The output of books has varied little from that of the previous 
year. It is worthy of note that more than 3000 cards are now in 
use and that the number of men taking books from the library 
is increasing. 

New residents in Shawsheen Village are availing themselves 
of the advantages of the library and their interest in its service is 
heartily welcomed. 

The celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the dedication of 
the building last May, drew out a large audience at the public 
exercises in the town hall and stimulated interest in the past 
history and present work of the library. 

A limited number of copies of the printed report of the cele- 
bration containing the addresses of Principal A. E. Stearns and 
of Dr. J. Edgar Park can be had on application to the librarian. 

Since the present year opened the library has received from 
General William F. Bartlett Post 99 of the G. A. R., 142 volumes, 
bound in calf, containing the "Official Records of the Union and 
Confederate Armies of the Rebellion", which will be of much 
value for reference. 

With more than 26000 books in the library and fully 700 
added each year there is increasing need of more shelf room. 
Each year increases the use of the books by our schools. It is 
becoming difficult to accommodate with books and with room 
for study, the large number of pupils who now use the library on 
certain days. 

118 



The town must soon plan to provide larger quarters for the 
library if it is to meet the present demands made upon it and 
accomplish the purpose for which it was founded. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. KENDALL JENKINS, Chairman 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 
BURTON S. FLAGG 
NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 
PHILIP F. RIPLEY 
ALFRED E. STEARNS 
FREDERICK A. WILSON 



119 



TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 
In account with the Town of Andover, Mass. 



RECEIPTS 



Balance from last year 

Town Appropriation 

Dog Tax 

Income from Investments 

Fines 

Bequest 

Cash paid for lost books 

Gift for books 

Sale of paper 



Total 



Salaries 

Lighting and Heating 

Periodicals 

Bookbinding 

Books 

Insurance 

Office Expenses 

Safety Deposit Box 

Sundry Items 

Cash on hand 

Total 



EXPENDITURES 



$1732.76 


4000.00 


502.82 


3465.72 


280.81 


100.00 


18.40 


5.00 


2.00 


$10107.51 


$4810.15 


753.91 


233.26 


286.45 


967.55 


322.53 


109.56 


12.50 


263.02 


2348.58 


$10107.51 



120 



Classification of Income and Expenditures for the Year 1923 





INCOME 










Maint. 


Books 


Cornell 


Total 


Income from Investments 


$2134.66 


$975.56 


$355.50 


$3465.72 


Appropriation 


4000.00 






4000.00 


Dog Tax 


502.82 






502.82 


Fines 


280.81 






280.81 


Cash paid for lost books 




18.40 




18.40 


Gift for books 




5.00 




5.00 


Sale of paper 


2.00 






2.00 


Bequest 




100.00 




100.00 



Total 



$6920.29 $1098.96 $355.50 $8374.75 



EXPENDITURES 



Salaries 


$4697.83 




$112.32 


$4810.15 


Lighting and Heating 


564.82 




189.09 


753.91 


Periodicals 


233.26 






233.26 


Bookbinding 


286.45 






286.45 


Books 




967.55 




967.55 


Insurance 


322.53 






322.53 


Office Expenses 


109.56 






109.56 


Safe Deposit Box 


12.50 






12.50 


Sundry Items 


263.02 


$967.55 




263.02 


Total 


$6489.97 


$301.41 


$7758.93 


Unexpended balances 


430.32 


131.41 


54.09 


615.82 



Condition of Funds and Unexpended Income, Jan. 1924 



Maintenance Fund 
Book Funds 

Cornell Fund (Permanent) 
Cornell Fund (Purchase) 
Special Funds and cash 

Total 

Deficit in Maintenance Income 

Balance of funds on hand 



Funds 


Income 


$46600.00 


*$369.69 


17400.00 


1045.96 


5000.00 


387.37 


4491.32 


930.35 




354.59 


$73491.32 


$2718.27 




*369.69 



$2348.58 



121 



INVESTMENTS 

Bangor & Aroostook R.R., 4s 
Boston Elevated Ry. Co., 4s 
Boston Elevated Ry. Co., 4J^s 
Chicago Railways Co., 5s 
Montreal Tramways Co., 5s 
Southern Cal. Edison Co., 5s and 5J^s 
Boston & Maine R.R., 4s 
Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co., 5s 
New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., 5s 
Louisville Gas & Electric Co., 5s 
The Dayton Power & Light Co., 5s 
Utah Power & Light Co., 6s 
Am. Tel. & Tel. Stock, 4 shares 
Savings Banks 
Principal cash 



Total Funds 



$11000.00 


10000.00 


1000.00 


9962 


.50 


9962 


.50 


7939 


.85 


2000'. 00 


1000 


.00 


989 


.00 


915 


.00 


940 


.00 


1030.00 


571 


.50 


15891 


.32 


289 


.65 


$73491.32 



FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 

Treasurer 



January 31, 1924 

This certifies that we have examined and found correct the 
above statements as of January 26, 1924, whereby all securities 
held against the several funds have been examined and the 
income accruing from same accounted for. All disbursements 
are supported by receipts in proper form and the cash has been 
verified and found correct. 

BURTON S. FLAGG 
PHILIP F. RIPLEY 

Finance Committee 



122 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 



To the Trustees of the Memorial Hall Library: 
Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit the report of the library for the twelve 
months ending December 31, 1923. 

The number of books issued for home use during the year was 
46,189, of which 6491 were borrowed through the branch at 
Ballard vale. This total is approximately the same as for 1922, 
but it is interesting to note that at the Memorial Hall 73% of all 
books issued were taken by grown people, while 27% were 
borrowed by children. The books issued to adults comprised 
33% non-fiction; those to children 44%. The year shows also a 
large registration of new borrowers, with men in good proportion. 

The usual routine of the library has gone on, with a gratifying 
amount of reference work done with the schools, the different 
local clubs and societies. Books have been lent to the outlying 
schools, sent to the four distant districts, and issued on vacation 
cards. The usual lectures on the use of the library were given to 
the sophomores in the Punchard High School. 

The library's friends have been generous in remembering it 
with gifts. Five extremely valuable books on the history of art 
were given us by one gentleman, all books which we could not 
have bought from our own funds. Other thoughtful people have 
turned over for our use copies of recent novels which they had 
read and did not care to keep permanently. Still others have 
brought us works on more serious subjects, essays, biography or 
travel. All these gifts add just that much to the amount we can 
do with our regular book funds. 

The outstanding event of the year was the observance, on 
Sunday evening, May 27th, of the fiftieth anniversary of the 
dedication of the Memorial Hall, and the opening of the library. 
Before a large assembly in the Town Hall, a summary of the 

123 



library's half-century of usefulness and progress was given by 
Dr. Alfred E. Stearns, and Rev. J. Edgar Park held the absorbed 
attention of his audience as he spoke on books and the value of 
reading, under the title of "The Biography of the Unknown." 
At this meeting were seven persons who had been present at the 
dedication of the building. 

The branch at Ballard vale also celebrated, early in May, its 
tenth anniversary. The branch library kept open house for the 
afternoon and evening, with callers numbering several hundred. 
Mr. Nathan C. Hamblin spoke briefly for the Trustees. The 
usefulness of this branch to Ballardvale, and the appreciation in 
which it is held, show plainly in the fact that in the ten years of 
it's life, it has circulated 67,739 books. 

The observance of our fiftieth anniversary and the question of 
the form which the war memorial shall take, has recently oc- 
casioned some public discussion concerning the Memorial Hall 
considered as a building. It should be remembered that it was a 
library which was created as a memorial to the Civil War heroes, 
and that the building was only the shell. Whatever may be 
one's private opinion of the architectural value of the Memorial 
Hall, those who criticise that tribute to the soldiers of 1861, 
cannot fail to realize that the library itself — the soul of that 
building — is very far from being either obsolete, dead, or 
unappreciated. For a half-century it has functioned as a power- 
ful, though quiet force in the life of the community, spreading 
its influence through hundreds of homes and thousands of lives. 
Its use increased from an initial circulation of 11,000 books a 
year to over 51,000. 

This past November, in connection with Miss Mary Byers 
Smith of the Hampshire Bookshop, we arranged an intensive 
observance of Good Book Week for children. A committee of 
about forty representative people was asked to meet for a con- 
ference at the Townsman office, and this meeting resulted in 
arousing the interest of town in all its different sections. The 
school children made posters and wrote compositions on books 
and reading, and not a few came to the library and took cards. 

A special program was arranged for one day at the Colonial 
Theatre, the manager kindly permitting the committee appointed 
to choose the films. The two selected were "The Prince and the 

124 



Pauper", and "Columbus," the first of the series of historical 
films being staged by the Yale University Press. There was a 
continuous performance before a crowded house, containing 
many people who do not often attend the movies. 

We were fortunate enough to secure Mrs. Mary E. S. Root, 
formerly children's librarian at the Providence Public Library, 
for two lectures on reading for children. One was given under 
the auspices of the Shawsheen Women's Club, and the other 
under that of the Memorial Hall Library, at a meeting held at 
Abbot Academy. Miss Alice E. Blanchard, of the Hampshire 
Bookshop, was the other speaker. Mrs. Root also spoke at the 
Haverhill Public Library and at Bradford Academy. 

From a suggestion made at the first committee meeting grew 
a loan exhibition of old-fashioned books for children, held at the 
library for two weeks during November. Over 250 books were 
brought for this purpose, from thirty different homes, and the 
result interested hundreds of visitors. One surprising outcome 
was that the exhibition, which it was supposed would be of 
interest chiefly to the grown people, captivated the children. 
They read with great enjoyment through the glass cases, the 
queer pages of old-time moral tales, and were genuinely dis- 
appointed that they could not borrow the books. 

Ballardvale also took part in the observance of Good Book 
Week. Miss Caroline Underhill, of the Utica Public Library, 
spoke at a well-attended meeting arranged by the Mothers' Club 
in the Bradlee School. 

Last year we considered seriously the opening of a branch at 
Shawsheen. It seemed an advisable thing to do, and, on receipt 
of a petition from the Shawsheen Women's Club, the Trustees 
made an unsuccessful effort to find a suitable room. None was 
available, so the project was postponed. The large and rapid 
growth of that part of town is now putting a different aspect on 
the question. With a population increasing by leaps and bounds, 
it would be impossible to give satisfactory service by means of a 
small branch library. After careful observation of the situation, 
and after talking with people living in Shawsheen, your librarian 
has come to the conclusion that the service wanted by that 
section of town can best be given by increasing and enlarging the 
resources and ability of the main library. Numerous borrowers 

125 



have registered from Shawsheen, who express themselves as 
perfectly content to use the central library, and it is evident, 
from the books they draw, that the necessarily limited collection 
in a branch would never satisfy their wants. The distance from 
Andover Square to Shawsheen is no farther than to Andover 
Hill, and there has never been a suggestion that a branch should 
there be established. In these days of automobiles a mile is 
hardly a barrier to any one who wants a book. There is also 
another factor in the situation in the new building which the 
South Lawrence Library is to have in a section neighboring to 
Shawsheen. It will doubtless be desirable, when the Shawsheen 
school building is completed, to arrange with the teachers about 
having special loans of books for the use of the younger children. 
This can be done, if we can enlarge our collection of children's 
books, limited now both by lack of space and lack of funds. 

This question of sufficient books for the children comes up 
when we consider only the centre of town. The work with the 
schools is always heavy, but during the term just past, we were 
unable to meet the demands made upon us. When a class of 
twenty children arrives at the library, each hopefully intent 
upon a book about the Philippines, we have only about five 
suited to their needs. The rest must content themselves with the 
encyclopedia, and it is strange that they ever return, after having 
such a cold stone offered them. The very next day the affair is 
staged again, with Italy or Africa or lumbering as the subject. 
Different teachers wish to reserve books for their classes, and it 
is with the utmost difficulty that we can squeeze out any space 
whatever for this purpose. 

Teachers and children alike have a right to expect more than 
the library is now able to give them. We have teachers coming 
to Andover, who are accustomed to well-equipped libraries, and 
much as we wish to give them the help they have had elsewhere, 
no one can make three books do the work of fifteen. The library, 
through inadequate space and insufficient equipment, is failing 
the schools in an essential part of its educational work. And the 
work with the children is so important that it seems surprising 
how year after year their needs can be repeatedly stressed and 
receive no response. These children are the hope of the town, 
the "hope of the world" as Hagedorn puts it, yet they have 

126 



neither the special room nor the books which the library needs 
for them and which the town really owes them. 

The Memorial Hall Library is both a social center and an 
educational institution. The scope of its influence and of its 
service to the whole community is determined by the opportunity 
given it by the town. 

Respectfully submitted. 

EDXA A. BROWN 

Librarian 



127 



STATISTICS OF THE LIBRARY 

Number of books issued for home use at the Memorial 

Hall 39698 

Number issued at Ballardvale 6491 

Total for the year of 1923 46189 

Number of borrowers' cards actually in use 3309 

Books added by purchase 641 

Books added by gift 135 

Total additions 776 

Books withdrawn, worn out, etc. 196 

Total numbers of books in the library 26343 

Volumes rebound 223 

Volumes bound, periodicals, etc. 59 

BALLARDVALE 

Number of books issued for home use 6491 

Number of cards in use 415 

Books added by purchase 80 

Books added by gift 22 

Total additions 102 

Books now belonging to the branch 1859 



GIFTS 

Gifts of books and pamphlets are acknowledged from state 
and government departments, from other libraries, from the 
A. V. I. S. and from the following individuals: 

Mrs. Walter Buck; M. W. Colquhoun; Ruth Davis; Mrs. 
A. E. Foote; J. C. Graham; Rev. C. W. Heniy; Vaughan Jealous; 
Mrs. Andrew Lawrie; George Millett; Mrs. H. G. Nesbitt; 
Alfred Ripley; George Ripley; Hon. J. J. Rogers; Rev. F. R. 
Shipman; P. W. Sprague; Emily Tracy; Dr. Roger Tracy. 



128 



INFORMATION FOR USERS OF THE LIBRARY 

The Memorial Hall Library is open every day except Sundays 
and legal holidays from 9 to 12.30 in the morning, and from 
3 to 9 in the afternoon and evening. 

Any resident of Andover over ten years of age may have a 
library card upon filling out an application blank. Children in 
grades below the Punchard School are required to have their 
applications endorsed by both parent and teacher. 

All grown people are allowed to take any reasonable number 
of books, provided that only one is a seven-day book. The 
Punchard pupils are permitted to borrow two, one fiction and one 
non-fiction. 

Books are issued for fourteen days, the date upon which the 
book is due being stamped plainly on the "date due" slip at the 
time of issue. A book kept overtime incurs a fine of two cents 
for every day overdue. A few of the books most in demand are 
issued for seven days only. All these are labeled upon the book 
pocket, "Seven-day book." Books lost or damaged must be 
paid for. 

Seven-day books are not renewed or reserved Tor anyone. 
Other books may be renewed if no one else has asked for them, 
and if a work not fiction is especially desired for any serious 
purpose, notice of its return to the library will be sent on request. 

The shelves of the whole library are open to all grown people. 
The books are arranged according to subjects, and it is often 
much more satisfactory to go to the shelves and examine the 
books than to depend upon the catalogue. 

The new books are listed at intervals in the weekly paper, and 
cumulated in the yearly library report, but the only complete 
record is the card catalogue. This catalogue is arranged alpha- 
betically like a dictionary. To find whether any given book is in 
the library, look for it under the surname of the author, or under 
its title. The right-hand drawers of the case contain a second 
arrangement of cards where the books are entered according to 
the subjects of which they treat. 

129 



The new books purchased each month are placed for some 
weeks in a special case on the north side of the reading room, so 
that the most recent additions to the library may be found 
there. The library buys only a limited amount of new fiction 
but it tries to fill the wants of the community in regard to other 
books desired. People are invited to suggest for purchase the 
titles of books they wish. 

The library staff is always glad to answer questions or in any 
way to help visitors find what they want. 



LIST OF PERIODICALS AND NEWSPAPERS TAKEN FOR 
THE READING ROOM 

American city 

American Legion weekly (gift) 

American monthly review of reviews 

Atlantic monthly 

Blackwood's magazine 

Bookman 

Book review digest 

Catholic world 

Century 

Christian Endeavor world (gift) 

Country gentleman 

Country life in America 

Cumulative book index 

Etude 

Federation topics (gift) 

Forum 

Garden magazine (gift) 

Guide to nature (gift) 

Harper's magazine 

House beautiful (gift) 

India lubber world (gift) 

International studio (gift) 

Ladies' home journal 

130 



Library journal 

Life 

Literary digest 

Lit tell 's living age 

London weekly Times 

Missionary review of the world 

National geographic magazine 

Nineteenth century 

North American review 

Open road 

Outer's Recreation 

Outlook 

Popular mechanics 

Public libraries 

Radio News 

Readers' guide to periodical literature 

St. Nicholas 

School arts magazine 

Scientific Ameiican 

Scribner's magazine 

Survey 

Textile world (gift) 

The Woman Citizen 

Woman's home companion 

World's work 

Youth's companion 

Andover Townsman 

Boston Herald 

Boston Transcript 

Christian Science Monitor 

Lawrence Telegram 

New York Times 



131 



NEW BOOKS ADDED DURING 1923 



State and government documents are not listed. Duplicates, replacements 
and books for the Ballard vale branch are also omitted. 

{Books marked * are gifts) 

GENERAL REFERENCE BOOKS 

903 S79 Standard dictionary of facts. 

912 T48 Times Survey Atlas. 

929 V83 *Vital Records of Deerfield, Acton, Mendon, Plympton. 

929.2 C76 *Chamberlain, G. W. comp. The Spragues of Maiden, Mass. 

PERIODICALS 

051 R32 American monthly Review of Reviews, v. 66, 67. 

071 A552 Andover Townsman, v. 35. 

051 A881 Atlantic monthly, v. 130, 131. 

052 B56 Blackwood's Edinburgh magazine, v. 212, 213. 
051 B64 Bookman, v. 56, 57. 

051 C33 Century, v. 104. 

051 F77 Forum, v. 68, 69. 

716 G16 Garden magazine, v. 36. 

051 H23 Harper's magazine, v. 145. 

705 H81 House beautiful, v. 53. 

705 161 *International studio, v. 75, 76. 

020.5 L61 Library journal, v. 47. 

051 L71 Littell's living age, v. 314-317. 

910.5 N21 National geographic magazine, v. 42-43. 

052 N62 Nineteenth century v. 92, 93. 
051 N81 North American review, v. 217. 
051 094 Outlook, v. 132, 133. 

621 P81 Popular mechanics, v. 38, 39. 

020.5 P96 Public libraries, v. 27. 

051 S147 St. Nicholas, v. 49, pt. 2, v. 50, pt. 1. 

370.5 S35 School arts magazine, v. 22. 

605 S416 Scientific American, v. 127, 128. 

051 S434 Scribner's magazine, v. 73. 

051 W89 World's Work, v. 45. 

ETHICAL AND RELIGIOUS BOOKS 

(Purchased chiefly from the Phillips Fund) 
225 B13 Bacon, B. W. Making of the New Testament. 

231 B38 Beckwith, C. A. The idea of God. 

204 B75 Brewster, E. T. Understanding of religion. 

132 



226 B75 
268 B81 
268 C16 
173 C41 
268 C79o 
268 E29s 
230 F78 
291 F86 
232 G66 
172.4 G95 
173 H13 
267.3 H24 
150 H72 
266 H74 

215 K25 
270 L14 

150 M61 
133 M99 
792 012 
232.9 P19 
237 P27 
221 P51h 
131 P61 
225 P81 
131 P99 
131 R44 
248 R81 
173 S79 
150 T15 
220 V32 
131 W16h 



Brewster, H. S. The simple gospel. 
*Brown, F. L. The superintendent. 

Candler, Martha. Drama in religious service. 

Cheley, F. H. Job of being a dad. 

Cope, H. F. Organizing the church school. 

Eggleston, M. W. Stories for special days. 

Fosdick, H. E. Christianity and progress. 

Frazer, J. G. The golden bough. 

Gore, Charles. Belief in Christ. 

Gulick, S. L. Christian crusade for a warless world. 

Hale, B. F. R. What's wrong with our girls? 
*Harris, Frederick, ed. Service with fighting men. 2 v. 

Hollingworth, H. L. Judging human character. 

Holtom, D. C. ed. Christian movement in Japan, Korea, 

and Formosa. 

Keen, W. W. 

Lake, Kirsopp 

tianity. 

Miller, H. C. The new psychology and the teacher. 

Myers, F. W. H. Human personality. 

Oberholtzer, E. P. Morals of the movie. 

Papini, Giovanni. Life of Christ. 

Pattison, A. S. Pringle- Idea of immortality. 

Phelps, W. L. Human nature in the Bible. 

Pierce, Frederick. Our unconscious mind. 

Peake, A. S. Critical introduction to the New Testament. 

Pym, T. W. Psychology and the Christian life. 

Riggs, A. F. Just nerves. 

Royden, A. M. Prayer as a force. 

Stearns, A. E. Challenge of youth. 

Tansley, A. G. The new psychology. 

Van Loon, Hendrik. Story of the Bible. 

Walsh, J. J. Health through will power. 



I believe in God and in evolution. 
Landmarks in the history of early Chris- 



EDUCATION AND ECONOMICS 

395 B64 Book of business etiquette. 

371 B64 Boraas, Julius. Teaching to think. 

373 B76 Briggs, T. H. The junior high school. 

321.8 B84 Bryce, James. Modern democracies. 2v. 

304 C81 Corbin, John. Return of the middle class. 

371 D29 Davis, S. E. Technique of teaching. 

395 D42 Dennis, M. W. Training school of popularity. 

371 D515 Dewey, J. M. How to teach manners to school children. 
335 D74 *Doughty, W. H. Socialism and the average man. 

792 E47 Ellis and Thornborough. Motion pictures in education. 

340 G79 *Gray, J. C. Nature and sources of the law. 

353 H69 Holcombe, A. N. State government in the United States. 

301 L66 Lippmann, Walter. Public opinion. 

331.8 M22 MacLean, A. M. Our neighbors. 

372 W46 Wells, M. E. A project curriculum. 



133 



640 A42 


643 B15 


630 C62 


636 C85 


640 D71 


716 Ell 


637 E66 


636.5 H72 


716 K58v 


647 L88 


649 S65 


635 W65 


613 W67 


664 B15 


537.8 C87 


537.8 C95 


696 D54 


621.3 F81 


629.1 G59 


654 H29 


570 K29 


671 K53 


590 L85m 


654 R16 


523 S492 


696 W67 


745 A18 


704 A51 


749 C23n 


709 C82 


749 D98 


709 F27 


793 G271 


780.9 L13 


738 L52 


745 L58 


795 M76 


759.4 M29 


738 M38 


738 P41 


395 P84 


728 S43 


795 W58 



FARM AND HOME MANAGEMENT 

Allen, Edith. Mechanical devices in the home. 
Bailey, E. H. S. Food products. 
*Cobb, I. S. The abandoned farmers. 
Crandall, L. S. Pets, their care and history. 
Donham, S. A. Spending the family income. 
Earle, A. M. Old-time gardens. 
Erdman, H. E. Marketing of whole milk. 
Hannas, R. R. Popular poultry pointers. 
King, Mrs. Francis. Variety in the little garden. 
Lord, I. E. Getting your money's worth. 
Smith, R. M. The baby's first two years. 
Wilkinson, A. E. Sweet corn. 
Williams, J. F. Personal hygiene applied. 

SCIENCE, MECHANICAL AND USEFUL ARTS 

Bailey, E. H. S. Food products from afar. 

Croft, Terrill. American electrician's handbook. 

Cushing, H. C. Standard wiring. 

Dibble, S. E. Plumbers' handbook. 

Foster, H. A. comp. Electrical engineer's handbook. 

Good, A. A. Ford car, truck and tractor repair. 

Hausmann, Erich. Radio phone receiving. 

Kellogg, Vernon. Human life as the biologist sees it. 

Kidder, F. S. Triangulation applied to sheet metal cutting. 

Long, W. J. Mother Nature. 

Ranger, R. H. Radio pathfinder. 

Serviss, G. P. Astronomy in a nutshell. 

Williams, H. V. The new tinsmith's helper. 

FINE ARTS 

Ackerman, Phyllis. Wallpaper. 
*American Institute of Architects. Significance of the fine 

arts. 

Carrick, A. Van L. Next-to-nothing house. 
*Cotterhill, H. B. History of art. v.l. 

Dyer, W. A. Lure of the antique. 
*Faure, Elie. History of art. 3 v. 

Geister, Edna. Let's play. 

Lahee, H. C. Annals of music in America. 

Lehmann and Kennard. Glass and glassware. 

Lewis, G. G. Practical book of oriental rugs. 

Montgomery, G. C. Modern auction. 

Male, Emile. Religious art in France. 
*Masse, H. J. L. J. Chats on old pewter. 

Percival, Maclver. The glass collector. 

Post, Emily. Etiquette. 

Seabury, J. S. New homes under old roofs. 

Whitehead, W. C. Auction bridge standards. 

134 



808 C88 


824 C72 


822 D29 


824 El4p 
827 F87 


821.08 H55 


655 J41 

808 K68 


827 L45o 


824 L96a 


824 M81i 


808 M88 


928 096a 


655 P14 


827 P16 


822 P76 


808 R56 


824 S44 


824 S53m 


822.08 S53w 


824 W244g 
822.08 W39 


916.4 A57 


917.446 B13g 
917.8 B38 


910.4 B62 


916.7 B72 


914.6 B816 


910 B84 


917.98 B94 


917.3 C42 


915.1 E56 


914.92 F32 


918 F81 


915 F81 


917.8 F87 


917.4 G83 


914 H88 


910 H92 


914.98 L24 


910 L96 


914.8 M46 


914 A28 


917.44 N97 


910 084 


917.8 P41 


915 P87 



LITERATURE, ESSAYS AND POETRY 

Crowther, M. O. Book of letters. 
*Colvin, Sir Sidney. Memories and notes. 

Davis, Owen. Icebound. 

Eaton, W. P. Penguin persons and peppermints. 
*Freeman, R. M. The new Boswell. 

Hill, C. M. ed. The world's great religious poetry. 

Jenison, Madge. The Sunwise turn. 

Klickmann, Flora. Lure of the pen. 
*Leacock, Stephen. Over the footlights. 
*Lucas, E. V. Adventures and enthusiasms. 
*Morley, Christopher. Inward ho! 

Mosher, M. D. comp. More toasts. 
*Overton, Grant. American nights entertainment. 

Page, W. H. A publisher's confession. 
*Pain, Barry. If winter don't. 

Pollock, Channing. The fool, a play. 

Robinson, M. L. Juvenile story writing. 

Sedgwick, H. D. Pro vita monastica. 

Sharp, D. L. The magical chance. 

Shay, Frank, ed. Treasury of plays for women. 

Warner, F. L. Groups and couples. 

Webber and Hart. One-act plays for secondary schools. 

DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL 

Andrews, C. F. Old Morocco. 

Bacon, E. M. Boston, a guide book. 

Bechdolt, F. R. When the west was young. 

Blunden, Edmund. The Bonaventure. 

Bradley, M. H. On the gorilla trail. 

Brown, Irving. Days and nights on the gypsy trail. 

Bryce, James. Memories of travel. 

Burr, A. R. Alaska. 

Chesterton, G. K. What I saw in America. 

Enders, E. C. Swinging lanterns. 
*Feith, Jan. Modern Holland. 

Foster, H. L. Adventures of a tropical tramp. 

Foster, H. L. Beachcomber in the orient. 

Freeman, L. R. Down the Yellowstone. 

Greene, A. B. The lone winter. 
*Hungerford, Edward. Planning a trip abroad. 

Huntington, Ellsworth. Business geography. 

Lane, R. W. Peaks of Shala. 
*Lucas, E. V. Roving east and roving west. 

Medill, Robert. Norwegian towns and people. 

My unknown chum. 

Nutting, Wallace. Massachusetts beautiful. 
*Ossendowski, Ferdinand. Beasts, men and gods. 

Perkins, E. B. The white heart of Mojave. 

Powell, E. A. By camel and car to the peacock throne. 

135 



917.29 R43 Rider, Fremont. Bermuda. 

916.6 S41 Schweitzer, Albert. On the edge of the primeval forest. 

916.2 S49 Seton, G. T. Woman tenderfoot in Egypt. 

919.8 S64 Smith, C. E. From the deep of the sea. 

919.8 S81 Stefansson, Vilhjalmur. Northward course of empire. 

917.16 T66 Towne, C. H. Ambling through Acadia. 



92 B457 
92 C942 
92 L633cha 
92 R674c 
92 C546 
92 G867 
92 H142 
92 H1851 
92 H186d 
92 H186h 
92 H186v 
92 A628 
92 H339h 
92 179 
92 K356 
92 K55 
92 P162 
928 P51 
92 P888 
92 R134v 
92 S912 
92 T382 
92 V274f 
92 B266w 
92 W637 
920.7 W69 



BIOGRAPHY 

Bernhardt, Sarah. Memories of my life. 
Bok, E. W. A man from Maine. 
Charnwood, Lord. Abraham Lincoln. 
Charnwood, Lord. Theodore Roosevelt. 
*Clark, F. E. Memories of many men in many lands. 
*Gresham, Matilda. Life of W. Q. Gresham. 2v. 
*Hall, G. S. Life and confessions of a psychologist. 
Hamilton, Ernest, Lord. Forty years on. 
Hamilton, Frederic, Lord. Days before yesterday. 
Hamilton, Frederic, Lord. Here, there and everywhere. 
Hamilton, Frederic, Lord. Vanished pomps of yesterday. 
*Harper, I. H. Life and work of Susan B. Anthony. 3v. 
Howe, P. P. Life of William Hazlitt. 
Ishii, Tokichi. A gentleman in prison 
Kenlon, John. Fourteen years a sailor. 
Kilmer, Joyce. Poems, essays and letters. 2v. 
Paine, R. D. Roads of adventure. 
Phelps, W. L. Some makers of American literature. 
Homesteader's portfolio 
S. Story of a varied life. 
Under four administrations. 

My experiences at Scotland Yard. 
Autobiography. 



Pratt, A. D. 
Rainsford, W. 
Straus, O. S. 
Thomson, Sir Basil. 
*Van Buren, Martin. 



Werner, M. R. Barnum. 

Wiggin, K. D. My garden of memory. 

Wilson, V. A. Queen Elizabeth's maids of honor. 



973.3 A21 
952 B77 
952 B81 
391 E12c 
954 F53 
952 G47 
947 H24 

917.4 H72 
974.4 M56 
932 N14 
971 S55 



HISTORY 

Adams, J. T. Revolutionary New England. 
Brinkley, Frank. History of the Japanese people. 
Brown A. J. Mastery of the far east. 
Earle, A. M. Costume of colonial days. 
Fisher, F. B. India's silent revolution. 
Gleason, George. What shall I think of Japan? 

Unfinished tales from a Russian prison. 
Woman's life in colonial days. 

Lowell — an industrial dream come true. 

Life and times of Tut-Ankh-Amen. 
Canada and its provinces. 23v. 



Harrison, M. E 
Holliday, Carl. 

*Meserve, H. C. 
Nahas, Bishara. 

*Shortt, Adam, ed 



136 



Abbott, Jane. 
Adams, Adeline. 
Armstrong, H. H. 
Arnim, M. A. B. 
Ashmun, Margaret. 
Ayscough, John. 
Bacheller, Irving. 
Bailey, Temple. 
Barres, Maurice. 
Beach, Rex. 
Bennett, Arnold. 
Benson, E. F. 
Benson, E. F. 
Beresford, J. D. 
Bindloss, Harold. 
Bindloss, Harold. 
Bojer, Johan. 
Bordeaux, Henry. 
Bottome, Phyllis. 
Bower, B. M. 
Brown, Alice. 
Brown, Alice. 
Buchan, John. 
Buchan, John. 
Buchan, John. 
Burr, A. R. 
Cadmus, pseud. 
Gather, Willa. 
Gather, Willa. 
Cather, Willa. 
Curwood, J. O. 
Curwood, J. O. 
Curwood, J. 0. 
Dehan, Richard. 
Delano, E. B. 
De la Pasture, E. E. M. 
De la Pasture, E. E. M. 
De la Roche, Mazo. 
Diver Maud. 
Evarts, H. G. 
Evarts, H. G. 
Fairbanks, J. A. 
Farnol, Jeffery. 
Farnol, Jeffery. 
Farnol, Jeffery. 
Ferguson, John 
Fisher, D. C. 
Flandrau, G. H. 
Fletcher, J. S. 
Fletcher, J. S. 



FICTION 

Minglestreams. 
*The Amouretta landscape, etc. 

For richer, for poorer. 

The enchanted April. 

Support. 

Dobachi. 

The Scudders. 

The dim lantern. 
*Colette Baudoche. 

Flowing gold. 

Riceyman Steps. 
* Across the stream. 

Miss Mapp. 

Prisoners of Hartling. 

The bush-rancher. 

Lister's great adventure. 

Last of the vikings. 

The house that died. 

The victim and the worm. 

The voice at Johnnywater. 

Old Crow. 

Wind between the worlds. 

Huntingtower. 

Midwinter. 

Watcher by the threshold. 

The wrong move. 
*Island of sheep. 

A lost lady. 

One of ours. 

Youth and the bright Medusa. 

The Alaskan. 

The country beyond. 

The river's end. 

The just steward. 

Land of content. 
*The optimist. 
*A reversion to type. 

Explorers of the dawn. 

The strong hours. 

Tumbleweeds. 

The yellow horde. 

The Cortlandts of Washington Square. 

The definite object. 

My lady Caprice. 

Peregrine's progress. 

*The dark Geraldine. 

*Raw material. 
Being respectable. 

Charing Cross mystery. 
Exterior to the evidence. 



137 



Forman, H. J. 
Fuller, Margaret. 
Furman, Lucy. 
Gale, Zona. 
Galsworthy, John. 
Galsworthy, John. 
Galsworthy, John. 
Gartland, Hannah. 
Gerould, K. F. 
Gerould, K. F. 
Gilman, D. F. 
Green, A. K. 
Grenfell, W. T. 
Grey, Zane. 
Grey, Zane. 
Hannay, James. 
Harker, L. A. 
Harris, Corra. 
Hawes, C. B. 
Hay, Ian, pseud. 
Hext, Harrington. 
Jones, E. B. C. 
Kaye-Smith, Sheila. 
Keith, Marian. 
King, Basil. 
King, Basil. 
Laing, Janet. 
Landon, Herman. 
LeBlanc, Maurice. 
Lee, Jennette. 
Leverage, Henry. 
Lincoln, J. C. 
Lowndes, Mrs. Belloc. 
Lowndes, Mrs. Belloc. 
Lucas, E. V. 
Lutz, G. L. H. 
Lutz, G. L. H. 
Lutz, G. L. H. 
McCutcheon, G. B. 
McFee, William. 
Mackenzie, Compton. 
Mansfield, Katherine. 
Marquand, J. P. 
Marshall, Archibald. 
Marshall, Archibald. 
Marshall, Edison. 
Marshall, Edison. 
Martin, Absalom. 
Martin, H. R. 
Maxwell, W. B. 
Maxwell, W. B. 
Maxwell, W. B. 



Man who lived in a shoe. 

One world at a time. 

The quare women. 

Faint perfume. 
*Captures. 

The country house 

The man of property. 

The Globe Hollow mystery. 

The great tradition. 

Valiant dust. 

Lorraine. 

The step on the stair. 

Northern neighbors. 

Light of western stars. 
* Wanderer of the wasteland. 

The great-grandmother. 

Really romantic age. 

Daughter of Adam. 

The dark frigate. 

The lucky number. 

The thing at their heels. 

The Wedgwood medallion. 

End of the house of Alard. 

Bells of St. Stephen's. 

The dust-flower. 

The happy isles. 

Man with the lamp. 
*Gray terror. 
*Woman of mystery. 

Mysterious office. 

The white cipher. 

Doctor Nye. 

From out the vasty deep. 

What Timmy did. 

Genevra's money. 

The big blue soldier. 

The search. 

Tomorrow about this time. 

Oliver October. 

Command. 

Seven ages of women. 

The garden party, etc. 

The unspeakable gentleman. 

The Clinton twins, etc. 

Pippin. 

Isle of retribution. 

Voice of the pack. 

Kastle Krags. 

Church on the avenue. 

The day's journey. 
*The guarded flame. 

Spinster of this parish. 



138 



Milne, A. A. 
Mitchell, R. C. 
Montgomery, L. M. 
Morley, Christopher. 
Morris, E. B. 
Norris, Kathleen. 
Norris, Kathleen. 
O'Brien, H. V. 
Ollivant, Alfred. 
Olmstead, Florence. 
Onions, Mrs. Oliver. 
Onions, Mrs. Oliver. 
Oppenheim, E. P. 
Oppenheim, E. P. 
Payne, E. S. 
Pendexter, Hugh. 
Phillpotts, Eden. 
Poole, E. A. 
Prouty, O. H. 
Pryde, Anthony. 
Quick, Herbert. 
Ragsdale, Lulah. 
Raine, W. M. 
Reynolds, Mrs. Baillie. 
Reynolds, Mrs. Baillie. 
Richards, Mrs. L. E. H. 
Richmond, G. L. S. 
Roberts, Cecil. 
Rohmer, Sax. 
Rowland, H. C. 
Russell, John. 
Sawyer, Ruth. 
Sidgwick, Mrs. Alfred. 
Simon, R. A. 
Singmaster, Elsie. 
Slade, C. J. 
Snaith, J. C. 
Spearman, F. H. 
Stanford, A. B. 
Sterrett, F. R. 
Stockley, Cynthia. 
Tarkington, Booth. 
Thompson, Vance. 
Tilden, Freeman. 
Vance, L. J. 
Walpole, Hugh. 
Wells, Carolyn. 
Wells, Carolyn. 
Wells, H. G. 
Wharton, Edith. 
Widdemer, Margaret. 
Widdemer, Margaret. 



Once upon a time. 

Corduroy. 

Emily of New Moon. 

Where the blue begins. 

Our Miss York. 

Butterfly. 
-Josselyn's wife. 

Trodden gold. 

"Old For-ever." 

Madame Valcour's lodger. 

Bridge of kisses. 

Sir or Madam. 

Cinema murder. 

The seven conundrums. 

Fathoms deep. 

Pay gravel. 

The Red Redmaynes. 

Millions. 

Stella Dallas. 

Clair de lune. 

The hawkeye. 

The next-besters. 

Brand blotters. 

Judgment of Charis. 

The lonely stronghold. 

In blessed Cyrus. 

Rufus. 

Scissors. 
Tales of China-town. 

Hirondelle. 

Where the pavement ends. 

Gladiola Murphy. 
*Iron cousins. 

"Our little girl." 

The hidden road. 
*The cuckoo's nest. 
The great age. 

Laramie holds the range. 

The ground swell. 

Mary Rose of Mifflin. 

Ponjola. 

The fascinating stranger, etc. 

The pointed tower. 

Mr. Podd. 
The lone wolf returns. 

Jeremy and Hamlet. 

Feathers left around. 
*Spooky Hollow. 

Men like gods. 
*A son at the front. 

A minister of grace. 

You're young only once. 

139 



Williams, W. W. 
Wilson, H. L. 
Wilson, H. L. 
Wilson, Margaret. 
Wodenhouse, P. G. 
Wyatt E. F. 



Family. 

Ma Pettingill. 

Oh, doctor! 

The able McLaughlins. 

Mostly Sally. 

The invisible gods. 



CHILDREN'S BOOKS— NON-FICTION 

680 B33 Baxter, L. H. Toy craft. 

599 B34j Baynes, E. H. Jimmie, the story of a black bear cub. 

599 B34p Baynes, E. H. Polaris, an Esquimaux dog. 

920 B38 Beard A. E. S. Our foreign-born citizens. 

398.4 B46 Beston, H. B. The starlight wonder book. 

398.4 B67e Bowen, William. The enchanted forest. 

927.8 B81 Brower, Hariette. Story-lives of master musicians. 
940 B85 Buchan, John. Book of escapes and hurried journeys. 
670 C35 Chamberlain, J. F. How we are clothed. 

630 C35 Chamberlain, J. F. How we are fed. 

627.9 C69 Collins, F. A. Sentinels along our coast. 

398.4 C72c Colum, Padraic. Children who followed the piper. 

573 D72h Dopp, K. E. The early herdsmen. 

398.4 D98i Dyer, R. O. Adventures of the ink spots. 

395 F93 Everyday manners for boys and girls. 

593 G25 Gaylord, I. N. Little sea-folk. 

680 H14ho Hall, A. N. Home-made games and equipment. 

913.3 H14 Hall, Jennie. Buried cities. 

914 H49 Hewins, CM. A traveler's letters to boys and girls. 

398.2 H69 Holbrook, Florence, comp. Book of nature myths. 

92 W272j Jackson, W. C. Boys' life of Booker T. Washington. 

523 J62 Johnson, Gaylord. The sky movies. 

232.9 R44 Rihbany, A. M. The Christ story for boys and girls. 

353 S54 Shepherd, W. G. Boys' own book of politics. 

342.7 T16 Tappan, E. M. Story of our constitution. 

808.9 W63 Wickes, F. G. comp. Happy holidays. 



Abbott, Jacob. 
Abbott, J. D. 
Adams, Katherine. 
Adams, Katherine. 
Bassett, S. W. 
Bennett, E. H. 
Brown, E. A. 
Chesnez, Baroness des. 
Dudley, A. T. 
Gollomb, Joseph. 
Gray, Joslyn. 
Guyol, L. H. 
Hartley, G. I. 



STORIES FOR CHILDREN 

Franconia stories. 

Larkspur. 

Mehitable. 

Wisp — a girl of Dublin. 

Walter and the wireless. 

Camp Ken-jockety. 

Whistling Rock. 

Lady Green Satin and her maid Rosette. 

The king's powder. 

Working through at Lincoln High. 

The other Miller girl. 

The funny house. 

The last parrakeet. 

140 



Hawkes, Clarence. 
Hewes, A. D. 
Hume, Ethel. 
Ives, S. N. 
Kipling, Rudyard. 
Lofting, Hugh. 
Loomis, A. F. > • 
Marshall, Archibald. 
Mukerji, D. G. 
Newberry, Perry. 
Perkins, L. F. 
Phillips, E. C. 
Spyri, Johanna. 
Tappan, E. M. 
With, K. H. 
Zwilgmeyer, Dikken. 



Dapples of the circus. 

Boy of the lost crusade. 

Judy of York Hill. 

Dog heroes of many lands. 

Land and sea tales. 

Doctor Dolittle's postoffice. 

The Sea Bird's quest. 

Audacious Ann. 

Kari the elephant. 

Black boulder claim. 

The Filipino twins. 

A story of Nancy Hanks. 

Vinzi. 

Ella. 

The mouse story. 

Four cousins. 



141 



REPORT OF CUSTODIAN 
JOHN CORNELL ART GALLERY 



To the Trustees of the Memorial Hall Library. 

Gentlemen: I herewith submit the report of the gallery for the 
twelve months ending December 31, 1923. 

The attendance for the year has been somewhat in advance of 
that of recent years, 300 visitors being listed, of which 130 were 
adults and 170 children. 

There have been few instances in which the parents have 
accompanied the children. One regrets this much. No doubt 
many are too busy or tired to make the effort. It is a distinct 
pleasure to all when such visits occur. 

The desire has been expressed before that more adults could 
experience the genuine satisfaction attending a call at the gallery, 
— a real call, not a perfunctory glance. Even a half-hour spent 
in such a restful atmosphere is conducive to refreshment of 
spirit. It is only just to record, and one is glad to do so, that a 
careless attitude towards the pictures is not a common occur- 
rence. The type of person who "gallops through the Louvre" 
rarely calls at the gallery. 

Occasional remarks from callers indicate that many persons in 
town are cherishing the hope that the time is not too far away 
when they can frequently and easily drop in to enjoy the pic- 
tures. It sounds good. 

The small attendance of the children is regretted. Of course 
the majority are new comers, and eager to explore. The interest 
of some is quickly satisfied, while others tarry, ask questions, and 
come again. The wide range of pictures makes an alluring 
combination, and the children love them. One expects the 
pictures with a story to attract them — when will any one be too 
old to enjoy a compelling story? — but many are drawn to the 

142 



portraits, and of course to the few but choice landscapes and 
marines. Some enjoy studying textures. It is interesting to 
observe them, and most encouraging. 

The gallery has surely been of great value to many children as 
well as adults. Taken all in all, one can report that it is function- 
ing, even if results appear negligible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ABBIE S. DAVIS 

Custodian 



143 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL 
REPORT 



OF THE 



Board of Public Works 



EMBRACING THE THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF 
WATER COMMISSIONERS AND TWENTY- 
SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT OF 
SEWER COMMISSIONERS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1923 



ANDOVER, MASS. 

THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1924 



*JOHN H. FLINT 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

|g39 1899 

♦JAMES P. BUTTERFIELD 
♦FELIX G. HAYNES 

SEWER COMMISSIONERS 



1893—1894 

♦WM. S. JENKINS 
♦JOHN L. SMITH 
CHARLES E. ABBOTT 



1894—1899 

♦WM. S. JENKINS 
♦JOHN L. SMITH 
♦JOHN E. SMITH 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



1899—1902 

♦JOHN H. FLINT 
♦WM. S. JENKINS 
♦JOHN L. SMITH 
♦JAMES P. BUTTERFIELD 
♦FELIX G. HAYNES 

1906—1907 

♦FELIX G. HAYNES 
♦JOHN W. BELL, Treas. 
JAMES C. SAWYER, Sec'y 
♦LEWIS T. HARDY 
♦HARRY M. EAMES 

1908—1912 

♦LEWIS T. HARDY 
♦JOHN W. BELL, Treas. 
JAMES C. SAWYER, Sec'y 
ANDREW McTERNEN 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS 

1914—1916 

THOS. E. RHODES ('19) 
BARNETT ROGERS ('16) 
♦LEWIS T. HARDY ('16) 
ANDREW McTERNEN, Sec'y ('18) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas. ('18) 

1917—1918 

BARNETT ROGERS ('19) 
THOS. E. RHODES ('20) 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('18) 
CHAS. B. BALDWIN, Sec'y ('19) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas. ('18) 

1919-1920-1921 
ARNETT ROGERS ('22) 
WILLIAM D. McINTYRE ('21) 
ARTHUR T. BOUTWELL ('22) 
PHILIP L. HARDY Sec'y ('21) 
THOS. E. RHODES, Treas. ('23) 



1903—1906 

♦JOHN L. SMITH 
♦FELIX G. HAYNES 
♦JOHN W. BELL 
♦LEWIS T. HARDY 
JAMES C. SAWYER 

1907—1908 

♦FELIX G. HAYNES 
♦JOHN W. BELL, Treas. 
JAMES C. SAWYER, Sec'y 
♦LEWIS T. HARDY 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

1913—1914 

♦LEWIS T. HARDY ('16) 
BARNETT R(*GERS ('16) 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('15) 
THOS. E. RHODES, Sec'y ('14) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS, Treas.(15) 

1916—1917 

BARNETT ROGERS ('19) 
THOS. E. RHODES ('17) 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('18) 
CHAS. B. BALDWIN, Sec'y ('19) 
WILLIS B. HODGKINS,Treas.('18) 

1918—1919 

BARNETT ROGERS ('22) 
ANDREW McTERNEN ('21) 
PHILIP L. HARDY ('21) 
CHAS. B. BALDWIN, Sec'y ('22) 
THOS. E. RHODES, Treas. ('20) 
1922 
THOMAS E. RHODES ('23) 
PHILIP L. HARDY ('24) 
WM. D. McINTYRE, Treas. ('24) 
ARTHUR T. BOUTWELL ('25) 
EDWARD SHATTUCK ('25) 



1923 
PHILIP L. HARDY (»24) 
WM. D. McINTYRE, Sec. ('24) 
ARTHUR T. BOUTWELL, Treas. ('25) 
EDWARD SHATTUCK ('25) 
WALTER I. MORSE ('26) 

SUPERINTENDENT 

FRANK L. COLE 



* Deceased. 



REPORT OF 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



To the Citizens of the Town of Andover, Mass.: 

Your Board of Public Works herewith submits its annual report 
for the year ending December 31, 1923. 

This is the eleventh annual report of the Board under its re- 
organization, and includes the twenty-seventh annual report of 
the Sewer System, the thirty-fifth of the Water System, and the 
eleventh of the Highway and Park Departments, since they 
have been under the jurisdiction of the Board of Public Works. 

Organization 

Mr. Walter I. Morse was elected to the Board for the term of 
three years. The Board met on March 12, 1923, and organized 
as follows: Chairman, Philip L. Hardy; Secretary, William D. 
Mclntyre; Treasurer, Arthur T. Boutwell. Mr. Frank L. Cole 
was appointed superintendent for one year and Mr. George Dick 
as his assistant. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

During the past year there has been added to the Water 
System, fourteen thousand two hundred nineteen feet (14,219 ft.) 
of 6-inch and 8-inch cast-iron pipe; also twenty-one (21) hy- 
drants, together with fifty (50) gates. A detailed account of this 
work will be found in the superintendent's report. 

With the above extensions, our water mains now total fifty- 
seven and eighty-four hundredths (57.84) miles, with four 
hundred and sixty-two (462) hydrants. A thorough inspection 
has been made of all hydrants with relation to their working 
conditions, and a pressure test taken of same. We feel from the 
results of this inspection, and after talking over the matter with 
insurance authorities, that both the supply and the pressure of 

3 



the water system is highly satisfactory, and with proper care 
taken in opening and closing the hydrants, we feel each unit 
should function 100% efficient. 

This department has now as a part of its equipment a mana- 
graph which can be used as a measuring device, also to check 
up the efficiency of the pumps as well as to show the presence 
of any large leaks in our water mains. 

A contract has been awarded to the Lawrence Pump and 
Machine Co., Lawrence, Mass., to install an electrical pump at 
the Pumping Station. This pump will be ready to use about 
April 1st. This unit will pump about 30% more water than 
the present steam plant, and we have every reason to believe, 
with the electrical unit as the main operating force, with the 
steam plant as an auxiliary, your pumping plant is equipped to 
meet any emergency. This has been the record year for pump- 
ing, three hundred and thirty- two million (332,000,000) gallons 
being pumped, adding six thousand dollars ($6,000.00) more 
to the water receipts than last year. 

It is a plan of the Board to grade around and put in a more 
presentable condition, the grounds around the pumping station; 
also to fence in a certain portion of the pond each year. 

The Board would recommend the sum of thirty-three thousand 
five hundred dollars ($33,500.00) for maintenance of the Water 
Department for the ensuing year; also the sum of fifteen thou- 
sand dollars ($15,000.00) to be used for construction expense 
and service pipes. The reason for asking the additional twelve 
thousand five hundred dollars ($12,500.00) for construction 
expense and service pipe is, that we heretofore had the use of 
all credits from this class of work. This system, however, has 
been discontinued and all credits must be turned in to the Town 
Treasury. A detailed account of the estimated expenditures of 
the maintenance of the Water Department will be found in the 
Superintendent's report. 

The Water Bonded Debt 

The bonded debt of the Water System, January 1, 1923, was 
one hundred and thirty-one thousand dollars ($131,000.00). 
During the year 1923 there was paid twenty thousand dollars 
($20,000.00), leaving on the bonded debt system a balance of 



one hundred eleven thousand dollars ($111,000.00). Of this 
indebtedness, twenty thousand dollars ($20,000.00) is redeem- 
able by the sinking fund, which on January 1, 1924, amounted 
to nineteen thousand, one hundred and twenty-six dollars, and 
sixty-nine cents ($19,126.69). No further appropriations for 
this fund will be necessary, as the interest on the amount on 
deposit will meet the sum required through interest when due. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

The principal work done in this department this year was the 
building of the Outfall Sewer to the Merrimack River. We 
present you below a summarized report as presented to us by 
the firm of Weston & Sampson, engineers. 

Feb. 1, 1924 
Board of Public Works, 

Town of Andover, Mass. 
Gentlemen : 

We respectfully present the following progress report on the 
construction of the outfall sewer to the Merrimack River to 
January 1, 1924. 

Preliminary 

Following our report of January 29, 1923, on the best method 
of sewage disposal for the Town of Andover, your Board caused 
an article to be inserted in the Town Warrant asking for a bond 
issue of $150,000 for the construction of an outfall sewer to the 
Merrimack River, which was voted. 

A bill was then filed with the Legislature and referred to the 
Committee on Finance. After two hearings at which the various 
parties interested were represented, the bill was approved on 
February 26, 1923, under Chapter 69, Acts of 1923, as follows: 

"An Act Authorizing the Town of Andover to Construct an 
< Outfall Sewer for the Disposal of Its Sewage. 11 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. For the purpose of disposing of the sewage 
and manufacturing wastes of the Town of Andover, said 

5 



town may lay out, construct and maintain an outfall sewer 
with an outlet into the Merrimack River, and for the afore- 
said purpose may take by eminent domain under chapter 
seventy-nine of the General Laws, or acquire by purchase or 
otherwise, such lands, water rights, rights of way and ease- 
ments in said town as may be deemed necessary for the 
establishment of such system of sewage disposal and for any 
connections therewith, and may so take or acquire a strip of 
land of such width as may be deemed necessary on the 
westerly side of the Shawsheen river extending from the 
boundary of said town through a portion of the city of Law- 
rence to said Merrimack river. For the aforesaid purpose, 
said town may lay sewers through private and other lands 
and under any way or railroad, and for the aforesaid purpose 
or for repairing such sewers, may enter upon and dig up such 
private and other lands, ways or railroads in such manner 
as not unnecessarily to obstruct the same; provided, that 
said town shall not do any of the aforesaid work within the 
location of any railroad corporation except at such time and 
in such manner as it may agree upon with such corporation, 
or, in case of failure so to agree, as may be approved by the 
department of public utilities. Said town shall leave any way 
so dug up in the city of Lawrence in a condition satisfactory 
to the city engineer of said city. 

Section 2. No act shall be done under authority of the 
preceding section until plans of said outfall sewer with an 
outlet into the Merrimack river shall have been approved by 
the department of public health of the commonwealth, and 
no lands, water rights, rights of way, or easements outside 
the boundaries of the town of Andover shall be taken or 
acquired by said town until approved by the said depart- 
ment after notice to the cities and towns affected by said 
acquisition or taking and a public hearing by said depart- 
ment to all parties interested. 

Section 3. Any person injured in his property by any 
action of said town under this act may recover damages 
from said town under said chapter seventy-nine. 

Section 4. For the purpose of paying the necessary ex- 
penses and liabilities incurred under this act, said town may 



from time to time borrow such sums as may be necessary not 
exceeding, in the aggregate, one hundred and fifty thousand 
dollars, and may issue bonds or notes therefor, which shall 
bear on their face the words, And over Sewer Loan, Act of 
1923. Each authorized issue shall constitute a separate loan. 
Indebtedness under this act shall be in excess of the statu- 
tory limit, but shall, except as provided herein, be subject to 
chapter forty-four of the General Laws. 

Section 5. This act shall take effect upon its passage, but 
no expenditure shall be made and no liability incurred there- 
under unless said act shall first be accepted by vote of two 
thirds of the legal voters of the town of Andover present and 
voting thereon at a legal meeting called for that purpose 
within three years from the date of its passage. 

Approved February 26, 1923 
As provided in the bill, a hearing was held before the Depart- 
ment of Public Health on June 1, 1923, and the plans of the 
outfall sewer, the outlet into the Merrimack River and the taking 
of the necessary rights of way as proposed were approved by the 
Department. 

In addition, a petition to construct and maintain an outlet in 
the Merrimack River, as proposed, was presented to the Massa- 
chusetts Department of Public Works and approved August 30. 
Another petition to the United States War Department, also to 
construct and maintain the outlet in the Merrimack River, was 
granted on October 4, 1923. 

Plans, Specifications and Proposals 

In the meantime we had prepared contract drawings and 

specifications, and on June 2, the following proposals for the 

construction of the outfall sewer were received and opened: 

Contract Amount 

Cenedella and Company $68,355.50 

Louis Cyr 79,788.50 

George M. Byrne Company 87,247 . 00 

John Williams and Company 87,617 . 00 

Vicenza Grande 107,906 . 00 

John E. Palmer Company 113,402 . 00 

Frank Drinkwater 134,752 . 50 



All of the proposals were based upon unit prices for the various 
items of the work, and the above figures are the totals of the bids 
as computed from the estimated quantities. The contract was 
awarded to the lowest bidder, Cenedella and Company of Mil- 
ford, Mass., on the following basis: 







Estimated 


Unit 






Item 


Quantity 


Price 


Total 


1- 


-a Earth Excavation, 0-8 ft. 


13,750 cu. yd. 


$2.15 


$29562.50 




b " " 8-12 ft. 


1,750 " 


3.00 


5250.00 




c " " 12-16 ft. 


525 " 


3.50 


1837.50 




d " " 16-20 ft. 


725 " 


3.50 


2537.50 




e " " 20-24 ft. 


60 " 


10.00 


600.00 




f " " 24-28 ft. 


12 " 


20.00 


240.00 


2 


Earth Fill and Embankment 


1,050 " 


2.00 


2100.00 


3 


Rock Excavation 


900 " 


5.00 


4500.00 


4 


Concrete Masonry 


75 " 


35.00 


2625.00 


5 


Steel Reinforcement 


3,000 lbs. 


0.15 


450.00 


6 


Brick Masonry 


70 cu. yd. 


40.00 


2800.00 


7- 


-a Laying and Jointing 18" C.I. P. 


1,240 lin. ft. 


0.75 


930.00 




b " " " 24" " 


7,160 " " 


1.40 


10024.00 




c " " " 24"Vit. P. 


725 " " 


0.40 


290.00 




d " " " 30" " 


3,985 " " 


1.00 


3985.00 


8 


Setting M.H. Frames and Covers 19 


6.00 


114.00 


9 


Iron Steps for Manholes 


110 


1.00 


110.00 


10 


Extra Work 


+ 15 






11 


Lumber Left in Place 


10M.B.M. 


40.00 


400.00 


$68355.50 



Low Level Sewer 

The City of Lawrence being desirous of providing for the 
domestic sewage from an undeveloped residential area of about 
100 acres, lying south of Boxford Street and east of South Union 
Street, and at an elevation too low to be served by the Osgood 
Street sewer without pumping, then entered into negotiations 
with the town of Andover which called for a low-level sewer to 
be constructed beginning at a drop manhole just north of the 
Essex Company stone culvert on Crawford Street, following 
along the Shawsheen River and entering the Merrimack River 
on land of the Brightwood Manufacturing Company. An 
agreement was reached whereby the Town of Andover was to 
construct this low-level sewer and the City of Lawrence agreed 
to reimburse the Town for the excess cost of the low-level sewer 

8 



over the cost of the sewer originally proposed, estimated to be 
about $45,000. 

Inasmuch as the approval of the location of the outfall sewer 
and outlet into the Merrimack River by the Department of 
Health was based on the original location, following along 
Crawford Street, Shawsheen Road, East Street, Market Street, 
and on private property across Portland Street, the Boston and 
Maine Railroad, Merrimack Street and along the private way 
of the Pacific Mills adjoining the American Woolen Company's 
storehouse to the river, it was necessary for the Department to 
hold another hearing, which was done July 10, and the low-level 
sewer was approved by the Department. 

It was then necessary to revise the contract plans and to enter 
into another contract for the construction of that portion of the 
original contract which was affected by the change in location of 
the sewer. This work was awarded to Cenedella and Company 
at the same unit prices as the first contract except for certain 
items which were necessarily affected by the change. 

Description 

The accompanying general plan shows the location of theoutfall 
sewer as built from the pumping station to the Merrimack River. 
The sewer consists of an 18-inch and 24-inch cast-iron force main 
from the pumping station to Chickering Street, 30-inch double 
strength vitrified tile from Chickering Street to the Merrimack 
River, and 24-inch cast-iron for the outlet into the river. 

The cast-iron pipe is laid with "Leadite" joints, and the tile 
pipe with jute and cement mortar joints. An air and vacuum 
valve is provided at a summit north of the Boston and Maine 
Railroad on land of the American Woolen Company, and an 
emergency blow-off and drain into a brook at a low point, also 
on land of the American Woolen Company. The manholes on 
the gravity section are of brick, 5 feet inches diameter, with 
iron steps and standard heavy-weight manhole frames and 
covers. Connections for the City of Lawrence sewers have been 
provided at Chickering Street, the drop manhole on Crawford 
Street, Boxford Street extended and Andover Street extended. 

The total length of the outfall sewer is 14,325.80 feet, divided 
as follows: 

10 



18" C. I. pipe from the Y branch at the pumping 

ing 'station to the 20" American Woolen Co. 

connection, 1,230.02 ft. 

24" C. I. pipe from the American Woolen Co. 

connection to the Andover-Lawrence line, 1,726.93 ft. 
24" C. I. pipe from the Andover-Lawrence line 

to Chickering Street, 3,559.00 ft. 

30" vitrified tile from Chickering Street to the 

outlet manhole at the Merrimack River, 7,458.85 ft. 

24" C. I. from the outlet manhole to the end of 

the outlet in the Merrimack River, 351.00 ft. 

Purchase of Materials 

In order to expedite the work and to take advantage of favor- 
able prices for materials, your Board purchased and delivered 
along the line of the sewer all C. I. pipe, gate valves, special 
castings, vitrified tile pipe and manhole frames and covers. This 
proved to be decidedly advantageous as the price of C. I. pipe 
advanced several dollars per ton even before the contract bids 
were received, thus saving approximately $10,000 to the Town 
of Andover, and due to congested conditions in the cast-iron pipe 
foundries and among vitrified tile manufacturers, the work would 
have been greatly delayed had the furnishing of pipe been in- 
cluded in the contract. The unloading, hauling and delivering 
of the pipe along the sewer was awarded to J. F. McDonough of 
Andover. 

Construction 

The contractor began work on June 25 and favored by a very 
dry summer with moderate temperatures and an equally dry 
fall and winter, with mild weather, rapid progress was made so 
that at the end of the year there remained only the final con- 
nections at the pumping station in Shawsheen Village and the 
connections near the settling tank at the filtration plant to divert 
the high-level sewage into the outfall sewer through the 12-inch 
C. I. pipe originally intended to connect the pumping station 
with the filtration plant. 

The following monthly estimates under the contract were pre- 
sented to your Board during the year 1923 : 

11 



r onth 


1st Contract 


2nd Contract 


Total 


July 


$7,607.50 


$3,153.71 


$10,761.21 


August 


9,417.58 


14,630.41 


24,047.99 


September 


8,323.62 


14,023.90 


22,347.52 


October 


6,260.46 


14,333.55 


20,594.01 



Total $31,609.16 $46,141.57 $77,750.73 

We will submit a final report on the outfall sewer upon its 
completion. The total cost of the sewer when completed will 
be several thousand dollars less than estimated. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Weston & Sampson 

When this new system of sewage disposal is in operation, we 
would recommend the sale of the present filter beds; they having 
outlived their usefulness to us, and we have inserted an article 
in the Warrant to that effect. 

We would recommend for maintenance of sewer six thousand 
dollars ($6,000.00) for the ensuing year. 

The Sewer Bonded Debt 

The bonded debt of the Sewer System, January 1, 1923, was 
one hundred six thousand dollars ($106,000.00). During the 
year seven thousand dollars ($7,000.00) was paid from the Town 
Treasury on this indebtedness. Consequent to the building of 
the outfall sewer, there has been added one hundred fifty thou- 
sand dollars ($150,000.00) to this amount, making the total 
bonded debt on this system, January 1, 1924, two hundred forty- 
nine thousand dollars ($249,000.00). Of this amount, thirty 
thousand dollars ($30,000.00) is redeemable by the sinking fund, 
which on January 1, 1924, amounted to twenty-five thousand 
fifty-seven dollars and seventy-six cents ($25,057.76). The 
sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) should be appropriated 
for the sinking fund for the year 1924. 

PARK DEPARTMENT 

The sum of eighteen hundred dollars ($1,800.00) is recommend- 
ed for the maintenance of the Park Department for the ensuing 

12 



year. This is six hundred dollars ($600.00) greater than the 
amount asked for last year. The cause for the additional amount 
asked for is the purchase of a power lawn-mower, and the grad- 
ing of the so-called Cunningham property. 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Under the maintenance appropriation the usual work was done 
during the year 1923 as follows: gutters and catchbasins were 
cleaned out, roads patched and repaired, and the tarvia roads 
blanketed where necessary. 

The snowfall of last winter was one of the heaviest in years, 
making it almost impossible to keep the walks and roads open 
to travel. This winter we are better equipped to meet this 
situation, having a State truck equipped with a plough, as well 
as three Town trucks with the equipment for attaching ploughs 
whenever occasion should warrant. 

Under construction the following streets were rebuilt: Shaw- 
sheen Road, Haverhill Street, Main Street; and William Street 
re-surfaced. Main Street was rebuilt from the Shawsheen River 
to the Lawrence line, and is of the reinforced cement type, the 
entire work being done under the supervision of the State High- 
way Division. The Town and the American Woolen Company 
paid equally fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000.00) towards this 
work. The total cost of this job was one hundred eighteen 
thousand, four hundred fifty-one dollars and twenty-five cents 
($118,451.25). The progress on this job was slow, and great 
inconvenience was felt during the period of construction; how- 
ever, we feel this is a very satisfactory piece of work. 

At a special town meeting held on September 17, the sum of 
thirty thousand dollars ($30,000.00) was appropriated to re- 
build Haverhill Street. Bids were asked for, and the contract 
was awarded to T. G. Jewett, Jr., of New Bedford; this 
road is also of reinforced cement type. The job was started at 
once, and completed on November 14, at a cost of thirty-seven 
thousand, four hundred five dollars and twenty-six cents 
($37,405.26). The County paid forty-nine hundred dollars 
($4,900.00), the State eight thousand dollars ($8,000.00), and the 
Town twenty-four thousand, five hundred five dollars and twenty- 

13 



six cents ($24,505 . 26) toward this work. Due to the very efficient 
work of the contractor, together with the favorable weather 
conditions, the work was not only completed well within the 
specified time, but a balance of five thousand, four hundred 
ninety-four dollars and seventy- four cents ($5,494.74) was 
turned back into the Town Treasury. 

The partial building of Shawsheen Road, jointly with M. 
McDonough & Co., of Swampscott, will when completed open 
another main artery from Andover center to Lowell. The com- 
pletion of this work, which is about seven thousand (7,000) 
yards, is part of the proposed work this year. The re-surfacing 
of William Street was a necessary factor in our construction work, 
as we felt any delay on this thoroughfare might be a costly one 
to the Town, it being of a more expensive grade of construction 
than many of our other streets. The detailed account of the 
work on both Shawsheen Road and William Street will be found 
in the superintendent's report. 

We have received numerous communications from the Lowell 
Post Office authorities relative to the very unsatisfactory roads 
in West Andover they are called upon to use. The most recent 
communication advised us that unless better roads could be 
furnished in that district, they may be compelled to discontinue 
this rural route. We have repaired many of these roads with 
ashes this winter, and anticipate caring for many more in the 
spring. 

The Board feels from the continued demands for better roads 
in the various sections of Town, and with increased traffic going 
over our roads, that the appropriation for the Highway Depart- 
ment should be increased instead of decreased, and would ac- 
cordingly recommend the appropriation of eighty-five thousand 
dollars ($85,000.00) for the Highway Department for the ensuing 
year,, forty thousand dollars ($40,000.00) of this for new con- 
struction, and forty-five thousand dollars ($45,000.00) for main- 
tenance. 

Roger's Brook 

At a special Town meeting held on June 12, twenty-five 
hundred dollars ($2,500.00) was voted for the purpose of elimin- 
ating the overflow of Roger's Brook. A survey of the brook was 

14 



made from Morton Street to Lupine Road, from which the 
trouble was found to be between the center of the Park and 
Bartlet Street. The grade of the brook between these points was 
found high, especially between Chestnut Street and Bartlet 
Street. It was also found that the willow tree in the rear of Mr. 
Nuckley's residence considerably cut down the cross sectional 
area of the brook, and retarded the flow; this was removed. The 
brook was given a gradual slope from Chestnut to Bartlet Streets 
to facilitate the flow, and relieve the back pressure at the culvert; 
if this proves to be insufficient, it is planned to lay a 30-inch pipe 
around the culvert to increase the carrying capacity at this point. 
The walls along the north side of the brook running from Chest- 
nut Street were extended. From Whittier Court to Morton 
Street the abutters showed hearty cooperation by cleaning out 
that section of the brook which abutted their land. 

With this work completed it was thought best to delay the 
spending of any more money until we first had seen the results 
of what had already been done. We would accordingly ask for 
the unexpended balance on this appropriation. 

PHILIP L. HARDY 
EDWARD SHATTUCK 
ARTHUR T. BOUTWELL 
WALTER I. MORSE 
WILLIAM D. McINTYRE 



15 



REDEMPTION OF BONDS 



To redeem Water Loan 


No. 3 due 1923 


$ 10000. 00 




No. 4 due 1925 


15000.00 




No. 5 due 1928 


5000.00 


Water Sinking 


Fund 




Cr. 






Balance Jan. 1, 1923 


$27410.00 




Appropriation March, 1923 


750.00 




Interest on Deposit 


966.69 





Redemption of No. 3, 1923 



Andover National Bank 
Andover Savings Bank 



Dr. 



To redeem Sewer Bonds, due 1928 

Cr. 
Balance Jan. 1, 1923 
Appropriation March, 1923 
Interest on deposits 



29126 


69 






10000 


.00 










$19126 


69 


S 7495 


.67 






11631 


02 










$19126. 


69 






823005 . 


01 






1000 


00 






1052 


.75 










Q9^n>7 


7A 



25057.76 



Balance Jan. 1, 1924 

Dr. 
Sewer Loan Deposits 
Andover National Bank, Book No. 2 $25057.76 

Note: In addition to the above bonds we have $91,000.00 
Serial Water Bonds and $219,000.00 Serial Sewer Bonds. 

PHILIP L. HARDY 
WILLIAM D. McINTYRE 
ARTHUR T. BOUTEWLL 
EDWARD SHATTUCK 
W. I. MORSE 

Sinking Fund Commission 



Examined, Feb. 6, 1924 
W. H. Coleman 
J. S. Robertson 
H. Sellars 

Auditors 



Total Sinking Funds, $44,184.45 on deposit. Verified. 

16 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



To the Board of Public Works: 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit the thirty-fifth annual report of the 
Water Department, the twenty-seventh of the Sewer Depart- 
ment, and the eleventh of the Highway and Park Departments, 
together with a brief summary of the work preformed in each 
department for the year ending December 31, 1923. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

There has been added during the year 1923 to our main pipe 
lines 5040 feet of 6-inch C. I. pipe on Chandler Road at a cost 
of $10,228.83, or about $2.00 per foot, and 225 feet of 6-inch C. I. 
pipe on Carmel Street at a cost of $417.00 or $1.85 per foot. 
There have been laid by the Town in Shawsheen Village and 
paid for by the American Woolen Company, 7504 feet of 6-inch 
and 8-inch C. I. pipe. We have laid for Phillips Academy a 
6-inch main from Salem Street past the new administration 
building, connecting the main on Chapel Avenue, which makes 
a circulating line. On this line two hydrants were installed. 
There are now 57.84 miles of water main in town. The following 
table gives a list of the streets on which main water pipe was 
laid during the year 1923, also the length and size of the pipe 
and the number of hydrants and valves. 

Every hydrant has been examined, painted, oiled, greased, 
and packed; also pressures of many have been taken. The 
examination of these hydrants showed that there are 417 hy- 
drants belonging to the town and 45 on private property, making 
a total of 462. It also showed that all the hydrants were in good 
working condition with the exception of two. There were also a 
few that leaked through the waste but this did not prevent their 
use during a fire. Now that this work has been done, there 

17 



PIPES, HYDRANTS, AND VALVES 



Names of Streets 


Length of Pipe 


Size 


Hydrants 


Valves 


Chandler Road 


5040 ft. 


6" 


8 


12 


Carmel Street 


225 ft. 


6" 








Cassimere Street 


429 ft. 


6" 


1 


2 


Fletcher Street 


550 ft. 


6" 


1 


2 


Fletcher St. to Binney St. 


280 ft. 


6" 





2 


Binney St. 


550 ft. 


6" 


2 


4 


Shepley St. 


452 ft. 


6" 


1 


2 


Riverina Rd. 


244 ft. 


6" 





1 


Kensington St. 


220 ft. 


6" 





1 


Argyle St. 


425 ft. 


6" 





1 


William St. 


678 ft. 


8" 


1 


4 


Enmore St. 


493 ft. 


6" 





1 


Arundale St. 


649 ft. 


6" 


1 


2 


Ayer St. 


180 ft. 


6" 





1 


Kenilworth St. 


1079 ft. 


6" 


2 


5 


Tantallon Rd. 


831 ft. 


6" 


1 


2 


Tantallon Rd. to York St. 


300 ft. 


6" 


1 


2 


York St. 


94 ft. 


6" 





1 


Phillips Academy 


1500 ft. 


6" 


2 


5 


Total, 1923 


14219 




21 


50 



18 



should be no more trouble if proper care is taken in opening and 
closing the hydrants. The following pressures were taken in 
September when the pumps were running: — 

LOCAL AND STATIC PRESSURE OF SOME OF THE WATER 
HYDRANTS 

Abbot St. 

By Shorten 's house 80 lbs. 

By Wiss's house 65 

Andover St. 

By Ewing's house 90 

By Engine house 112 

By Abbott Homestead 100 

Argilla Rd. 

By Baker's house 100 

By Strumpfman's house 85 

Arundale St. 

Hydrant nearest Balmoral St. . 120 

Avon St. 

By Robertson's house 55 

Ballardvale Rd. 

Corner Sunset Rock 110 

By Roggee's house 90 

Balmoral St. 

By the Garage " .... 122 

Bancroft Rd. 

Corner Main 60 

By Couch's house 40 

Bartlet St. 

Corner Chestnut 67^ 

By Gardner's house 80 

Bellevue St. 

By Livingston's house 100 

Brook St. 

By Sellars's house 85 

Burnham Rd. 

Corner Dufton Rd 112 

Buxton Ct. 

Corner Lewis 85 

Canterbury St. 

By American Woolen Company property 90 

Center St. 

Corner Andover 105 

Near end of line 80 

Central St. 

By I. R. Kimball's house 90 

By Hethrington's store 74 

Chandler Rd. 

By Trauschke's house 70 

By the Kasabian house 80 

19 



Chapel Ave. 

Corner Bartlet 65 lbs. 

Chester St. 

By Greenwood's house . 100 

Chestnut St. 

By the Roach house 5 

Corner Morton 50 

Near Andover Press 65 

Clark Rd. 

By Kibbee's house 92 

Cuba St. 

Near the School 85 

Dascomb Rd. ... 

By F. Abbott's house 70 

Elm St. 

By the Free Church . 65 

Near end of line 47 

Essex St. 

Near the Depot 100 

Harding St. 

Corner High 93 

Haverhill St. 

By Cheroubrier's house 112 

Opposite Garage 117 

Corner York 130 

Corner Main 130 

High St. 

Corner Burnham Rd 82 

Corner Haverhill 100 

By Chad wick's house 100 

High St. (Ballardvale) 

Corner Andover 98 

Highland Rd. 

Near end of line 60 

By Comeau's house 75 

Near gymnasium cage 65 

Love joy Rd. 

Near end of line 75 

Lowell St. 

Near Pumping Station 95 

Corner Lovejoy Rd. 87 

By West Parish Church 65 

Corner Chandler Rd 82 

By Playdon's greenhouse 110 

Near the Post Office 130 

Lupine Rd. 

By Smith's house 107 

Main St. 

Near the Lawrence line 75 

Near the Shawsheen River 95 

By the Tyer Rubber Company Building 67 

20 



Corner Park .75 lbs. 

Corner Punchard Ave 62 

Opposite Chapel Ave 65 

By Southworth's house 70 

By Gould's house 97 

By Knowles's house 135 

Near end of line 135 

Maple Ave. 

By Boddy's house 70 

Corner Walnut Ave 80 

Marland St. 

Corner Tewksbury 98 

Morton St. 

By Crawford's house 56 

Near end of line 32 

Orchard St. 

By LeBoutillier's 80 

Osgood St. 

By Pillsbury's house 85 

By Corliss's house 90 

Near Osgood School 95 

Phillips St. 

Corner Main 22 

Near Williams Hall 52 

Corner Abbot 75 

Poor St. 

Corner Corbett 80 

Porter Rd. 

By Dearborn's property 90 

By Towle's house 70 

By Garth's house 55 

Prospect Hill Rd. 

• By Bornemann's house 65 

River St. 

First hydrant from Andover St 115 

Rocky Hill Rd. 

By Thomes's house 120 

Salem St. 

Corner Highland Rd 62 

Corner Holt 53 

Corner Stinson 60 

By Collins's house 107 

By Wright's house 100 

School St. 

By Chapin's house 70 

Corner Morton 52 

Corner Main 36 

Shawsheen Rd. 

Corner Brechin Terrace 100 

By Cunningham house 85 

21 



Stevens St. 

Near the bridge 115 lbs. 

Stinson St. 

Corner Vine 50 

Corner Highland Rd 27 

Sunset Rock Rd. 

By Sanborn's house / . . 110 

By Barnes's house 100 

By Donovan's house * 80 

Sutherland St. 

By American Woolen Companv property 110 

Tantallon Rd. 

Corner Haverhill 132 

Tewksbury St. 

Near Railroad crossing 100 

By Dumont's house 95 

Union St. 

By Donald's house 100 

Walnut Ave. 

Near Carmel 50 

Washington Ave. 

52 

Whittier St. 

Corner Elm 52 

Wild wood Rd. 

By Millett's house 95 

William St. 

Hydrant nearest Poor St 95 

Woburn St. 

By Mailoux's 75 

Corner Andovei 90 

Wolcott Ave. 

By McTernen's house 52 

The hydrants supplied by the low pressure service are painted black with a 
white top; those supplied by the high pressure service are painted black with 
a red top. 

On July 25th the reservoir on Prospect Hill was cleaned out. 
The banks were washed with a hose and the bottom was brushed 
and flushed out. This work took five men from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 
There was one hydrant set in Andover Square and two on Lowell 
Street, one near the old Clark farm and one in the vicinity of 
the old Watson farm. All the gates have been checked up and 
also the house service boxes. We are now making duplicate 
books of all this work, as ordered by the fire underwriters. We 
have pumped at Haggett's Pond during the year 332,409,160 
gallons, the largest amount ever pumped in a single year. The 

22 



plant was in operation every day during the year. The average 
consumption was 910,710 gallons daily and the average time of 
pumping 13 hours and 3 minutes daily. The greatest amount, 
namely 1,647,781 gallons for a single day, was pumped on 
November 13th. The water receipts for 1923 amounted to 
$37,718.68, making $5,887.30 more than the receipts for 1922. 
The station on Bancroft Road is still giving excellent results and 
is used about 35 hours per week. 

The engineer's house is in need of repairs, and also the grounds 
at the pumping station. There is some town property which 
should be fenced in. 

I would recommend for maintenance for 1924, $33,500.00, to 
be divided as follows : 



Salaries and labor 


$14,000.00 


200 tons of coal 


1,600.00 


Engine and cylinder oil 


300.00 


Power, No. 1 station 


8,000.00 


Power, No. 2 station 


1,500.00 


Keeping horse and car 


700.00 


Repairs on steam plant 


1,000.00 


Tools 


300.00 


Repairs and regrading grounds 


2,000.00 


Fence on corner 


750.00 


Miscellaneous 


1,500.00 


Survey of water system 


1,500.00 


Two ceilings and wiring engineer's house 


350.00 


Total 


$33,500.00 


Service Pipe 





The number of applications in 1923 was 155, making a total 
of 2064. 

In use January 1, 1923, 1800; put in, up to January 1, 1924, 
150; 1950 in use January 1, 1924. 

Meters in use January 1, 1923, 1745; meters set during 1923, 
111; 1856 in use January 1, 1924. 

I would recommend for Service Pipe for the year 1924, the 
sum of $15,000.00, to be divided as follows: 

23 



Labor and salaries $4,000.00 

Service pipe, brass goods 2,500.00 

Meters 2,500.00 

100 S. P. boxes 225.00 

Trucking and Teaming 400.00 

Service pipe, various sizes 4,000.00 

Miscellaneous 1,375 . 00 

Total $15,000.00 

Receipts 

Service pipe and meters $19,942 . 76 

Water receipts 37,718.68 

$57,661.44 
Paid to Town Treasurer 

Water receipts $37,718.68 

Pipe account 19,942 . 76 



$57,661.44 $57,661.44 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

In 1923 the filter beds received general care and the new pump 
house was reconditioned. I would recommend for maintenance 
for 1924, $6000.00, to be divided as follows: 

Salaries $2000.00 

Power 2500.00 

Sinking Fund 1000.00 

Miscellaneous 500.00 

Total $6000.00 

House Connections 

There were twenty-five applications received and twenty-four 
connections laid, making a total of 812 in use January 1, 1924. 

Common Sewers 

The outfall sewer is the only main sewer laid this year by the 
town. A full report of this work will be found in the secretary's 
report. The expenditures on this work up to January 1, 1924, 
were $189,908.48, of which the town spent $149,596.73, and the 
city of Lawrence $40,311.75. 

24 



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Boston-Lawrence Dispatch 

A. L. Cole Co 

Neptune Meter Co. 
George A. Caldwell 
Bride & Grimes 
Chadwick Lead Co. 
Eagle Oil & Supply Co. . 
Buchan & McNally . . 
Franklin Fire & Chain Co. 
Bingham Taylor . 
Union Meter Co. . 

N. E. T. & T 

Andover Press I 
Frost & Adams 
Hersey Mfg. Co. . 
Worthington Pump Co. . 

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C. A. Hill 

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W. C. Crowley 

Nat. Meter Co. ... 

Gamon Meter Co. 

Cross Coal Co. . . . 

Youlden Smith & Hopkins 

John J. McCarthy . . 

Merrimac Boiler Co. . 



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Andover Coal 
James R. Bar 
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Castner, Curr 
Lawrence Ma 
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W. H. Welch 
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M. J. Doyle, . 
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1 






1 





SUMMARY COST OF CONSTRUCTION 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



Designation 


Approved 
Bills 


Credits 


Net Cost 


Totals 


Office Fixtures 

Telemeters 

Telephones 

Teams 

Pipe Distribution .... 

Service Pipe 

Water and Land . . . 

Suction Pipe 

Reservoir 

Coal Shed 

Grading Land 

Workshop 

Building Pumping Station 
Pumping Plant .... 
Construction Expense . 

Tools 

Maintenance 

Interest and Bonds 


$21221.01 
10985.44 

160.80 
21960.00 
14862.50 


$10936.07 

8788.14 

218.55 


$10284.94 
2197.30 

160.80 
21741.45 
14862.50 


$ 561.75 

2290.15 

184.77 

583.65 

302813.48 

38628.28 

6687.23 

1309.46 

16985.82 

806.97 

1739.12 

1271.88 

9610.14 

47933.54 

9406.21 

4352.85 


Total 


$69189.75 


$19942.76 


$49246.99 


$445165.30 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 



Sewer Mains 


70225 ft. 










No. Filter Beds .... 




28 








No. Sludge Beds . . . 




3 








Cost to Abutters 






$135361.74 


}jan. 


t, 1924 


Cost to Town .... 






347460.84 


Total 


70225 ft. 


31 


$482822.58 





Lawrence outfall sewer 14,325 feet, or 2.71 miles. 



29 



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HIGHWAYS AND PARKS 



To the Board of Public Works: 

Gentlemen : — 

I submit for your approval the eleventh annual report of the 
Highway Department for the year ending December 31, 1923. 

Our work for the year 1923 started on December 29, 1922, 
the day of a big snowstorm, which came in the first week of the 
year. The following table gives the snowfall which was taken 
care of with the 1923 appropriation. 



Dec. 1922 


Ian 


. 1923 


Feb. 


1923 


29 8" 


4 


13" 


1 


72 




6 


2y 2 " 


7 


3" 




8 


1W 


10 


2y 2 " 




10 


5" 


13 


6" 




12 


12" 


14 


WaT 




15 


2y 2 " 


27 


%" 




22 


X" 


28 


1" 




24 


V 







March 1923 


April 1923 


Nov. 1923 


7 8" 


16 X" 


9 W 


io y 2 " 






12 2" 






14 1M' 






31 K" 







Dec. 1923 

24 1" 

25 K" 

28 zy 2 " 

31 U" 



There were 20% inches of snowfall in November and Decem- 
ber, 1922, making in all a total of 114 3-8 inches. Last winter 
was one of the worst, and it was almost impossible to keep the 
walks clear and many of the roads were unfit for travel. This 
winter we are better prepared than ever, having a State truck 
equipped with a plough, as well as three town ploughs which can 
be attached to trucks in short order. With the above, we are in 
hopes of keeping all the main highways opened for auto travel 
at all times. The roads in the outlying districts will be taken 
care of as soon as possible after the main arteries are opened. 
On April 5th considerable rain fell, which caused several wash- 
outs. These were repaired with ashes and gravel. 

We started patching holes in our tarvia roads the week of 
April 23rd, and blanketing the same the week of May 7th. This 



31 



work was completed around June 1st. In blanketing our streets 
this year, 25,119 gallons of Tarvia and 8,050 gallons of asphalt 
oil were used. About 890 yards of sand were required to cover 
this and 100 yards were placed in the shed for sanding sidewalks 
this winter. There were used for patching roads, sidewalks, 
and gutters 35 barrels of K. P., a cold patch which is mixed with 
sand or pea stone. Chestnut Street, Washington Avenue, 
Lupine Road, and several small places such as around the depot 
were scarified and given a very heavy coat of 45% asphalt oil 
which worked out very well. We scarified Andover Street from 
River Street to Woburn Street, put on some gravel as a binder 
and then covered it with oil. There has been ashes put on the 
following streets: High Street, Carmel Street, Poor Street, High- 
land Road, Ballardvale Road, Hidden Road, Argilla Road, Wild- 
wood Road, Jenkins Road, River Road, Haggett's Pond Road, 
Chandler Road, High Plain Road, Corbett Street. 

Many roads were scraped this year and considerable good work 
has been accomplished. Mr. Elmer Conkey did most of the 
scraping and dragging. Many old stone culverts, which had 
fallen in and were stopping the flow of water, were replaced by 
corrugated pipe culverts. There are still many old culverts 
which will have to be replaced by new corrugated culverts. 
These are mostly in the outlying districts. 

In Ballardvale 534 loads of gravel were used in repairing the 
roads. The Fire Department team was used and also help from 
the Vale. The work in this section was looked after by Mr. 
Haggerty. The work on Andover street was quite extensive, so 
ojur regular men were sent to do this. The steam roller was 
also used on this job. This winter there has been a new plough 
bought for this section of the town. 

Sidewalk work totaling 901 square yards has been done on 
Shawsheen Road and Stevens Street; also 171 yards of coating 
put on in several places and several driveways and gutters have 
been repaired, totaling 443 square yards. One hundred and 
sixty feet of curbing were set on High Street. The above work 
was done by contractor W T . F. Duffee for the sum of $2047.65. 
The^e is stUl considerable sidewalk and gutter work to be done. 
They are continually washing out and need to be filled with a 
tar material. When a road is built it should always be borne in 

32 



mind that considerable money is saved by curbing both sides 
of the road. When this is done there is very little chance of the 
road's being washed out. 

William Street was built by the American Woolen Company 
in the late fall of 1921 and the frost got into it, causing it to 
break up. To save the road, it was scarified and brought to 
grade with broken stone and then given a 2-inch topping of 
Warrenite. This was done by the Thomas G. Jewett, Jr., Con- 
struction Company for the sum of $4000.00, and was guaranteed 
for five years. 

Shawsheen Road was curbed from the village center to the 
top of P. D. Smith's Hill on one side, and from Stevens Street 
to near Lincoln Street on the other side. This 3160 feet of 
curbing which was set by contract at a price of 50 cents per foot. 
A catchbasin was installed, the culverts were cleaned out and 
the sewer manholes slightly raised. We sub-graded the road 
and intended to build same, but found it impossible to get the 
stone and labor. On this account, bids were asked and M. 
McDonough & Co. of Swampscott, Mass., was the successful 
bidder at $1.50 per square yard. There were 7061 square yards 
built at this price, which is much lower than the town could do it. 
Under a special appropriation, sidewalks were built in front 
of the Musgrove Building and from Campion's corner to Miller's 
Shoe Store. The poles were not removed until the cold weather 
set in, so a few squares where these poles set will not be filled in 
until the weather permits. There still remains on this job an 
unexpended balance of $1160.52, which I hope will take care of 
the sidewalk to Chestnut Street. 

I would recommend for Highway maintenance the same as 
last year, $45,000.00, to be divided as follows: 

Labor and teaming $15,000. 00 

Blanketing streets 3,250.00 

Oiling streets 500.00 

Sidewalk work 3,000.00 

Gravel and ashes 9,500 . 00 

Snow 5,250.00 

Drain 2,000.00 



Amount carried forward $38500.00 

33 



Amount brought forward 




$38500.00 


Team and car 




1,000.00 


Bridges 




1,000.00 


Catchbasins and culverts 




2,000.00 


Street signs 




500.00 


Miscellaneous 




2,000.00 


Total 




$45,000.00 


Spent on snow to February 4, 1924, 


$4176.97. 




The following highway construction 


is recommended 


for 1924: 






Shawsheen Road, 7000 yds. 




$12000.00 


Stevens Street, 6000 yds. 




12000.00 


Lowell Street, 4200 yds. 




10500.00 


Elm Street, 9500 yds. 




14250.00 


Haverhill Street (State, County and Town) 


3000.00 


Abbot Street, 3120 yds. 




6000.00 


Curb on Main Street, Library to Pearson St. 


1200.00 


Curb on Park Street to Florence; also sidewalk 


2000.00 


Gutter work 




2000.00 
62,950.00 


Recommended for Highway construction for 1924 40000 . 00 


Financial Statement 




Appropriation March, 1923 






Highway Dept., Maintenance 




$45000.00 


Construction 




30000.00 


Credits 




626.50 


Total 


$75,626.50 


Expenditures 






Maintenance 


$27641 


.19 


Construction 


28623 


.64 


Sidewalks 


1000 


.00 


Snow 


17369 


35 


Tools 


218, 


42 


Drains 


714. 


44 


Balance 


32. 


46 


Total 


$75626.50 



34 



Rogers Brook 



Special appropriation 
Approved bills 



Balance 

Main Street (Special) 

Appropriation March, 1923 
Balance January 1, 1923 
Credits 

Approved bills 



$2500.00 
1514.80 



Balance 


$985 . 20 


Main Street Sidewalk (Special) 




Appropriation March, 1923 


$3000.00 


Approved bills 


1839.48 


Balance 


$1160.52 


Haverhill Street 




Special appropriation 


$30000.00 


Credit from State 


8000.00 


Credit from County 


4900.00 


Total 


$42900.00 


Approved bills 


37405.26 



$5494.74 



$14157.15 

835.55 
304.74 

$15297.44 



PARK DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation March, 1923 
Approved bills 

Balance 



$1200.00 
1186.71 

$13.29 



35 



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TOWN OF 
ANDOVER, MASS. 

SHOWING WATER MAINS 
and HYDRANTS 

Water Mains and Hydrant* on Private Property 
ihovn in only a few places. 

JANUARY 1, 1924 

Pipes supplied by High Service 

._ " " " Low 



CONTENTS 





page- 




PAGE 


Almshouse Expense 


46 


Librarian's Report 


101 


Relief out of 


47 


Memorial Day 


37 


Aiding Mothers 


48 


Memorial Hall Library 


95 


Andover Post No. 8 


38 


Miscellaneous 


43 


Animal Inspector 


51 


Moth Suppression 


34 


Appropriations, 1924 


18 


Municipal Properties 


65 


Art Gallery 


119 


Overseers of the Poor 


45 


Assessors' Report 


64 


Police 


39,54 


Assets 


68 


Pomp's Pond Recreation Com- 




Auditors' Report 


77 


mittee 


41 


Board of Health 


32 


Printing 


33 


Board of Health Nurse 


56 


Punchard Free School, Report of 


Board of Public Works 


Appendix 


Trustees 


78 


Brush Fires 


38 


Redemption of Bonds 


44 


Building Inspector's Report 


52 


Retirement of Veterans 


37 


Collector's Account 


67 


Schools 


25 


Cornell Fund 


60 


Sewer Sinking Fund 


39 


County Tax 


36 


Soldiers' Relief 


47 


Dog Tax 


36 


Spring Grove Cemetery 


35,49 


Dump, Care of 


37 


State Aid 


47 


Election and Registration 


31 


State Taxes 


36 


Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital 40 


Street Lighting 


33 


Financial Report 


25 


Tax Collector 


66 


Fire Department 


38, 53 


Temporary Loans 


42 


Finance Committee 


85 


Town House 


30 


G. A. R. Post 99 


37 


Town Meeting 


14 


Hay Scales 


33 


Town Officers 


4,28 


Insurance 


44 


Town Warrant 


7,81 


Interest 


42 


Treasurer's Report 


68 


Jury List 


61 


Tree Warden 


34 


Liabilities 


68 


War Memorial Committee 


40 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1924 



Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor 
FRANK H. HARDY, Chairman Term expires 1926 

CHARLES BOWMAN " " 1927 

ANDREW McTERNEN, Secretary " " 1925 

A ssessors 

FRANK H. HARDY, Chairman Term expires 1926 

CHARLES BOWMAN " " 1927 

ANDREW McTERNEN, Secretary " " 1925 

Town Clerk 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Town Treasurer 
GEORGE A. HIGGINS 

Tax Collector 
WILLIAM B. CHEEVER 

School Committee 

ROY H. BRADFORD Term expires 1925 

RAYMOND S. BARTLETT " " 1925 

W. DUDLEY YATES " " 1925 

DR. W. DACRE WALKER " " 1925 

FREDERICK E. CHEEVER " " 1926 

ERNEST A. JOHNSON " " 1926 

THAXTER EATON V " 1927 

MARY W. FRENCH " " 1927 

DAVID R. LAWSON " " 1927 

Superintendent of Schools 
HENRY C. SANBORN 

Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund Commission 
ARTHUR T. BOUTWELL Term expires 1925 

EDWARD SHATTUCK " " 1925 

WALTER I. MORSE " " 1926 

PHILIP L. HARDY " " 1927 

WILLIAM D. McINTYRE " " 1927 



Superintendent of Water, Sewer Department, Highways and Parks 
FRANK L. COLE 

Chief of Fire Department 
CHARLES F. EMERSON 



Board of Health 

CHARLES E. ABBOTT, M.D. 
BANCROFT T. HAYNES 
FRANKLIN H. STACEY 



Term expires 1925 
" 1926 
" 1927 



Chief of Police 
FRANK M. SMITH 



Constables 



JAMES NAPIER 
FRANK M. SMITH 
GEORGE N. SPARKS 



Term expires 1925 
" 1925 
" 1925 



Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 

E. KENDALL JENKINS 
REV. FREDERICK A. WILSON 
FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 
NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 
PHILIP F. RIPLEY 
ALFRED E. STEARNS 
BURTON S. FLAGG 



Term expires 1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 



Trustees of Punchard Free School ■ — Terms expire 1925 

FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL JOHN H. CAMPION 

MYRON E. GUTTERSON HARRY H. NOYES 

EDMOND E. HAMMOND 



A uditors 

JOHN S. ROBERTSON LOUIS S. FINGER 

HARRY SELLARS 



Trustees of Cornell Fund 

CHARLES N. MARLAND Term expires 1925 

JOHN C. ANGUS " " 1926 

DR. WILLIAM D. WALKER " " 1927 

Superintendent of Moth Department 
EDWARD H. BERRY 

Tree Warden 
EDWARD H. BERRY 

Moderator of Town Meetings 
ALFRED E. STEARNS 

Registrars of Voters 

SAMUEL P. HULME JOHN F. HURLEY 

PATRICK J. SCOTT GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Clerk 

Trustees Spring Grove Cemetery 

WALTER I. MORSE DANIEL H. POOR 

FRED E. CHEEVER FRED A. SWANTON 

EVERETT M. LUNDGREN DAVID R. LAWSON 

JOHN W. STARK 

Street Lighting Committee 

WALTER H. COLEMAN HENRY J. GARDNER 

FREDERIC G. MOORE JAMES C. SOUTER 

FRED G. CHENEY 

Finance Committee 

HENRY A. BODWELL, Chairman WILLIAM C. CROWLEY 

JOHN C. ANGUS, Secretary CHESTER W. HOLLAND 

IRVING SOUTHWORTH GEORGE H. WINSLOW 

GEORGE L. AVERILL 



TOWN WARRANT 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ss: To either of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, Greeting : 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in elections and in town affairs to meet and assemble at 
the designated polling places in Precincts One, Two, Three and 
Four, viz: The Town House in Precinct One; the Old School 
House, Ballardvale, in Precinct Two; the Boys' Club House, 
Shawsheen Village, in Precinct Three; and the Phillips Club 
House, School Street, in Precinct Four, in said Andover, on 
Monday, The Third Day of March, 1924, at 6 o'clock a.m., 
to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. ■ — To elect a Moderator for one year, Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for one 
year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, one 
member of the Board of Assessors for three years, three members 
of the School Committee for three years, one member of the 
School Committee for two years (to fill vacancy), two members 
of the Board of Public Works for three years, one member of the 
Board of Health for three years, three Auditors of Accounts for 
one year, three Constables for one year, one Trustee of Memorial 
Hall Library for seven years, one Tree Warden for one year and 
all town officers required by law to be elected by ballot. Also to 
take action on the following question : Shall licenses be granted 
for the sale of certain non-intoxicating beverages in this town? 

All to be voted for on one ballot. The polls will be open from 
6 o'clock a.m. to 5 o'clock p.m. 

After final action on the preceding Article one, the said meeting 
shall stand adjourned by virtue of Section 20, Chapter 39, of the 



General Laws, to Monday, March 10th, at 1.30 o'clock p.m. at 
the Town Hall, then and there to act upon the following articles, 
namely : 

Article 2. — To elect all other officers not required by law to 
be elected by ballot. 

Article 3. — To determine what sums of money shall be appro- 
priated for Almshouse Expenses, Relief out of Almshouse, Aiding 
Mothers with Dependent Children, Board of Health, Brush 
Fires, Fire Department, Hay Scales, Highway Department In- 
surance, Interest, Memorial Hall Library, Memorial Day, Post 99, 
G. A. R., Miscellaneous, Parks and Playsteads, Police, Printing, 
Election and Registration, Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital 
Maintenance, Public Dump, Retirement of Veterans, Reserve 
Fund, Redemption of Water, Sewer, High School, Main Street, 
Shawsheen Bridge and Shawsheen School Bonds, Schools, Sewer 
Maintenance, Sewer Sinking Funds, Soldiers' Relief, Spring 
Grove Cemetery, State Aid, Street Lighting, Town Officers, 
Town House, Tree Warden, Moth Department, Water Main- 
tenance, Construction, Andover Post No. 8, American Legion, 
and other town charges and expenses. 

Article 4. — To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of seventy-one thousand three hundred ninety- 
six dollars and thirteen cents ($71,396.13) levied by the County 
Commissioners of Essex County under Chapter 429 of the Acts 
of 1923 for the construction of the Tuberculosis Hospital at 
Middleton and authorize the treasurer to borrow any or all of the 
said sum or take any action relative thereto. 

Article 5. — To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to extend the water main from the Pumping 
Station, Lowell Street, to Etalo Belmessiere's residence and ap- 
propriate the sum of twenty thousand ($20,000.) dollars therefor, 
on petition of W. I. Livingston and others. 

Article 6. — To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to extend the water main from the dead end at the 
residence of William F. Trauschke along North Street as far as 
the North School at the corner of North Street and River Road 
and appropriate the sum of twenty thousand ($20,000.) dollars 
therefor, on petition of George Lee and others. 

Article 7. — To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 

8 



Public Works to extend water service on Corbett Road from the 
point in said road where such service now ends to the main 
entrance of the Sacred Heart Cemetery, and to appropriate 
therefor the sum of six thousand ($6000.) dollars, on petition of 
Edward Topping and others. 

Article 8. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
four thousand ($4000.) dollars to lay a six-inch water main on 
North Street to the home known as the Brown Place, and then 
to the home of Edward Rogers on Chandler Road, on petition of 
George F. Parker and others. 

^/Article 9. — To see if the Town will vote to accept as a part of 
its sewerage system a sewer on Poor Street from a point begin- 
ning at Lowell Street, and extending to a manhole at the junction 
of William Street, a distance of 1308 feet and authorize the 
assessment of betterments upon estates benefited by same, 
according to plan of John Franklin, C. E., dated December 8th, 
1923, and appropriate the sum of $5341.00 to reimburse the 
American Woolen Co. for the cost of constructing the same in 
case of said acceptance, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 10. — To see if the Town will authorize the building of 
a sewer, beginning at the terminus of the present sewer on Poo J 
Street and extending a short distance on Magnolia Avenue, to a 
point near the Shawsheen School, an entire distance of about 
300 feet and appropriate the sum of $2000.00 for its construction 
and accept the same as a part of the sewerage system, on petition 
of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 11. — To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to sell to the American Woolen Company for fifteen 
hundred ($1500.00) dollars, the land owned by the town, which 
was formerly used for its filtration plant, and authorize the 
Selectmen to convey the said land by a proper deed or deeds in 
behalf of the town, the Selectmen to retain and reserve for the 
Town such rights of way as may be necessary or advisable for the 
Town to hold, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 12. — To see if the Town will accept the provisions of 
Sections 42, 43 and 44 of Chapter 48 of the General Laws relating 
to the establishment of a fire department under the control of an 
officer to be known as the Chief of the Fire Department, on 
petition of the Selectmen. 



Article 13. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
sixty-five hundred ($6500.00) dollars to purchase a lot of land 
containing about seventeen (17) acres, lying between Spring 
Grove Cemetery and Porter Road, on petition of the Trustees of 
Spring Grove Cemetery. 

Article 14. — To see if the Town will vote to construct a 
granolithic sidewalk on the North and South side and in front 
of the Town Hall, also a reinforced granolithic driveway in front 
of said building and appropriate the sum of twenty-five hundred 
($2500.) dollars therefor, on petition of the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 15. — To hear and act on the report of the War Me- 
morial Committee. 

Article 16. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$2000. for the collection and disposal of garbage, and if the Town 
believes that the collection and disposal should be a self sustain- 
ing proposition, to see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to put such a plan in operation under such regulations, 
based upon the actual cost of the service and no more, as may be 
justified in order to make the service effective, on petition of 
Madeleine B. Francke and others. 

Article 17. — To see if the Town will accept Section 12 of 
Chapter 40 of the General Laws which reads as follows: 

"A Town which accepts this section, or has accepted cor- 
responding provisions of earlier laws, by a two-thirds vote at an 
annual meeting, may purchase or lease land, and erect, alter, 
enlarge, repair and improve buildings for public baths and wash 
houses, either with or without open drying grounds, and may 
make open bathing places, provide them with the requisite 
furniture, fittings and conveniences and provide instruction in 
swimming. Such Towns may establish rates for the use of such 
baths and wash houses, and appoint officers therefor and may 
make by-laws for the government of such officers, and authorize 
them to make regulations for the management thereof, and for 
the use thereof by non-residents of said Town," and also appro- 
priate the sum of two thousand ($2000.) dollars if said section is 
accepted, for the purpose of establishing and maintaining swim- 
ming baths at Pomp's Pond, on petition of John F. O'Connell and 
others. 

Article 18. — To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 

10 



sum of five thousand ($5000.) dollars to purchase a Triple Com- 
bination Pump, Chemical Tank, Hose Body, fully equipped, 
mounted on Reo Speed Wagon Chassis, on petition of the resi- 
dents of Ballardvale, same to be placed in the Ballardvale Fire 
Engine House. 

Article 19. — To see if the Town will raise and appropriate 
forty-five hundred ($4500.) dollars to erect bleachers and to 
provide playground accessories for the Playstead, to be expended 
as the Town may direct, on petition of Andover Post, No. 8, 
American Legion, and others. 

Article 20. — To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a 
sum not exceeding three thousand ($3000.) dollars for the in- 
stalling of a new twenty (20) ton scale, on petition of Harry H. 
Remick and others. 

Article 21. — To see if the Town will accept as a town way, as 
laid out by the Selectmen, and shown on plan filed with the Town 
Clerk, a street located on the northerly side of Chestnut Street, 
about one hundred and twenty-two feet easterly of land of Burtt 
and running northerly to Summer Street, on petition of Llewel- 
lyn D. Pomeroy and others. 

Article 22. — To see if the Town will vote to change the name 
of that part of Poor Street, running from Main Street south- 
westerly to Corbett Road, to Oxford Street, on petition of George 
H. Winslow and others. 

Article 23. — To see if the Town will vote to change the name 
of that part of Poor Street extending from Main and Lowell 
Streets northerly to Corbett Road, to Warwick Street, also to 
change the name of Magnolia Avenue to Warwick Street, com- 
bining these two streets under the same name, on petition of 
George H. Winslow and others. 

Article 24. — To see if the Town will place a Fire Alarm Box 
at the corner of Ballardvale Road and Woburn Street and ap- 
propriate a sum of money therefor, on petition of John Colbath 
and others. 

Article 25. — To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 
sum of $300.00 as its apportionment toward the erection of a 
sixty-foot steel forest fire observation tower on the summit of 
Prospect Hill by the Division of Forestry of Massachusetts, as 
authorized by Section 5, Chapter 40 of the General Laws. 

11 



Article 26. — To see if the Town will vote to release any 
rights acquired by it by virtue of an oral agreement made be- 
tween the Board of Public Works and Maurice J. Curran for the 
laying and maintenance of sewer pipes across the Roger Sweeney 
Field, and to authorize the Board of Public Works through its 
chairman to execute such release in behalf of the Town, on 
petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 27. — To see if the Town will vote to discontinue that 
part of Whittier Street between the Park and School property, a 
distance of 583 feet from Bartlet Street to the junction of Whit- 
tier Court and Whittier Street, so that this may become a part 
of the Park System, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 28. — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 29. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in anticipation of the revenue of the 
current financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

Article 30. — To determine what disposition shall be made of 
unexpended appropriations. 

Article 31. — To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

Article 32. ■ — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof, seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this nineteenth day of February, A.D. 
1924. 

FRANK H. HARDY 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Selectmen of Andover 



12 



Andover, March 3, 1924. 
Essex, ss. 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of 
the Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the in- 
habitants of said town to meet at the time and places and for the 
purposes stated in said warrant by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse and 
in no less than five other public places, where bills and notices 
are usually posted, and by publication in the Andover Townsman. 
Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

FRANK M. SMITH, Constable 



13 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 3, 1924 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to vote in town affairs convened in Precincts One, Two, 
Three and Four in said Andover on Monday the Third day of 
March, 1924, at six o'clock in the forenoon, agreeably to the 
requirements of the foregoing warrant, Took up Article One and 
proceeded to vote for Town Officers and on the License question. 

The ballot boxes were found to be empty and registered 0000. 
The polls opened at 6 o'clock a.m. and closed at 5 o'clock p.m. 
The total number of ballots cast was 1903, viz.: 

Precinct One 1119, Precinct Two 205, Precinct Three 325, 
Precinct Four 254. 

The result of the balloting was as follows: 

Moderator — One Year: 
Precincts 

3 4 

1497 

1 

405 

Town Clerk — One Year 

826 167 279 221 George A. Higgins 1493 

293 38 46 33 Blanks 410 

Town Treasurer — One Year : 

789 163 274 214 George A. Higgins 1440 

330 42 51 40 Blanks 463 



1 


2 


3 


4 




847 


157 


280 
1 


213 


Alfred E. Stearns 
John Traynor 


272 


49 


44 


41 


Blanks 



Selectman — Three Years: 



458 


108 


169 


120 


Charles Bowman 


253 


50 


32 


78 


Walter H. Coleman 


372 


44 


114 


48 


James C. Souter 


36 


3 


10 


8 


Blanks 



855 
413 

578 

57 



14 



Assessc 


)R — Three Years : 




446 


104 168 123 Charles Bowman 


841 


262 


46 37 78 Walter H. Coleman 


423 


363 


44 111 45 James C. Souter 


563 


48 


11 9 8 Blanks 


76 


Collector of Taxes — One Year : 




819 


163 290 217 William B. Cheever 


1489 


300 
School 


42 35 37 Blanks 
Committee — Three Years : 


414 


760 


134 238 201 Thaxter Eaton 


1333 


689 


127 241 201 Mary O. French 


1268 


727 


129 261 194 David R. Lawson 


1311 




1 V. D. Harrington 


1 


1181 
School 


215 235 165 Blanks 

Committee — Two Years {to fill vacancy) : 


1796 


721 


138 282 200 Ernest A. Johnson 


1341 


398 
Truste 


67 43 54 Blanks 
;e of Memorial Hall Library — Seven Years: 


562 


765 


143 264 215 Burton S. Flagg 


1387 


354 


62 61 39 Blanks 


516 



Board of Public Works and Sinking Fund Commission — 
Three Years : 

777 141 258 204 Philip L. Hardy 1360 
683 162 238 189 William D. Mclntyre 1292 

778 107 154 115 Blanks 1154 

Board of Health ■ — Three Years : 



748 


144 


263 194 


Franklin H. Stacey 


1349 


371 


61 


62 60 


Blanks 


554 


rDITOJ 


RS OF 


Accounts - 


- One Year : 




746 


136 


242 205 


Louis S. Finger 


1329 


795 


142 


240 196 


John S. Robertson 


1373 


740 


140 


249 197 


Harry Sellars 


1326 


1076 


197 


244 164 


Blanks 


1681 



15 



Constables — One Year : 

687 132 240 185 James Napier 1244 

698 141 254 183 Frank M. Smith 1276 

722 154 252 191 George N. Sparks 1319 

1250 188 229 203 Blanks 1870 

Tree Warden — One Year : 

739 147 264 204 Edward H. Berry 1354 

1 E. Powers 1 

380 58 61 49 Blanks 548 

Shall Licenses be granted for the sale of certain non-intoxicating 
beverages in this town? 

366 60 117 62 Yes 605 

484 95 156 145 No 880 

269 50 52 47 Blanks 418 

REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT ONE 

Andover, March 3, 1924 
Polls opened at 6 a.m. and closed at 5 p.m. Ballot Box regis- 
tered 0000 at opening, when closed 1120; number of ballots 
received 1950. Ballots returned 831. Number of ballots cast 
1119. Female votes cast 405, male votes cast 714. 

MARK M. KEANE, Clerk 

REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT TWO 

Ballard vale, March 3, 1924 
Polls opened at 6 a.m. and closed at 5 p.m. Ballot box regis- 
tered at opening 0000, when closed 205. Number of ballots 
received 500, number of ballots cast 205. Ballots returned 295. 
Warden Clester E. Matthews in charge. Constable George N. 
Sparks on duty. 

JOSEPH P. LYNCH, Clerk 

REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT THREE 

Shawsheen Village, March 3, 1924 
Polls opened at 6 a.m. and closed at 5 p.m. Ballot box regis- 
tered at opening 0000, when closed 325. Number of ballots cast 
325. Number of ballots received 650. Ballots returned 325. 

HENRY J. LAVERY, Clerk 

16 



REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT FOUR 

Andover, March 3, 1924 
Polls opened at 6 a.m. at the Phillips Club, School Street, with 
Warden H. S. Hopper in charge. Ballot box registered at open- 
ing 0000. The polls closed at 5 p.m., with a total of 254 votes. 
Total number of ballots received 599. Ballots returned 345. 
Officer William L. Frye on duty: ^f" $ 

ROBERT W. WINTERS, Clerk 

After final action on Article One, the said meeting was ad- 
journed by virtue of Section 20, Chapter 39 of the General Laws 
to Monday, March 10th, at 1.30 o'clock p.m. at the Town Hall. 



1.30 O'CLOCK P.M. MONDAY, MARCH 10TH, 1924 

The Moderator declared: 

Alfred E. Stearns elected Moderator for One Year. 

George A. Higgins elected Town Clerk for One Year. 

George A. Higgins elected Town Treasurer for one year. 

Charles Bowman elected Selectman for three years. 

Charles Bowman elected Assessor for three years. 

William B. Cheever elected Collector of Taxes for one year. 

Thaxter Eaton elected member School Committee for three 
years. 

Mary O. French elected member School Committee for three 
years. 

David R. Lawson elected member School Committee for three 
years. 

Ernest A. Johnson elected member School Committee for two 
years (to fill vacancy). 

Burton S. Flagg elected Trustee of Memorial Hall Library for 
seven years. 

Philip L. Hardy elected member Board of Public Works and 
Sinking Fund Commission for three years. 

William D. Mclntyre elected member Board of Public Works 
and Sinking Fund Commission for Three years. 

17 



Franklin H. Stacey elected member Board of Health for three 
years. 

Louis S. Finger elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

John S. Robertson elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

Harry Sellars elected Auditor of Accounts for one year. 

James Napier elected Constable for one year. 

Frank M. Smith elected Constable for one year. 

George N. Sparks elected Constable for one year. 

Edward H. Berry elected Tree Warden for one year. 

Took up Article 2 and chose: — 

W. Dacre Walker, trustee of Cornell Fund for three years. 

Chose Street Lighting Committee for One year (appointed by 
the Moderator): Walter H. Coleman, Fred G. Cheney, Henry J. 
Gardner, Frederic G. Moore, James C. Souter. 

Chose Finance Committee for One year (appointed by the 
Moderator): Henry A. Bodwell, William C. Crowley, John C. 
Angus, George L. Averill, Chester W. Holland, George H. Wins- 
low, Irving Southworth. 

War Memorial Committee for one year (appointed by the 
Moderator) : Edward A. Brooks, Frederic S. Boutwell, Joseph L. 
Burns, Nathan C. Hamblin, Roy E. Hardy, Bartlett H. Hayes, 
Ernest A. Johnson. 

Took up Article 3 : — 

Voted to appropriate the following stated sums of money : — 



Almshouse 


$7000.00 


Relief Out 


6000.00 


Aiding Mothers with Dependent Children 


7000.00 


Board of Health 


4000.00 


Brush Fires 


1000.00 


Election and Registration 


2200.00 


Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital (maintenance) 


2883.00 


Fire Department 


26600.00 


G. A. R. 


100.00 


Hay Scales 


125.00 


Amount carried forward 


$56908.00 



18 



Amount brought forward 




$56908.00 


Highways 




80000.00 


Maintenance 


$40000.00 


New construction 


40000.00 


Interest 




41600.00 


Insurance 




6500.00 


Memorial Hall Library 




4500.00 


Memorial Day 




550.00 


Miscellaneous 




600.00 


Parks and Plays teads 




1500.00 


Police 




18250.00 


Printing 




1500.00 


Public Dump 




150.00 


Reserve Fund 


\ 


3000.00 


Retirement of Veterans 




300.00 


Retirement of Bonds 




62500.00 


Schools 




126515.00 


Sewer Department 




6000.00 


Soldiers' Relief 




2000.00 


Spring Grove Cemetery 




5200.00 


State Aid 




500.00 


Street Lighting 




11000.00 


Town House 




3000.00 


Town Officers 




12160.00 


Tree Warden 




10000.00 


Moth Work 


6000.00 


Tree Work 


4000.00 


Water Department, Maintenance 




33500.00 


Water Department Service Pipe 




15000.00 


American Legion, Andover Post No. 8 




1000.00 


Article 4 — Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital 


1396.13 


Article 6 — Water Extension North St. 




20000.00 


Article 9 — Sewer Poor St. 




5341.00 


Article 10 — Sewer Magnolia Ave. 




2000.00 


Article 13 — Spring Grove Cemetery 




2000.00 


Article 16 — Garbage 




2000.00 


Amount carried forward 


$536470.13 



19 



Amount brought forward $536,470.13 

Article 1 7 — Pomp's Pond 2000 . 00 

Article 19 — Bleachers 4500 . 00 

Article 25 — Observation tower — Prospect Hill 300 . 00 



543,270.13 
Haverhill Street Note 30,000 . 00 

State and County Taxes (estimate) 50,000.00 



$623,270.13 



Took up Article 4. 

Voted, at 2.57 p.m. ■ — That for the purpose of paying the first 
apportionment of $71,396.13 of the town's share of the net 
amount of expenditures and indebtedness on account of the 
Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital under the provisions of 
Gen. Laws Chapter 111, Sections 78 to 91, or corresponding 
earlier laws, as amended by Chapter 439, Acts of 1923, by order 
of the County Commissioners of February 6, 1923, said sum of 
$71,396.13 be and the same is hereby appropriated, of which 
amount $1,396.13 be raised in the tax levy of the current year 
1924 and the balance of $70,000.00 be raised under authority of 
Chapter 44 Gen. Laws by borrowing, for which purpose the Town 
Treasurer is hereby authorized and directed to prepare, issue and 
sell, with the approval of the Selectmen, bonds or notes in said 
amount of $70,000 denominated "Town of Andover, County 
Tuberculosis Hospital Loan," dated April 1, 1924, due $7000 on 
April 1, each year 1925 to 1934 inclusive, bearing interest at a 
rate not exceeding 4J^ per cent per annum payable semiannually. 
Other particulars as to form, issuance and sale of said bonds or 
notes shall be determined by the Town Treasurer. The vote 
stood Yeas 223, Nays 0000. 

Took up Article 5. 

Voted, at 3.22 p.m. — to refer to the Board of Public Works 
with the instruction that said Board make a comprehensive study 
and investigation into the subject matter of extending the water 
mains into the outlying districts and report thereon at the next 
annual Town meeting, and with a further instruction that, if, in 

20 



the judgment of said Board any or all of the petitioners men- 
tioned in Article 5,6,7 and 8 should have the extensions requested, 
said Board prepare and insert appropriate article or articles in the 
next annual Town Warrant for action by the Town. 

Took up Article 6. 

Voted, at 4.15 p.m. ■ — to authorize the Board of Public Works 
to extend the water main from the dead end at the residence of 
William F. Trauschke — along North Street as far as the North 
School at the corner of North Street and River Road, and appro- 
priate the sum of twenty thousand ($20000.00) dollars therefor. 

Took up Article 7. 

Voted, at 4.18 p.m. — to refer to the Board of Public Works as 
in Article 5. 

Took up Article 8. 

Voted, at 4.24 p.m. ■ — to refer to the Board of Public Works as 
in Article 5. 

Took up Article 9. 

Voted, at 4.25 p.m. — to accept as a part of its sewerage system 
a sewer on Poor Street from a point beginning at Lowell Street, 
and extending to a manhole at the junction of William Street, a 
distance of 1308 feet, and authorize the assessment of better- 
ments upon estates benefited by same, according to plan of 
John Franklin, C.E., dated December 8th, 1923, and appropriate 
the sum of $5341.00 to reimburse the American Woolen Co. for 
the cost of constructing the same. 

Took up Article 10. 

Voted, at 4.26 p.m. ■ — to authorize the building of a sewer, 
beginning at the terminus of the present sewer on Poor Street 
and extending a short distance on Magnolia Avenue, to a point 
near the Shawsheen School, an entire distance of about 300 feet, 
and appropriate the sum of $2000.00 for its construction and 
accept the same as a part of the sewerage system. 

Took up Article 1 1 . 

Voted, at 4.48 p.m. — to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
sell to the American Woolen Company for One dollar ($1.00), the 

21 



land owned by the town, which was formerly used for its filtration 
plant, and authorize the Selectment to convey the said land by a 
proper deed or deeds in behalf of the town, the Selectmen to re- 
tain and reserve for the Town such rights of way as may be 
necessary or advisable for the Town to hold. 

Took up Article 12. 

Voted, at 4.49 p.m. — To accept the provisions of Sections 42, 
43 and 44 of Chapter 48 of the General Laws relating to the 
establishment of a fire department under the control of an officer 
to be known as the Chief of the Fire Department. 

Took up Article 13. 

Voted, at 4.50 p.m. — to appropriate the sum of $2000.00 to 
purchase a lot of land containing 5 acres, lying between Spring 
Grove Cemetery and Porter Road. 

Took up Article 14. 

Voted, at 4.53 p.m. — to indefinitely postpone. 

Took up Article 15. 

Voted, at 5.50 p.m. ■ — that the Moderator appoint a new com- 
mittee for further study of this matter to report at the next 
annual meeting. 

Voted, at 5.58 p.m. — to adjourn to Saturday, March 15th, at 
2 p.m. 

2 P.M. SATURDAY, MARCH 15TH, 1924 

Dr. Charles E. Abbott arose to a question of personal privilege 
and presented the following resolution which was unanimously 
adopted by a rising vote: — 

Resolved: — that a vote of thanks be tendered Mr. Alfred L. 
Ripley for the able, fair and impartial manner in which he has 
conducted for ten years, the various town meetings which have 
been carried on under his wise and courteous administration as 
Moderator — and it is further moved, that a copy of this Resolu- 
tion be spread upon the records of this meeting. 

Took up Article 18. 

Voted, at 3.25 p.m. — to refer to the Selectmen and Engineers 
to investigate and report recommendations at the next annual 
town meeting. 

22 



Took up Article 19. 

Voted, at 3.45 p.m. — to appropriate the sum of $4500 to erect 
bleachers and to provide playground accessories for thePlaystead, 
to be expended under direction of the Board of Public Works. 

Took up Article 20. 

Voted, at 3.50 p.m. — that article be referred to the Selectmen. 

Took up Article 21. 

Voted, at 3.55 p.m. • — to accept as a town way, as laid out by 
the Selectmen, and shown on plan filed with the Town Clerk, a 
street located on the northerly side of Chestnut Street, about one 
hundred and twenty-two feet easterly of land of Burtt and run- 
ning northerly to Summer Street. 

Took up Article 22. 

Voted, at 4.05 p.m. ■ — not to change the name of that part of 
Poor Street, running from Main Street southwesterly to Corbett 
Road, to Oxford Street. 

Took up Article 23. 

Voted, at 4.06 p.m. — that article be withdrawn. 

Took up Article 24. 

Voted, at 4.07 p.m. — to refer to Fire Engineers. 

Took up Article 25. 

Voted, at 4.08 p.m. — to appropriate the sum of $300 as its 
apportionment toward the erection of a sixty-foot steel forest fire 
observation tower on the summit of Prospect Hill by the Division 
of Forestry of Massachusetts. 

Took up Article 26. 

Voted, at 4.09 p.m. — to release any rights acquired by it by 
virtue of an oral agreement made between the Board of Public 
Works and Maurice J. Curran for the laying and maintenance of 
sewer pipes across the Roger Sweeney Field, and to authorize the 
Board of Public Works through its chairman to execute such 
release in behalf of the town. 

Took up Article 27. 

Voted, at 4.10 p.m.- — to discontinue that part of Whittier 
Street between the Park and School property, a distance of 583 

23 



feet from Bartlet Street to the junction of Whittier Court and 
Whittier Street, so that this may become a part of the Park 
System. 

Took up Article 28. 

Voted, at 4.12 p.m. — That the taxes be collected by the 
Collector, that he receive a salary of $2000 per year and that 
interest be charged at the rate of 6 per cent per annum from 
October 15th on all taxes remaining unpaid after November 1st. 

Took up Article 29. 

Voted, at 4.13 p.m.' — That the Town Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning January 1st, 1924, and to issue a note or 
notes therefor, payable within one year, any debt or debts in- 
curred under this vote to be paid from the revenue of said finan- 
cial year. 

Took up Article 30. 

Voted, at 4.14 p.m. ■ — that all unexpended appropriations be 
turned into the treasury with the exception of the following: 
Water loan, $6882.97; Main Street Sidewalk, $1160.52; Roger's 
Brook, $985.20; Outfall Sewer, $8739.53; Shawsheen School, 
$187,575.95; McCarthy Land Taking, $750; Memorial Commit- 
tee, $444.14. 

Took up Article 31. 

Voted, at 4.16 p.m. — that the Report of the Town Officers be 
accepted and that the Finance Committee for 1924 make a study 
of the several departments so that they can assist in compiling 
a report which shall show the amounts paid and to whom, par- 
ticularly the salaries, etc., of Town Officials. 

Took up Article 32. 

Voted, at 4.22 p.m. ■ — that the meeting be dissolved. 
The foregoing is a true copy of the warrant and of the Officers' 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings of the regular 
and adjourned meetings. 

Attest: 

GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Town Clerk 
24 



FINANCIAL REPORT 



SCHOOLS 




SHAWSHEEN VILLAGE 


: SCHOOL 


Appropriation 


$231000.00 


L. H. Shattuck Company, Inc. Gen. 




Contract 


$182352.80 


Bride & Grimes, Plumbing and Heating 


19414.85 


Engineering Services 


1019.78 


Architectural Fees 


12086.60 


Grading 


2900.00 


Furnishings 


3872.30 


Extras 


1603.53 


Balance on hand, January 1, 1925 


7750.14 



$231000.00 $231000.00 

GENERAL EXPENSES 
Salaries : 

Superintendent $3960 . 00 

Attendance Officer 1 00 . 65 

Clerk 926.00 

$4986.65 

Office and Miscellaneous 295 . 70 

$5282.35 

EXPENSE OF INSTRUCTION 
Supervisors: 

Salaries $7683.73 7683.73 

Teachers : 

High 19025.33 

Elementary 54441.29 

73466.62 

A mount carried forward $8643 2 . 70 

25 



Amount brought forward 

Textbooks : 
High 
Elementary 

Supplies : 
High 
Elementary 





$86432.70 


$969.23 






3072 


.65 










4041 


.88 


1125 


.17 


1325 


.42 







2450.59 



EXPENSE OF OPERATION 



Janitors: 




High 


$2348 . 53 


Elementary 


4844.77 


Fuel: 




High 


883.95 


Elementary 


4220.94 


Miscellaneous: 




High 


418.28 


Elementary 


943.83 


MAINTENANCE 


Repairs : 




High 


$1473.16 


Elementary 


3994.51 



7193.30 



5104.89 



1362.11 



5467.67 



Health : 
High 
Elementary 



AUXILIARY AGENCIES 



$364.15 
1177.80 



1541.95 



Amount carried forward 



$113595.09 



26 



Amount brought forward 

Transportation : 
High 
Elementary 



$113595.09 



2530.50 
4874.86 



7405.39 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Tuition : 

High $132.88 
Elementary 500.08 


$632.96 

1937.04 

130.00 
2759.33 

26515.00 
26459.81 


Sundries: 

High 416.33 
Elementary 1520.71 


OUTLAYS 
Grounds $130.00 
New Equipment 2759.33 

SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND 
EXPENDITURES 

Appropriation $1 
Total Expenditures 1 



Balance 



55.19 



27 



TOWN OFFICERS 



Appropi ia tion $ 1 2 1 60 . 00 

Frank H. Hardy, Chairman Selectmen, 

Assessor and Overseer $900 . 00 

Charles Bowman, Selectman, Assessor 

and Overseer 800.00 

Andrew McTernen, Selectman, Assessor 

and Overseer 800.00 

George A. Higgins, Town Clerk and 
Clerk of Selectmen 

George A. Higgins, Town Treasurer 

William B. Cheever, Tax Collector 

Edith P. Sellais, Clerk and Stenographer 

Joseph I. Pitman, Building Inspector 

Charles T. Gilliard, Building Inspector 

Daniel J. Murphy, Town Counsel 

John S. Robertson, Auditor 

Harry Sellars, Auditor 

Louis S. Finger, Auditor 

Smart & Flagg, Surety Bonds 

Division of Accounts, Certification of 
Notes 

Alfred L. Ripley, Moderator 

Stationery and Books 

John C. Angus, P.M., Postage and En- 
velopes 

Charles F. Emerson, Sealet 

Daniel A. Hartigan, Sealer 

Lilla D. Stott, Real Estate Transfers 

Telephone 

Amount carried forward 

28 



1383 


.33 


1750 


.00 


1966 


.68 


1560.00 


166 


.64 


333 


.28 


761 


.65 


100 


.00 


100 


.00 


83 


.34 


202 


.50 


24 


.00 


10.00 


415 


.46 


212 


.24 


83 


.33 


125 


.00 


80.33 


23 


.15 


$11880.93 



Amount brought forward 


$11880.93 


Auto hire 


60.00 


Board of Assessors, expenses 


31.00 


Board of Selectmen, expenses 


13.15 


Clerk and Treasurer, sundry expenses 


39.15 


Extra clerical hire 


37.95 


Miscellaneous 


87.87 


Total expenditure 


12150.05 


Balance 


9.95 



$12160.00 $12160.00 



29 





TOWN HOUSE 






Appropriation 




$3000.00 


William C. Brown, Janitor 


$1100.00 




Lighting 




369.25 




Fuel 




562.00 




Equipment and repairs 




583.89 




Police duty 




109.00 




Supplies 




90.70 




Labor 




133.80 




Water 




26.94 




Total expenditure 


2975.58 




Balance 




24.42 





$3000.00 $3000.00 



30 



ELECTION AND REGISTRATION 



Appropriation 




Precinct Officers 




Precinct One 


$ 376.00 


Precinct Two 


208.00 


Precinct Three 


200.50 


Precinct Four 


235.00 


Registrars of Voters 


183.00 


Andover Press, printing and advertising 


391.55 


Voting equipment 


70.00 


Police duty- 


61.50 


Janitor service 


19.05 


Lunches 


35.50 


Transportation 


28.00 


Clerical hire 


32.38 


Miscellaneous 


3.74 

\ 


Total expenditure 


$1844.22 


Balance 


355.78 



$2200.00 



$2200.00 $2200.00 



31 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Appropriation 


$4000.00 


Lotta Johnson, Nurse, salary 


$1500.00 


Lotta Johnson, use of car 


200.00 


Lotta Johnson, Inspector of Slaughtering 


200.00 


Dr. Charles E. Abbott, salary 


75.00 


F. H. Stacey, salary 


50.00 


F. H. Stacey, Schick test 


208.60 


F. H. Stacey, fumigation and supplies 


239.23 


B. T. Haynes, salary 


50.00 


B. T. Haynes, fumigation 


21.00 


Ray S. Youmans, Inspector of Animals 


145.80 


Joseph P. Nolan, Plumbing Inspector 


142.00 


John S. Buchan, Plumbing Inspector 


20.00 


Essex Sanatorium, board of patients 


964.60 


No. Reading Sanatorium, board of patients 


134.28 


A. & P. Tea Co., provisions 


12.38 


Printing 


12.50 


Miscellaneous 


20.05 


Total expenditure 


3955.44 


Balance 


4.56 



$4000.00 $4000.00 



32 



PRINTING 



Appropriation 

The Andover Press, printing 
Dumas & Co., cards 


$1361.00 
75.50 


$1500.00 


Total 
Balance 


1436.50 
63.50 






$1500.00 

$ 100.00 
4.25 


$1500.00 


HAY SCALES 




Appropriation 

William C. Brown, weigher 
Hobbs & Warren, book 


$ 125.00 


Balance 


$ 104.25 
20.75 






$ 125.00 


$ 125.00 



STREET LIGHTING 



Appropriation 

Lawrence Gas Co. 
Balance 


$11000.00 

$10787.13 

212.87 



$11000.00 $11000.00 



33 



TREE WARDEN AND MOTH DEPARTMENT 



MOTH WORK 






Appropriation 




$6000.00 


Edward H. Berry, Supt. 


$1123.91 




Pay rolls 


2789.21 




Team hire 


488.13 




Truck hire 


213.38 




Equipment and repairs 


307.26 




Lead and creosote 


902.30 




Rent 


130.00 




Miscellaneous 


38.62 




Total expenditure 


5992.81 




Balance 


7.19 






$6000.00 


$6000.00 


TREE WARDEN 






Appropriation 




$4000.00 


Edward H. Berry, Warden 


$ 642.10 




Pay rolls 


2278.18 




Equipment and repairs 


622.56 




New Trees 


178.00 




Telephone 


42.70 




Truck hire 


69.00 




Team hire 


34.50 




Rent 


45.00 




Miscellaneous 


51.18 




Creosote 


16.50 




Printing 


7.55 




Total expenditure 


3987.27 




Balance 


12.73 





$4000.00 $4000.00 



34 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



Appropriation, March 1924 






$5200.00 


Appropriation, Land Purchase 






2000.00 


F. A. Swanton, Supt. 






$1450.00 


Pay rolls 






2455.13 


Horse hire 






387.53 


Clark Land Purchase 






2000.00 


Edith P. Sellars, Clerl 






100.00 


Maintenance of grounds 






585.56 


Equipment and repairs 






187.93 


Miscellaneous 






13.24 


Water 






10.01 


Printing and stationery 






10.50 


Total expenditures 






7199.90 


Balance 






.10 




$7200.00 $7200.00 


Receipts 






Sale of lots 


$ 917.25 




Care of lots 


925 


00 




Perpetual care 


708.00 




Interments and use of tomb 


783 


00 




Foundations 


167 


10 




Sale of building 


400 


00 






$3900.35 





35 



STATE TAXES 



Andover's proportion of State Tax 


$20000.00 


Andover's proportion of Highway Tax 


4529.33 


Bank Tax 


1094.64 


Auditing Town Accounts 


480.57 


Corporation Tax 


3.98 


Treasurer of Commonwealth 


$26108.52 



$26108.52 $26108.52 



COUNTY TAX 



Andover's proportion of County Tax 
Walter P. Babb, County Treasurer 



$18525.60 



$18525.60 



$18525.60 18525.60 



DOG TAX 



Received from County Treasurer 
Memorial Hall Library 



$495 . 66 



$495.66 



36 



$495.66 $495.66 



MEMORIAL DAY 



Appropriation $550 . 00 

Jesse S. Billington, Quartermaster $550.00 



POST 99, G. A. R. 



RETIREMENT OF VETERANS 



$550.00 $550.00 



Appropriation $100 . 00 

Jesse S. Billington, Quartermaster $100.00 



$100.00 $100.00 



Appropriation 
Paid to Veteran 


keeper 




$300.00 


$300.00 




$300.00 

$75.00 
75.00 


$300.00 




PUBLIC DUMP 




Appropriation 
Neils Sorenson, 
Balance 




$150.00 



$150.00 $150.00 
37 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation 


$26600.00 


Salaries, engineers 


$775.00 


Salary, permanent chief 


1438.00 


Wages, permanent men 


15207.00 


Wages, call men 


2898.73 


Fire Alarm 


1103.20 


Fuel 


976.04 


Light 


240.47 


Equipment and repairs 


1881.76 


Maintenance building and furnishings 


784.50 


Horses, care of same 


518.81 


Telephones 


109.01 


Janitor, Ballardvale 


100.00 


Tyer Rubber Co., blowing whistle 


300.00 


Miscellaneous 


218.61 


Total expenditure 


26551.13 


Balance 


48.87 




$26600.00 $26600.00 


BRUSH FIRES 




Appropriation 


$1000.00 


Pay rolls 


$1247.75 


Miscellaneous 


26.60 


Transferred from Reserve Fund 


274.35 



$1274.35 $1274.35 



3$ 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Appropriation 




$18250.00 


Frank M. Smith, Chief 


$ 2130.00 




Pay roll, patrolmen 


13111.35 




Wages, special police 


662.46 




Maintenance, motor apparatus 


864.50 




Equipment and repairs 


310.49 




Painting traffic lines 


195.00 




Traffic Beacons 


997.71 




Telephones 


159.61 




Light 


76.81 




Miscellaneous 


135.68 




Total expenditure 


18643.61 




Transferred from Reserve Fund 




393.61 



$18643.61 $18643.61 



SEWER SINKING FUND 



Appropriation $1000 . 00 

Arthur T. Boutwell, Treas. Sinking Fund $1000 . 00 



$1000.00 $1000.00 



39 



ANDOVER POST NO. 8, AMERICAN LEGION 



Appropriation 

Paid for 
Rent 

Janitor service 
Fuel 
Light 


$1000.00 

$470.00 

250.00 

185.50 

84.43 


Total expenditure 
Balance 


999.93 
.07 




$1000.00 $1000.00 



WAR MEMORIAL COMMITTEE 



Appropriation Balance $444.14 

Ripley & LeBoutillier, architects $140. 84 

Balance 303.30 



$444.14 $444.14 



ESSEX COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL 



Appropriation $2883 . 00 

Essex County, maintenance $2882.06 

Balance . 94 



$2883.00 $2883.00 
40 



POMP'S POND RECREATION COMMITTEE 



Appropriation $2000 . 00 



Pope & Cottle Co., building 


$690.00 


Philip L. Hardy, labor 


371.63 


Rolland B. Estabrook, guard 


200.00 


William B. Atwood, guard 


200.00 


John F. McDonough, labor 


148.50 


J. E. Pitman Estate, labor 


152.94 


Donovan & Locke, painting 


44.00 


A. B. True, skiff 


35.75 


C. S. Buchan, supplies 


15.05 


Andover Press, cards 


24.50 


W. C. Crowley, supplies 


6.70 


O'Connell-Ingalls, advertising 


5.95 


Andover Steam Laundry 


2.56 


Total expenditure 


1902.58 


Balance 


97.42 



$2000.00 $2000.00 



41 



INTEREST 




Appropriation 


$41600.00 


Water Loans 


$4842.50 


Sewer Loans 


9888.75 


High School Loans 


2760.00 


Shawsheen Bridge Loan 


356.26 


Main St. Loan 


3600.00 


Shawsheen School Loan 


9775.00 


Tuberculosis Hospital Loan 


1487.50 


Temporary Loans 


6461.08 


Total expenditure 


39171.09 


Balance 


2428.91 



$41600.00 $41600.00 



TEMPORARY LOANS 



Andover National Bank, Note 57 
Andover National Bank, Notes 64-69 
Andover National Bank, Notes 70-71 
Andover National Bank, Notes 72-75 



Andover National Band, paid 



Rate 



4 


.27 


$30000.00 


4 


.15 


150000.00 


3 


.36 


50000.00 


2, 


49 


100000.00 




$330000.00 






330000.00 



42 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Appropriation . $600 . 00 

Old School House, B. Vale, equipment and 

repairs $479.59 

A. P. Wright, Field Driver 25.00 

Sealer Weights and Measures, supplies 3.15 

E. M. Lundgren, returning deaths 
M.J. Mahoney, returning deaths 
E. L. Bennett, returning deaths 
Charles F. Keefe, returning deaths 
Dr. P. J. Look, returning births 
Dr. W. D. Walker, returning births 
Dr. E. D. Lane, returning births 
Dr. J. J. Daly, returning births 
Dr. P. W. Blake, returning births 
Dr. G. S. Allen, returning births 
Dr. J. F. Howard, returning births 
Margaret M. Sparhawk, returning death 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



19 


.00 


3 


.00 




.75 




.75 


11 


.75 


9 


.50 


6 


.50 


3 


.50 


1 


.25 


1 


25 


1 


00 




25 


566 


24 


33 


76 


$600 


00 $600.00 



43 



REDEMPTION OF BONDS 



Appropriation 


$62500.00 


Six High School Bonds 


$6000.00 


Ten Water Bonds 


10000.00 


Twelve Sewer Bonds 


12000.00 


Twenty Main Street Bonds 


20000.00 


Twelve Shawsheen School Bonds 


12000.00 


Shawsheen Bridge Bonds 


2500.00 



$62500.00 $62500.00 



INSURANCE 



Appropriation, Fire 

Appropriation, Workmen's Compensation 

Merrimack Mut. Fire Ins. Co. 
Smart & Flagg, Agents 



$4000.00 
2500.00 



$5070.55 
89.90 



Total 
Balance 



5160.45 
1339.55 



6500.00 6500.00 



44 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



The Poor Department has, during the past year, been given 
the same careful consideration as in previous years. 

All cases of distress have been investigated and if found worthy, 
relief has been given. 

The buildings of our Town Home are in good repair and no 
extraordinary expenses are anticipated during the current year, 
although small repairs and minor changes and additions may have 
to be made. 

Every effort, consistent with the economical operation of our 
Town Home, is made by our matron to assure the comfort of our 
inmates and we feel that this division of our Poor Department is 
being operated efficiently and with economy. 

FRANK H. HARDY 
GHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Overseers of the Poor 



45 



ALMSHOUSE EXPENSES 



Appropriation 




$7000.00 


Mrs. F. A. Swanton, matron 


$900.00 




Wages, employees 


1259.03 




Groceries and provisions 


3031.40 




Fuel 


650.00 




Light 


211.49 




Equipment and repairs 


350.07 




Fred A. Swanton, board of horse 


216.80 




Maintenance, buildings and grounds 


52. 98 




Miscellaneous 


123.40 




Water 


80.00 




Funeral expenses 


55.00 




Medicine and medical aid 


59.40 




Clothing 


45.76 




Telephone 


10.50 






$7045.83 




Transferred from Reserve Fund 




45.83 



Total expenditure 



$7045.83 $7045.83 



46 



Appropriation 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF 



$2000.00 



$1303.53 
696.47 



$2000.00 $2000.00 



Appropriation 

Total expenditure 
Balance 



STATE AID 



$500.00 



$288.00 
212.00 



$500.00 $500.00 



OUTSIDE RELIEF 



Appropriation 

Paid out of Almshouse 
Paid other cities and towns 
Paid State 
Paid account of State 

Total expenditure 
Balance 







$6000.00 


$3084.28 




1141 


41 




625 


42 




616 


00 




5467 


11 




532 


89 





$6000.00 $6000.00 



47 



AIDING MOTHERS WITH DEPENDENT CHILDREN 

Appropriation $7000 . 00 

Town cases $3726.00 

Paid other towns 559 . 88 

Paid account other towns 1331 . 75 



Total expenditure 5617.63 

Balance 1382.37 



$7000.00 $7000.00 



STATISTICS OF ANDOVER ALMSHOUSE 

Number of inmates January 1, 1924 9 

Number admitted 4 

Number of deaths 1 

Number of inmates January 1, 1925 12 

Number between one and ten I 

Number between twenty and thirty 1 

Number between sixty and seventy 3 

Number between seventy and eighty 3 

Number between eighty and ninety 4 

MRS. F. A. SWANTON, Matron 



48 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



The Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery submit the following 
report: — 

The care of the Spring Grove Cemetery has been kept up to 
its high standard, both in appearance and simplicity. 

Over 750 feet of cement curbing has been laid on some of the 
avenues on the west side, giving them a more finished appearance. 

Five acres of land hav e been cleared and sowed , making more 
available land for lots. 

The open winter of last year killed the grass on many lots and 
much time and money were spent on reseeding same. There are 
still several of these lots that will have to be taken care of in the 
spring. 

Two more rows of small pines were set out on the west side. 

There are only 3 four-lot graves and a few single graves left 
on the west side of the cemetery. The Trustees hope as lots are 
purchased on the east side, same will be put in perpetual care when 
sold. 

The Trustees ask for $6000.00 to carry on the work and plans 
for further development as the town is growing and all new work 
will have to be done on the east side of the cemetery. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER I. MORSE, Chairman 
DAVID R. LAWSON 
DANIEL H. POOR 
FRED A. SWANTON 
EVERETT M. LUNDGREN 
JOHN W. STARK 
FRED E. CHEEVER 

Fred E. Cheever, Clerk of the Board of Trustees. 

49 



STATISTICS OF SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



Number of lots sold as per last report 558 

Number of lots sold in 1924 19 

Total number sold 577 

Total number single graves sold 205 

Number of interments as per last report 1688 

Number of interments in 1924 68 

Total number of interments 1756 

FRED A. SWANTON, Superintendent 



50 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S REPORT 



To the Board of Selectmen : — 

Gentlemen: — I hereby submit my annual report tor the year 
ending December 31, 1924. 

Number of cattle inspected 1414 
Number of swine inspected 521 
Number of sheep inspected 3 
Number of stables inspected 139 
Number of cattle condemned, affected with tubercu- 
losis • 8 
Number of stables disinfected 7 
Interstate cattle identified and released 238 
Number of dogs quarantined 1 1 
Number of dogs affected with rabies 

Fatal infectious diseases of poultry are quite prevalent through- 
out the country and if occurrence of same exists I should be 
notified. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RAY S. YOUMANS, D.V.M. 

Inspector of Animals 



51 



REPORT OF BUILDING INSPECTOR 



To the Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit my report of the Building 
Inspector's Department for the year 1924. 

One hundred eighty-three permits were granted to erect and 
remodel the following buildings. 

Dwellings 42 

Two-Family Dwellings 12 

Garages 43 

Additions and Alterations 43 

Business Blocks 1 

Sheds 17 

Hen Houses 7 

Camps 10 

Small Stores 2 

Storehouses 1 

Bleachers 2 

Small Office Buildings 2 

Schools 1 

183 

During the year three licenses to operate passenger elevators 
were issued and a general observation test was made of every 
elevator in town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES T. GILLIARD 

Building Inspector 



52 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Andover. 

Gentlemen: — 

I herewith submit the report of the Andover Fire Department 
from January 1st, 1924, to January 1st, 1925. 

During this time the Department has answered 125 bell and 58 
still alarms. 

It has laid 16400 feet of 2^-inch and 2015 feet of %-inch hose, 
using 1840 gallons of chemical and 1095 feet of ladders. 

The value of buildings and contents where fire occurred was 
$285,500.00, loss on buildings and contents $18,724.24, mostly 
covered by insurance. 

The equipment consists of one combination hose and chemical, 
one combination, hose, chemical and pump, one ladder truck, 
one hose wagon, two sleds, four sets of harnesses, two tipcarts, 
one exercise wagon, one brush fire truck, 6000 feet of 2J^-inch 
hose, two horses. 

During the year one life was lost by fire. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES F. EMERSON 

Chief of the A ndover Fire Departmen t 



53 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



REPORT OF CHIEF 

To the Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen : — 

I hereby submit the report of the Police Department for the 
year ending December 31, 1924. 

Whole number of arrests 194. Males 191 ; Females 3 

OFFENSES 

Assault 12 

Drunks 4 38 

Drunk and disturbance 2 

Violation of fish and game law 10 

Non attendance at School 1 

Escaped from and returned to Tewksbuiy Infirmary 2 

Manslaughter 2 

Insane 6 

Town ordinance 1 

Allowing minor child to peddle 1 

Malicious mischief 10 

Threats to do bodily harm 2 

Selling mortgaged property 2 

Gaming on the Lord's Day 4 

Attempt to take life 1 

Indecent exposure 1 

Violation motor vehicle law. Minor offences 64 

Operating while under the influence of liquor 13 

Operating without proper registration 2 

Operating without license 10 

Operating so as to endanger life and safety 5 

Operating without consent of owner 5 

54 



DISPOSITION OF CASES 






Appealed 




6 


Paid fines in lower court 




114 


Probation 




13 


On file 




16 


Discharged 




11 


Committed to Danvers Infirmary 




6 


Committed to Tewksbury Infirmary 




3 


Committed to House of Correction 




7 


Suspended sentence to House of Correction 




3 


Suspended sentence to State Farm 




2 


Returned to parents 




4 


Continued for sentence 




1 


Held for Grand Jury 




2 


Arrested for out-of-town officers 




6 


MISCELLANEOUS 






Fines paid in Lower Court 


$1487.50 


Fines paid in Superior Court 


416 


.60 


Value of property stolen 


950 


.00 


Value of property recovered 


1500 


.00 


Police equipment 


800 


.00* 


Traffic signs and flashers 


1000 


.00 


Dead bodies caied for 




8 


Doors found open and secured 


: 


L34 


SUPERIOR COURT FINDINGS 




No bill found 




1 


Cases pending 




5 


On probation 




3 


Paid fines 




6 


Nol-prossed 




2: 


FRANK 


M. SMITH 






Chief of Police- 



55 



BOARD OF HEALTH NURSE 
AND AGENT 



To the Board of Health. 

There have been 229 cases of contagious diseases reported, 
classified and compared with 1923 and 1922 as follows: 





1924 


1923 


1922 


Influenza 


4 


51 


125 


Tuberculosis 


12 


6 


11 


Incephalitis Lethargica 











Typhoid Fever 


1 








Scarlet Fever 


51 


15 


15 


Diphtheria 


2 


8 


16 


Chicken Pox 


80 


18 


14 


Whooping Cough 


7 


46 


75 


Measles 


13 


16 


44 


Mumps 


45 


5 


7 


Suppurative Conjunctivitis 











Lobar Pneumonia 


8 


15 


14 


Anterio Poliomyelitis 


1 


1 


2 


German Measles 


2 


3 


1 


Septic Sore Throat 








2 


Ophthalmia Neonatorum 





2 


1 


Gonorrhea 


2 


5 


1 


Syphilis 


1 


4 


1 


Rabies 





18 


1 



229 213 328 

56 



Deaths from Contagious Diseases 



Tuberculosis 

Typhoid Fever 

Tetanus 

Measles 

Lobar Pneumonia 

Scarlet Fever 

Diphtheria 

Influenza 



1924 


1923 


1922 


9 


2 


5 





























2 





3 




















2 


3 






13 6 8 



As one will see by reading this report we have had a lower 
number of contagious and infectious diseases this year than we 
had last. Many of us may have been unaware that we have 
passed through a very serious time with an epidemic of scarlet 
fever all about us. There have been several hundred cases of 
this disease all around Andover while we have only had 51 cases 
for the year and at no time did it get into an epidemic stage. 

In combining all calls and visits I have made 1654; which were 
practically of the same nature as the previous year. We have 
had one typhoid case this year which was in our opinion an im- 
ported one. I think our daily papers have been most helpful to 
the public on this particular subject in such a critical time, as 
there were many fatalities. Many cases of typhoid fever were 
caused by people eating raw oysters that were infected with the 
typhoid baccilli. I know of no better prevention of disease out- 
side of that provided only by the medical profession than to 
follow the instruction given by capable authorities on care and 
cleanliness of foods and their locations. 

It seems the Schick test and treatment of the same has been 
most effectual; as we have had only two cases of diphtheria, 
neither of which had the test. Diphtheria still remains the most 
important of contagious diseases, because of its high death rate. 

While attending a lecture for nurses in the early spring, I heard 
one of the speakers say that infantile paralysis is not a recent 
disease but existed before Christ. Statistics show us that the 
first real epidemic that we know of happened in 1894 and really 

57 



what was considered a big epidemic occurred in New York in 1907 
and 1908 and since that time we have had epidemics on a much 
larger scale elsewhere in the United States. In 1910 this disease 
was made reportable in this state. It is interesting to watch this 
disease as it seems as if there was a great number of cases fol- 
lowed by a drop, during a period of four years, and then an epi- 
demic has pretty generally followed. The year 1920 was supposed 
to have been the maximum year, therefore 1924 was again 
the high-rate year for infantile paralysis in Massachusetts. 
People were frantic in 1916 when we had 1,927 cases throughout 
the state because they know that this malady claims the highest 
mortality among infectious diseases. The virus is transmitted 
through the saliva, therefore cleanliness is the watchword if one 
does not want to spread this disease. We have had one case of 
infantile paralysis this year, which proved fatal. Many of our 
previous cases were helped by trained women from the Harvard 
Commission. 

Tuberculosis has claimed several of its victims this year in 
Andover. The public are beginning to realize the efforts that 
the many public and private associations are making to help us 
all to combat this most common of all diseases of which the com- 
munity have to come in contact with so many times during the 
year. 

Perhaps there has been no more gratifying point to the public at 
large than to have watched the steady decrease of infant mor- 
tality. Since 1920 it has steadily decreased each year and I wish 
to state that 1924 we had a lower infant death rate than 1923. 

The question of foodstuffs has been of vital importance in 
the past years. I have had many complaints of people who 
thought that they had purchased things that were not fit to eat. 
Investigation showed that some of these complaints were just, 
while others were not. On Memorial day the Board of Health 
confiscated some two hundred cocoanuts which were destroyed. 
Although the shells looked good the inside of the cocoanut was in 
a very bad state of decay. As the purchase of a cocoanut is one 
of the big events for the children of Andover on this particular 
day, the Board of Health must have been the cause of a great 
many disappointments to the children, but may also have save 
them from some sickness and pain. 

58 



As inspector of slaughtering I wish to state that all of my in- 
spections were passed as suitable for food. 

The people last year were very desirous of some method for the 
collection of garbage. As there was a way agreed upon, I wish to 
give a little advice and also state what I have seen since this 
collection started. The first few weeks, in going to the place 
where this garbage is left to be fed to pigs, I noticed that there 
was very little glass, crockery, silverware, tin and other foreign 
edible matter for pigs, but as the time has gone on it is really 
surprising how callous the public have grown in this matter. If 
the public wish to be of help in this dilemma they should in the 
coming year be more careful as to what goes into their garbage 
pail. Not only has this been one great fault, but I wish to advise 
as to the use of disinfectants to be very careful to rinse out the 
receptacles well, after the use of carbolic acid. 

Brooks and ponds, on account of the small amount of rain- 
fall last year were the cause of a lot of trouble and propaganda. 
There was a lot of talk concerning Pomp's Pond which was all 
unfounded. Pomp's Pond was visited by the Board of Health at 
least once a week and at no time did we find conditions such as to 
order the closing of swimming landing. At one time when the 
water was at its lowest ebb and the wind had changed, it is true, 
there was an annoying odor but this was not detrimental to 
health. 

Stony Brook gave us some trouble on account of stagnant 
water. We received a letter from somebody's attorney which 
caused us to make a thorougher examination. Our plumbing in- 
spector put blueing in all the sewer mains but found no leaks 
in these pipes. The Board of Public Works aided us in our search 
and the Fire Department flushed the brook out on Central street. 

All communicable diseases must be reported to the Board of 
Health within twenty-four hours' time after their discovery. 
Any person concealing a contagious or infectious disease that is 
reportable by law will be prosecuted accordingly. 

Respectfully submitted 

LOTTA JOHNSON, R.N. 



59 



CORNELL FUND 



Principal Fund 




$5000.00 


Deposited in Andover Savings Bank 


$1000.00 




Deposited in Essex Savings Bank 


1000.00 




Deposited in Broadway Savings Bank 


1000 .00 




Central Savings Bank 


1000.00 




City Institution for Savings 


1000.00 









$5000.00 


Receipts 






Balance from last account 


$207.19 




Savings Bank interest 


245.00 


$452.19 


Expenditures 






Expended for coal and wood 


$193.20 




Balance on hand 


$258.99 





$452.19 

JOHN C. ANGUS 
CHARLES N. MARLAND 
W. DACRE WALKER 

Trustees 



60 



TOWN OF ANDOVER — JURY LIST 

(June 30th, 1924) 



Abbott, Newton S. 
Armitage, Charles H. 
Averill, George L. 
Bailey, Charles L. 
Bailey, Henry B. 
Bailey, Ralph 
Bailey, Samuel H. 
Bancroft, William A. 
Bassett, Arthur W. 
Baxter, George H. 
Barrett, Patrick J. 
Boutwell, Edward W. 
Boutwell, Everett S. 
Burns, David F. 
Cates, A. Lincoln 
Cannon, Gordon R. 
Carter, George M. 
Chase, Herbert F. 
Clark, Herbert 
Cole, Joseph F. 
Cole, Roscoe K. 
Coleman, Walter H. 
Comeau, Arthur N. 
Coutts, William C. 
Dane, George A. 
Dick, Alexander 
Donald, Walter S. 
Doyle, Thomas F. 
Disbrow, George W. 
Doherty, Martin 



Carpenter 


River Rd. 


Operative 


124 Haverhill St. 


Farmer 


Reservation St. 


Retired 


Main St. 


Farmer 


High Plain Rd. 


Farmer 


Porter Rd. 


Farmer 


Porter Rd. 


Retired 


Lowell June. 


Clerk 


Hidden Rd. 


Gardener 


43 Lowell St. 


Ins. Collector 


88 Chestnut St. 


Farmer 


Pleasant St. 


Farmer 


Pleasant St. 


Signal Operator 


Chester St. 


Gardener 


47 Whittier St. 


Salesman 


54 Salem St. 


Farmer 


High Plain Rd. 


Storekeeper 


Summer St. 


Carpenter 


Tewksbury St. 


Retired 


Hidden Rd. 


Carpenter 


115 Elm St. 


Retired 


42 Chestnut St. 


Carpenter 


Highland Rd. 


Retired 


60 Maple Ave. 


Dresser 


Andover St. 


Retired 


3 Cuba St. 


Retired 


Union St. 


Fireman 


Holt Rd. 


Farmer 


Chandler Rd. 


Retired 


Harding St. 



61 



Dunnells, George C. 
Fairweather, James D. 
Fleming, Edward, Jr. 
Flint, Edwin M. 
Flaherty, Michael J . 
Garland, George M. 
Gordon, Alexander 
Hannon, Patrick J. 
Harrington, Daniel F. 
Hnl, Charles A. 
Hill, Paul 
Hill, Ira B. 
Hilton, Henry 
Holt, George A. 
Hovey, James H. 
Hulme, Samuel P. 
Jaques, Robert 
Jaquith, Newton 
Keane, Mark M. 
Kendall, Frank H. E. 
Lawson, George D. 
Lawson, John B. 
Lee, Harry F. 
Lindsay, J. William 
Lynch, Joseph F. 
Mahoney, Timothy J. 
May, George M. 
McDonald, Frank S. 
Mclntyre, William D. 
Miller, George R. 
Mosher, James R. 
Morrissey, William B. 
Nason, Harry G. 
Newton, Charles M. 
Nolan, Joseph R. 
Noyes, John L. 
O'Donnell, Hugh F. 
O'Donnell, John A. 
Petrie, George B. 



Watchman 

Gardener 

Chauffeur 

Farmer 

Spinner 

Electrician 

Belt Maker 

Retired 

Farmer 

Electrician 

Farmer 

Night Watchman 

Operative 

Carpenter 

Carpenter 

Real Estate 

Farmer 

Electrician 

Clerk 

Carpenter 

Retired 

Machinist 

Farmer 

Retired 

Switchman 

Clerk 

Painter 

P. O. Clerk 

Clerk 

Salesman 

Clerk 

Electrician 

Carpenter 

Poultry Business 

Plumber 

Farmer 

Moulder 

Switchman 

Janitor 



6 Sutherland St. 

15 Abbot St. 

54 Haverhill St. 

Pleasant St 

River St. 

Prospect Hill Rd. 

82 Poor St. 

Elm St. 

Osgood St. 

13 Chestnut St. 

Jenkins Rd. 

Lupine Rd. 

67 High St. 

8 Summer St. 

Main St. 

Brook St. 

River St. 

Main St. 

Moraine St. 

7 Chestnut St. 

35 Maple Ave. 

9 Chestnut St. 

Pleasant St. 

Porter Rd. 

Tewksbury St. 

Whittier St. 

Main St. 

129 Chestnut St. 

Andover St. 

Center St. 

21 Balmoral St. 

66 Poor St. 

Clark Rd. 

Boutwell Rd. 

7 Cuba St. 

Love joy Rd. 

Center St. 

Marland St. 

Chickering Ct. 



62 



Poor, Daniel H. 
Pike, Warren G. 
Pitman, Joseph I. 
Piatt, Henry W. 
Purcell, James F. 
Reilly, Bernard F. 
Remmes, Joseph T. 
Rennie, George 
Riley, John A. 
Riley, Joseph A. 
Robinson, William C. 
Scott, David M. 
Shaw, Irving R. 
Sherry, Frank J. 
Sherry, Richard 
Stott, Joseph E. 
Stewart, James 
Taylor, Loren E. 
Todd, Henry 
Trow, Henry J. 
Valentine, Franklin S. 
Walker, Salmond G. 
Ward, George D. 
Whitman, David 0. 



Wool Sorter 

Farmer 

Carpenter 

Overseer 

Baker 

Gardener 

Electrician 

Farmer 

Retired 

Wool Sorter 

Blacksmith 

Warp Dresser 

Wool Sorter 

Pattern Maker 

Moulder 

Clerk 

Retired 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Wool Sorter 

Clerk 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Rubber Worker 



Andover St. 

Laurel Lane 

17 Summer St. 

Center St. 

36 Elm St. 

79 Haverhill St. 

Missionary Lane 

Argilla Rd. 

Center St. 

Center St. 

427 No. Main St. 

19 Avon St. 

High St. 

Andover St. 

Chester St. 

High St. 

Red Spring Rd. 

1 1 Washington Ave. 

60 Poor St. 

River St. 

20 Elm St. 

Chester St. 

Lowell St. 

9 Pine St . 



63 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



We herewith submit our annual report: 
Number of males assessed, 2761 



Personal estate 


$4,710,292.00 




Real estate 


12,098,950.00 


16,809,242.00 






Poll tax 


5,522.00 




Tax on Personal estate 


130,478.21 




Tax on Real estate 


335,143.02 


471,143.23 
2,058.73 


Moth assessment 




Abatements 






Personal estate 


420.94 




Real estate 


508.98 


929.92 


Rate of taxation per 1000 


27.70 


Number of 






Horses assessed 




362 


Cows assessed 




867 


Neat cattle 




140 


Swine 




83 


Fowl 




21140 


Dwellings 




2122 


Acres of land 




17664 



FRANK H. HARDY, Chairman 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW MrfERNEN 

Board of A ssessors 



64 



MUNICIPAL PROPERTIES AND PUBLIC 
IMPROVEMENTS 





Land and 


Equip, and 


Total 




Buildings 


other Property 


Town Hall 


$62900 


$8000 


$70900 


Fire Department 


41500 


30000 


71500 


Police Department 




1000 


1000- 


Schools 


443500 


10000 


453500' 


Library 


42000 


10000 


52000 


Water Department 


84450 


325600 


410050 


Sewer Department 


8000 


475000 


483000 


Highway Department 


4500 


5275 


9775 


Tree Warden and Moth De- 








partment 




5000 


5000 


Almshouse 


41000 


7500 


48500 


Park Department 


32200 




32200 


Cemeteries 


18000 


500 


18500 


Weights and Measures 




350 


350 


Hay Scales 




350 


350 


Old Schoolhouse, Ballard- 








vale 


5000 




5000 


Punchard School Fund 




77000 


77000' 


Memorial Hall Invest. 








Funds 




73491 


74217 


Other Unproductive Proper- 








ties 








9 acres land, Burnham Rd. 


2500 




2500 


9 acres land, Indian Ridge 








(gravel pit) 


3000 




3000 


Totals 


$788550 


$1029066 


$1818342 



65 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR 



1921 



Amount of warrant 
Interest 
Collected taxes 
Collected interest 



$276.93 
28.94 



$276.93 
28.94 







$305.87 


$305.87 




1922 






Amount of warrant 






$14294.05 


Added to warrant 






6.91 


Moth work 






125.25 


Interest 






1269.12 


Collected taxes 




$14114.58 




Collected moth 




125.25 


' 


Collected interest 




1269.12 




Abated taxes 




170.80 




Uncollected taxes 




15.58 






$15695.33 


$15695.33 




1923 






Balance of warrant — per 


1924 Town 


Report 


$52977.42 


Less error on item "Uncol 


lected" 




2140.28 




50837.14 


Added to warrant 






50.11 


Interest 






1737.98 


Moth work 






246.70 


Additional moth work 






2.85 


Collected taxes 




$40324.16 




Collected moth work 




216.90 




Collected interest 




1737.98 




Taxes abated 




764.99 




Uncollected taxes 




9798.10 




Uncollected moth 




32.65 





$52874.78 $52874.78 



66 



1924 



Amount of warrant 
Added to warrant 
Interest 
Moth work 
Collected taxes 
Collected moth work 
Interest 
Taxes abated 
Taxes uncollected 
Moth work uncollected 





$471143.23 


• 


724.81 




162.15 




2058.73 


$413239.74 




1847.18 




162.15 




929.92 




57698.38 




211.55 





$474088.92 $474088.92 



SUMMARY COLLECTOR'S CASH ACCOUNT, 1924 

Amount Collected and Paid to Town Treasurer 





Taxes 


Moth Work 


Interest 


Total 


1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 


$276.93 

14114.58 

40324.16 

413239.74 


125.25 

216.90 

1847.18 


$28.94 
1269.12 
1737.98 

162.15 


$305.87 

15508.95 

42279.04 

415249.07 




$467955.41 


$2189.33 


$3198.19 


$473342.93 






WILI 


.IAM B. C 

Colle 


HEEVER 

ctor of Taxes 



67 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Liabilities 

Water Bonds, 4% ($17000 due 1925) $43000.00 
Water Bonds, 3^% (3000 due 1925) 26000.00 

Water Bonds, 4%% (4000 due 1925) 32000.00 

Sewer Bonds, 4% (5000 due 1925) 60000.00 

Sewer Bonds, 5% (2000 due 1925) 32000.00 

Sewer Bonds, 4^% (5000 due 1925) 145000.00 

High School Loans, 4% (6000 due 1925) 63000.00 
Shawsheen Bridge Loan, 4%% (2500 due 

1925) 5000.00 

Main St. Loan, 4^% (20000 due 1925) 60000.00 
Shawsheen School Bonds, 4^% (12000 

due 1925) 218000.00 

Essex Sanatorium Loan, 4J^% (7000 due 

1925) 70000.00 







$754000.00 


Assets 






Cash, General Fund 


$78151.58 




Cash, Water Loan 


4321.52 




Cash, Outfall Sewer 


12732". 14 




Cash, Shawsheen School 


7750.14 




Cash, McCarthy Land Taking 


750.00 




Cash, War Bonus Surplus 


4299.01 




Cash, War Memorial Committee 


140.84 




Cash, Memorial Hall Library 


744.66 


$108889.89 






Uncollected Taxes 


67512.06 




Uncollected Moth Work 


244.20 


$67756.26 






Amount carried forward 


$176646.15 



68 



Amount brought forward 


$176646.15 


Commonwealth, State Aid 


$288.00 


Commonwealth, Temporary Aid 


410.00 


Commonwealth, Mothers' Aid 


863.66 


Towns, Mothers' Aid 


260.00 


Sewer Assessments 


5553.30 


Sinking Funds 


46884.05 


Water Rates due Jan. 1, 1925 


9929.80 




&AA1QQ Ol 




i(J>Ut:Ioo . Ol 


Balance against Town 


$513165.04 




$754000.00 



69 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 

Dr. 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1924, General Fund $31942.80 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1924, Water Loan 6882 . 97 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1924, Main St. Sidewalk 1160.52 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1924, Roger's Brook 985.20 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1924, Outfall Sewer 8739.53 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1924, Shawsheen School 187575.95 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1924, McCarthy Land Taking 750.00 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1924, Memorial Committee 444.14 

Commonwealth, Corporation Tax 65366.40 

Commonwealth, Income Tax 33106.03 

Commonwealth, Bank Tax 3895.36 

Commonwealth, Reimbursement Land Taxes 225.22 

Commonwealth, Street Railway Tax 622.35 

Commonwealth, Civilian War Poll Tax 1011.00 

Commonwealth, Soldiers' Exemption 12.43 

Commonwealth, Surplus War Bonus Funds 4299.01 

Commonwealth, School Tuition 318.66 

Commonwealth, Industrial Schools 105.97 

Commonwealth, Mothers' Aid 1364.25 

Commonwealth, Temporary Aid 1061 . 75 

Commonwealth, State Aid 386.00 

Commonwealth, Tuberculosis Subsidy 309 . 28 

Commonwealth, Moth Work 56 . 00 

Commonwealth, Hawkers' Licenses 112.00 

Essex County, Dog Tax 495.66 

Andover National Bank, Notes 300000.00 

Collector's Department 467955 . 41 

Interest on Taxes 3198 . 19 

Moth Work 2189.33 

Board of Public Works, Water Rates 42284 . 32 

Board of Public Works, Service Pipe 7069. 78 

Board of Public Works, Sidewalks 5564 . 27 

Board of Public Works, Highway 21.15 

American Woolen Co., Outfall Sewer 50000.00 



Amount carried forward 



70 



$1229510.93 



account with the town of Andover 

Cr. 



Orders paid 




School Department 


$126459.81 


Shawsheen School 


179104.51 


Town Officers 


12150.05 


Town House 


2975.58 


Police Department 


18643.61 


Fire Department 


26551.13 


Brush Fires 


1274.35 


Board of Health 


3995.44 


Garbage 


114.30 


Spring Grove Cemetery 


7199.90 


Printing 


1436.50 


Insurance 


5160.45 


Election and Registration 


1844.22 


Tree Warden 


3987.27 


Moth Department 


5992.81 


Street Lighting 


10787.13 


Highway Department 


85523.91 


Main St. Sidewalk 


879.87 


Sewer Dept. Maintenance 


5969.40 


Sewer Dept. Construction 


2920.08 


Outfall Sewer 


48579.61 


Sewer Sinking Fund 


1000.00 


Poor St. Sewer 


5341.00 


Magnolia Ave. Sewer 


1035.53 


Water Dept. Maintenance 


33492.17 


Water Dept. Construction 


17564.81 


Water Extension, North St. 


19419.28 


Almshouse Expenses 


7045.83 


Outside Relief 


5467.11 


Mothers' Aid 


5617.63 


Soldiers' Relief 


1303.53 


State Aid 


288.00 


Park Department 


1477.34 


Plays tead 


4046.96 


Roger's Brook 


933.40 


Interest 


39171.09 


Water Loan Bonds 


10000.00 


Amount carried forward 


$704753.61 



71 



GEORGE A. HIGGINS, Treas., in 
Dr. 



Amount brought forward 



$1229510.93 

City of Lawrence, Outfall Sewer 2502 . 27 

Sundries, Outfall Sewer 69 . 95 

Sewer Dept., Assessments 787.73 

Sewer Dept., Interest on Assessments 150.48 

Sewer Dept., Construction 3093.79 

Town House, Rentals 869 . 00 

Police Department, Wagon 35 . 00 
Spring Grove Cemetery 

Sale of lots 992.25 

Care of lots 1633.00 

Interments and use of tomb 783 . 00 

Foundations 167 . 10 

Sale of buildings 400.00 

Board of Health, Licenses 24.00 

Building Inspector, Elevator Licenses 3.00 

Liquor Licenses 2 . 00 ' 

George A. Higgins, Town Clerk's Fees 282 . 50 

Almshouse 344.00 

Outside Aid, Reimbursement 249.97 

Towns, Mothers' Aid 644 . 66 

Soldiers' Relief, Reimbursement 40.00 

School Dept., Continuation School 1286.60 

School Dept., Tuition and Supplies 245.00 

Trial Justice Court, Fines 357 . 50 

Old Schoolhouse, Ballardvale, Rentals 350.00 

Tree Warden , Labor 272.51 

Smart & Flagg, Insurance Refund 13.54 

Phillips Academy, Street Lighting 460 . 00 

Hay Scales 50.00 

Essex Sanatorium Loan 70000 . 00 

Essex Sanatorium Premium and Interest 849 . 53 

Andover National Bank, Interest on Deposits 8045.34 

Total $1324514.65 



72 



account with the town of Andover 

Cr. 



A mount brought forward 


$704753.61 


Sewer Loan Bonds 


$12000.00 


High School Bonds 


6000.00 


Main Street Bonds 


20000.00 


Shawsheen Bridge Bonds 


2500.00 


Shawsheen School Bonds 


12000.00 


Miscellaneous 


566.24 


Retirement of Veterans 


300.00 


Pomp's Pond Baths 


1902.58 


Hay Scales 


104.25 


Public Dump 


75.00 


Memorial Hall Library 


4251.00 


Andover Post, No. 8, American Legion 


999.93 


Division of Forestry, Fire Tower 


300.00 


War Memorial Committee 


140.84 


Memorial Day 


550.00 


Post 99, G. A. R. 


100.00 


Essex Sanatorium, Maintenance 


2882.06 


Essex Sanatorium, Construction 


71565.13 


County Tax 


18525.60 


Commonwealth, Bank Tax 


1094.64 


Commonwealth, Corporation Tax 


3.98 


Commonwealth, State Tax 


20000.00 


Commonwealth, Highway *Tax 


4529.33 


Commonwealth, Municipal Audit 


480.57 


Andover National Bank, Notes 


330000.00 


Total Expenditures 


$1215624.76 


alance on hand January 1, 1925 




General Fund 


78151.58 


Water Loan 


4321.52 


Outfall Sewer 


12732.14 


Shawsheen School 


7750.14 


McCarthy Land Taking 


750.00 


War Bonus Surplus 


4299.01 


Memorial Committee 


140.84 


Memorial Hall Library 


744.66 




10R£ftQ RO 




1U0007 . 07 




$1324514.65 



73 



Richardson Fund — Shawsheen Village School 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1924 $1575.46 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 79.72 

$1655.18 

Cr. 

F.Gardner 400.00 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 1255 . 18 

$1655.18 

Draper Fund — School 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1924 $1050.62 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 53. 15 

$1103.77 

Cr. 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 1103.77 

$1103.77 

Edward Taylor Fund — Fuel 

Dr. 
Balance, January 1, 1924 $332.84 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 16.82 

$349.66 

Cr. 
Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 349 . 66 

$349.66 

Varnum Lincoln Spelling Fund 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1924 $556.66 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 27.15 

$583.81 

Cr. 
Henry C. Sanborn, Supt. 20.00 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 563.81 

$583.81 



74 



Isaac Giddings Burial Ground Fund 

Dr. 

Balance January 1, 1924 $1000.00 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 50 . 62 

$1050.62 

Cr. 
Jonathan E. Holt, Trustee 50.62 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 1000 . 00 

$1050.62 

Dr. Edward C. Conroy School Fund 

Dr. 
Balance January 1, 1924 $265.91 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 13 . 17 

$279.08 

Cr. 
N. C. Hamblin 10.00 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 269 . 08 

$279.08 

Holt Fund — School 

Dr. 
Balance, January 1, 1924 $193.48 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 9. 77 

$203.25 

Cr. 
Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 203 . 25 

$203 . 25 

Abbie M. Smart Special Cemetery Fund 

Dr. 
Andover Savings Bank $1097 . 00 

$1097.00 

Cr. 
George D. Millett 25 . 00 

Deposit, Andover Savings Bank 1072.00 

$1097.00 

75 



Cemetery Fund 

Perpetual Care 

Dr. 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1924 $32679.54 

Andover Savings Bank, interest 1705.31 

Deposits for Perpetual Care 3775.00 

Cr. 

Spring Grove Cemetery, for care of lots 708 . 00 

Private Cemeteries, for care of lots 754.85 

Deposits, Andover Savings Bank 36697.00 



$38159.85 



$38159.85 



76 



AUDITORS' CERTIFICATE 



We have examined the accounts of the several town officers and 
find them correctly cast, with satisfactory vouchers for all pay- 
ments. 

The Funds in hands of the Treasurer have been verified and 
Bank Balances have been reconciled with Cash Book. Funds in 
Trust have been verified and accounts of Trustees examined. 
The accounts of the Tax Collector were examined and collections 
agree with Treasurer's account. The uncollected taxes were 
examined but the Auditors were unable to make a correct veri- 
fication of the Collector's account. 

The accounts of the Board of Public Works were examined. 
The recommendation of the State Auditor in regard to keeping 
controlling accounts on water bills, etc., has not as yet been 
followed. 

The Town Treasurer has on deposit in the Andover National 
Bank and cash on hand : 

General Fund $78151.58 

Water Loan 4321.52 

Outfall Sewer 12732.14 

Shawsheen School 7750.14 

McCarthy Land Taking 750 . 00 

Memorial Committee 140 . 84 

War Bonus Surplus 4299 . 01 

Memorial Hall Library 744 . 66 



$108889.89 
JOHN S. ROBERTSON 
HARRY SELLARS 
LOUIS S. FINGER 

Auditors 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 18th day of February, 
1925. Chester W. Holland 

Notary Public 
My Commission expires August 9, 1929 

77 



PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 



Rev. C. W. HENRY, President 
HARRY H. NOYES, Treasurer and Clerk 

Rev. E. VICTOR BIGELOW MYRON E. GUTTERSON 
Rev. NEWMAN MATTHEWS FREDERIC S. BOUTWELL 
EDMOND E. HAMMOND JOHN H. CAMPION 



78 



REPORT OF TREASURER 



PRINCIPAL FUND AND RESERVE 



January 1, 1924 



Cash in Banks 


$11053.22 




Real Estate Mortgages and Bonds 


65946.78 


77000.00 


Reserve — From profit on Bonds 




1517.82 




$78517.82 


December 31, 1924 






Cash in Banks 


$24013.26 




Real Estate Mortgages and Bonds 


54504.56 


$78517.82 






INCOME 






January 1, 1924 






Cash in Banks 


$1008.91 




Interest 


4738.87 


$5747.78 






EXPENDITURES 






N. C. Hamblin, Principal 


$860.00 




N. C. Hamblin, Travel 


10.00 




M. E. Stevens, Instructor 


2190.00 




Rogers Agency, Insurance 


25.00 




Andover National Bank, Box Rent 


5.00 




Andover National Bank, Stamps 


1.20 




Andover National Bank, Interest 


19.25 




Harry H. Noyes, Treasurer 


200.00 




City of Boston, Taxes 


120.38 




Expense 


7.32 




Cash on hand 


2309.63 


• 

^747 7« 



79 



BARNARD FUND 
10 Shares Union Pacific R. R. Pref. 



Jan. 1, 1924 








Cash in Bank 




$25.50 




Dividends 




40.00 


$65.50 






Prizes Awarded 








First 




$20.00 




Second 




12.00 




Third 




8.00 




December 31, 1924, Cash 


on hand 


25.50 


$65.60 



DRAPER FUND 



Jan. 1, 1924 

Cash in Bank $1436.84 
Dividend 72.70 


$1509.54 
$1509.54 


Scholarship 60.00 
Dec. 31, 1924, Cash in Bank 1449.54 


GOLDSMITH FUND 
Jan. 1, 1924 

Cash in Bank $270.26 
Dividends 13.67 



$283.93 

Prizes Awarded 1 . 00 

Dec. 31, 1924, Cash in Bank 273.93 

$283.93 

HARRY H. NOYES, Treasurer 

Examined : 

J. S. Robertson 
Harry Sellars 
. L. S. Finger 

Edmond E. Hammond 

80 



TOWN WARRANT 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ss.: To either of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in elections and in town affairs to meet and assemble at 
the designated polling places in Precincts One, Two, Three and 
Four, viz.: The Town House in Precinct One; the Old School 
House, Ballardvale, in Precinct Two; the Boys' Club House, 
Shawsheen Village, in Precinct Three; and the Phillips Club 
House, School Street, in Precinct Four, in said Andover, on 
Monday, The Second Day of March, 1925, at 6 o'clock a.m., 
to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. — To elect a Moderator for one year, Town Clerk 
for one year, Treasurer for one year, Collector of Taxes for one 
year, one member of the Board of Selectmen for three years, one 
member of the Board of Assessors for three years, three members 
of the School Committee for three years, one member of the 
School Committee for one year (to fill vacancy), two members 
of the Board of Public Works for three years, one member of the 
Board of Health for three years, three Auditors of Accounts for 
one year, three Constables for one year, one Trustee of Memorial 
Hall Library for seven years, one Tree Warden for one year, five 
Trustees of Punchard Free School for three years, and all town 
officers required by law to be elected by ballot. 

All to be voted for on one ballot. The polls will be open from 
6 o'clock a.m. to 5 o'clock p.m. 

After final action on the preceding Article one, the said meeting 
shall stand adjourned by virtue of Section 20, Chapter 39, of the 

81 



General Laws, to Monday, March 9th, at 1.30 o'clock p.m. at 
the Town Hall, then and there to act upon the following articles, 
namely : 

Article 2. — To elect all other officers not required by law to 
be elected by ballot. 

Article 3. — To determine what sums of money shall be appro- 
priated for Almshouse Expenses, Relief out of Almshouse, Aiding 
Mothers with Dependent Children, Board of Health, Brush Fires, 
Fire Department, Hay Scales, Highway Department, Insurance, 
Interest, Memorial Hall Library, Memorial Day, Post 99, 
G. A. R., Parks and Playsteads, Police, Printing, Election and 
Registration, Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital Maintenance, 
Public Dump, Retirement of Veterans, Reserve Fund, Redemp- 
tion of Water, Sewer, High School, Main Street, Shawsheen 
Bridge, Essex Sanatorium, and Shawsheen School Bonds, Schools, 
Sewer Maintenance, Soldiers' Relief, Spring Grove Cemetery, 
State Aid, Street Lighting, Town Officers, Town House, Tree 
Warden and Moth Department, Water Maintenance and Con- 
struction, Andover Post No. 8, American Legion, and other town 
charges and expenses. 

Article 4. — To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to extend the water main from the Pumping Station, 
Lowell Street, to Etalo Belmessiere's residence and appropriate 
the sum of twenty thousand ($20,000) dollars therefor, on pe- 
tition of W. I. Livingston and others. 

Article 5. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$12,000 to make necessary changes in the Water System as recom- 
mended by the Fire Underwriters. Said changes to be made on 
Highland Road, Morton St., Summer St., Abbot St., Pine St., 
and a new 6-inch main on Pasho St., and the connecting up of 
several dead ends, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 6. — To see if the Town will vote to build a main sewer 
on Pasho St. a distance of 772 ft. and also on Haverhill St a 
distance of 750 ft. and appropriate the sum of $5,000 therefor, 
and assess betterments upon the estates benefited by said 
extensions. Said work to be done under the direction of the 
Board of Public Works, on petition of said Board. 

Article 7. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$18,000 to rebuild Elm St., from the North Andover line to a 

82 



point at or near Whittier St. Said work to be done only with the 
understanding that the State assume the remainder of the cost. 
Also to see if the Town will indemnify the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts against any and all claims for land, grade and 
drainage damages which may be caused by or result from the 
laying out and construction of State Highway on Elm St. in 
Andover, and will authorize the Board of Selectmen to sign an 
indemnity agreement therefor in behalf of the Town, or take any 
other action in respect thereto, on petition of the Board of Public 
Works. 

Article 8. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$8,000. to rebuild Haverhill St. from a point near the Boston & 
Maine underpass to the North Andover line. Said work to be 
done only under the condition that the State and County each 
appropriate a like sum for said work, on petition of the Board of 
Public Works. 

Article 9. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$5,000. together with the unexpended balance appropriated last 
year under Article 19, for the purpose of making improvements 
on and in connection with the Playstead. Said improvements to 
be carried out in accordance with plans drawn by Philip W. 
Foster, landscape architect, on petition of the Board of Public 
Works. 

Article 10. — To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 
sum of $4299.01, the same being the amount returned to the 
Town under the provisions of Chapter 480 of the Acts of 1924, 
"An act providing for the return to the Cities and Towns of 
certain surplus funds collected to provide suitable recognition of 
those residents of Massachusetts who served in the Army and 
NaVy of the United States during the war with Germany," for 
the purpose of playground development, on petition of Ralph T. 
Berry and others. 

Article 11. — To see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
$1500. for the purpose of maintaining the swimming area at 
Pomp's Pond, on petition of John F. O'Connell and others. 

Article 12. — To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$500. to be used by the Trustees of the Memorial Hall Library in 
preparing plans for an addition to the present building, on 
petition of Trustees of Memorial Hall Library. 

83 



Article 13. — To see if the Town will vote to purchase the plot 
of ground on Andover Street, Ballard Vale, used last summer as a 
playground, and owned by Mrs. H. D. Rockwell of North Ando- 
ver, the same to be made a permanent public playground, and 
appropriate a sum of money therefor, on petition of Roy M. 
Haynes and others. 

Article 14. — To see if the Town will authorize the Moderator 
to appoint a committee of five members including the building in- 
spector to make a complete study of the present building laws and 
submit a report on changes to bring before the next annual Town 
Meeting for consideration and action, on petition of Joseph F. 
Cole and others. 

Article 15. — To see what disposition the town will vote to 
make of the Richardson School property on Lowell Street. 

Article 16. — To determine the method of collecting the taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 17. — To authorize the Town Treasurer to hire money 
for the use of the town in anticipation of the revenue of the 
current financial year, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

Article 18. — To determine what disposition shall be made of 
unexpended appropriations. 

Article 19. — To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

Article 20. — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof, seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by the By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this sixteenth day of February, A.D. 
1925. 

FRANK H. HARDY 
CHARLES BOWMAN 
ANDREW McTERNEN 

Selectmen of Andover. 



84 



RECOMMENDATIONS OF FINANCE 
COMMITTEE 



The Finance Committee respectfully presents h